Amount of money people need in order to feel financially secure

When it comes to finances, we all have a number we feel would make us financially secure.

But a recent study by the money management app Banktivity says the magic number to feeling secure is just over $80 thousand dollars.

Frivolous spending is something we are all guilty of. In fact, according to the survey, almost a third of Americans polled would run out of cash in less than a week if they were to lose their main source of income.

RELATED: 5 financial myths that just aren't true

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5 financial myths that just aren't true
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5 financial myths that just aren't true
#1. "Home are great investments"
"If you're young and are burdened by debt, renting is probably the better bet for you. There's nothing wrong with renting either! Buying a house means putting a LOT of cash down and taking on a mortgage. Mortgages aren't exactly flexible. Then you've got to worry about monthly maintenance, taxes, insurance, etc. Owning a house is expensive, illiquid, and not something you should consider until you are REALLY REALLY REALLY ready." -The Funny Financial Planner
#2. "Investing is only for the wealthy"
"Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. This one just downright annoys me. Maybe you were conditioned to believe this? I'm here to tell you it is a MYTH! Investing is not as complicated as you might think. Sure, there's a learning curve, but with a little help and research you can begin. Maybe you've already begun? Do you have a retirement plan (401k or IRA?), then congratulations, you're already an investor. And guess what?! You don't need $100,000 to start." -The Funny Financial Planner
#3. "A will guarantees your assets will be distributed how you want"
"This is a myth my friends. In fact, if the beneficiaries named in your retirement plans (401k, IRA, Roth IRA, etc.) are different than those you've named in your will...the assets go to the beneficiaries on the retirement accounts and NOT those named in your will. Make sure your will and the beneficiaries you've named on the accounts are in agreement." -The Funny Financial Planner
#4. "I don't want to invest now... I'm trying to time the market"
"'Timing the market' means you think you can figure out the best times to buy low and sell high. Well here's a quote from famed investor Peter Lynch, "I can't recall ever once having seen the name of a market timer on Forbes' annual list of the richest people in the world. If it were truly possible to predict corrections, you'd think somebody would've made billions by doing it." That's all you need to know. It's just not possible. It's best to get in as soon as possible and have a solid, long-term, passive plan, with proper diversification." -The Funny Financial Planner
#5. "I'm too young to worry about retirement"
"Nonsense!!! Time is the best tool you have to build wealth. The longer you wait, the less money you're going to have at retirement. Even if you think it's a long way off and you don't have the money to start now, begin anyway. Do what you can. It will make a HUGE difference in the end. Time coupled with compound interest is pure magic my friends. (Click on the words "compound interest" to see Investopedia's explanation). It's truly the eighth wonder of the world." -The Funny Financial Planner
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The average person spends $140 dollars a month on things they don't really need. Which to some may not sound like a lot but actually comes to over $100 thousand dollars over an average adult lifetime.

The most unnecessary purchases are eating out and ordering takeout, needless groceries, online shopping, and alcohol.

Only 5 percent of respondents thought they were "financially savvy" but married couples gave themselves a significantly higher rating than single people.

A Banktivity spokesperson says: "Setting a clear budget and getting the right assistance in making smart investment choices will make all the difference."

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