Uber cofounder laments company's culture problems, fails to mention Travis Kalanick

It seems that one of Uber cofounders would like to apologize for the culture problems at Uber, except he forgot the word "apologize." He also forgot to mention one of the drivers of the problem: the leadership, namely CEO Travis Kalanick.

Garrett Camp, a cofounder of Uber who now serves as chairman, wrote a blog post on Medium Tuesday — a week after Kalanick took a leave of absence from the ride-hailing giant and other major executive and internal shakeups occurred. In that 2-minute read, titled "Uber's path forward," Camp reflects, a bit, on what happened and what is being done.

"Like many of you, recent events have left me upset and deeply reflective. When we designed the Uber prototype app back in 2009, we were just focused on creating an app that would make it easier to get around," Camp wrote.

According to Camp, Uber is undergoing "growing pains" in part due to its rapid growth.

That may be true. Uber has rapidly grown to more than 13,000 employees.

But he largely omits a whole lot of other truths:

That Uber failed to build an adequate human resources department. That Uber's management team let cases of sexual harassment go unaddressed. That Uber's leadership themselves made incredibly poor decisions that included obtaining and reviewing a rape victim's medical record and picking up women at a karaoke-escort bar.

"A friend recently asked me, 'What went wrong?' and the answer is that we had not listened well enough to those who got us here... our team and especially our drivers," Camp wrote.

Again, perhaps it's not just about listening. Perhaps the men in charge lacked a moral compass — and still do.

Camp addressed the changes toward the end of his post and that includes new staffing.

"Which is why we must now hold ourselves to a higher standard going forward. We've formed a new executive leadership team, and the board is actively recruiting new directors and talented executives," he wrote.

It is unclear what Camp believes this "higher standard" to be. But we do know it involves pushing harder — except with more people this time.

"We should still push hard for what we believe in, and be much more collaborative going forward," he wrote.

What say you, Travis?

RELATED: Uber CEO Travis Kalanick

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Former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick speaks to students during an interaction at the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) campus in Mumbai, India, January 19, 2016.

(REUTERS/Danish Siddiqui)

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick gestures as he addresses a gathering during a conference of start-up businesses in New Delhi, India, January 16, 2016.

(REUTERS/Adnan Abidi)

Chief Executive Officer of Uber Travis Kalanick and Gabi Holzwarth arrive at the Google, HBO and the Smithsonian?s American Art Museum ?Celebration of Creativity? cocktail party to celebrate the White House Correspondents' Association dinner weekend in Washington, U.S., April 29, 2016.

(REUTERS/Joshua Roberts)

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick attends the summer World Economic Forum in Tianjin, China, June 26, 2016.

(REUTERS/Shu Zhang)

India?s Minister of Law and Information and Technology Ravi Shankar Prasad shakes hands with Uber CEO Travis Kalanick before the start of their meeting in New Delhi, India, December 15, 2016.

(REUTERS/Adnan Abidi)

Uber Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Travis Kalanick works with fourth graders during Cooking Matters, a nutrition class taught by 18 Reasons, a local partner of Share our Strength at Glen Park Elementary School in San Francisco, California, December 10, 2014.

(REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach)

Uber Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Travis Kalanick (2nd R) works with fourth graders during Cooking Matters, a nutrition class taught by 18 Reasons, a local partner of Share our Strength at Glen Park Elementary School in San Francisco, California, December 10, 2014.

(REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach)

Dieter Zetsche, chief executive officer of Daimler AG, left, and Travis Kalanick, billionaire and chief executive officer of Uber Technologies Inc., listen before speaking during the Noah technology conference in Berlin, Germany, on Wednesday, June 8, 2016. The conference, one of the tech industry's premier events, was launched in 2009 and runs June 8-9.

(Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of US transportation company Uber Travis Kalanick at an event in New Delhi.

(Photo by Ramesh Sharma/India Today Group/Getty Images)

Valerie Jarrett, senior advisor to U.S. President Barack Obama, left, speaks as Travis Kalanick, billionaire and chief executive officer of Uber Technologies Inc., listens during the 2016 Global Entrepreneurship Summit (GES) at Stanford University in Stanford, California, U.S., on Thursday, June 23, 2016. The annual event brings together entrepreneurs from around the world for 3 days of networking, workshops and conferences.

(David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Travis Kalanick, billionaire and chief executive officer of Uber Technologies Inc., looks on during the Noah technology conference in Berlin, Germany, on Wednesday, June 8, 2016. The conference, one of the tech industry's premier events, was launched in 2009 and runs June 8-9.

(Krisztian Bocsi/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

Uber founder Travis Kalanick attends 'Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology', the 2016 Costume Institute Gala at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 02, 2016 in New York, New York.

(Photo by Taylor Hill/FilmMagic)

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