Study shows that we're spending an alarming amount more than we're making on weddings

It's hard to separate the excitement of planning the wedding of your dreams with the inevitable dread that comes with realizing just how much the celebration is going to cost you.

But getting caught up in having the celebration of a lifetime can lead many — rather, most — to go way over budget and spend more than they can afford to.

SEE ALSO: The least (& most) expensive places to get married in America

All in the name of true love, right?

Thanks to a new survey by WeddingWire, new data gathered the course of the past 10 years points to the fact that not only have we not gotten any better at reigning in our spending come wedding season, but that we may have gradually gotten worse.

The price of an engagement ring increased by a whopping 57 percent — and maybe we can blame that on social media and the need to flaunt what we've got whenever the oppotunity presents itself.

Though the average number of guests at a wedding reception has barely changed (from 110 guests in 2007 to 124 guests in 2017), the price of the overall wedding has increased an astounding 81 percent.

So, what's the average price of a wedding today?

According to WeddingWire's data, the average cost of a wedding ceremony and reception is around $28,000, compared with roughly $16,000 a decade ago.

Here's a complete list of which wedding vendors to tip:

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Complete list of which wedding vendors to tip
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Complete list of which wedding vendors to tip

Officiant: If your officiant is a member of the clergy, you may not be able to tip him or her directly, but you can make an additional donation to the house of worship. For nonclergy, tip around $50.

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Photographer and Videographer: As a general rule, it’s not necessary to tip the owner of the company (which wedding photographers often are), though you could tip $100 or more if you feel so inclined. If there is an assistant, tip the assistant $50 to $75.

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Caterer and Waitstaff: Gratuity (or a service fee) is often included in your total bill. If not (or if you’d like to give a little more), $10 to $20 per person is a nice gesture. Unlike at a restaurant, the waitstaff at your wedding isn’t depending on tips for wages.

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Hair and Makeup: Like at the salon, tip around 15 to 20 percent of the service. You may provide this tip yourself if you’re paying for all of your bridesmaids’ services, or include a tip in the total that they each owe so they can make sure to have enough cash on hand.

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Delivery and Rental Staff: Talk to your vendors about how many people they’ll have on site for your wedding day, then plan to tip $10 to $20 per person.

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Wedding Planner, Baker, Stationer, and Florist: As business owners, these pros won’t be expecting a tip. However, if you really loved their work or felt they went above and beyond, consider putting cash or a check in the mail after the wedding, along with a thank-you card (especially because your planner is the only one of these vendors you’ll probably see on your wedding day). If your planner brought an assistant who did great work, be sure to send over a tip for her or him as well! 

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Accounting for inflation, that $16,000 would equate to around $19,200 today — and this would still account for a 46 percent change in wedding price over the course of the past 10 years.

But what's especially alarming about all of this data is the fact that, according to the US Census ACS survey, the median household income hasn't increased to correlate with the increase of spending — in fact, it's stayed relatively stagnant (from $56,122 in 2005 to $55,775 in 2015).

And after adjusting for inflation, the average household income seems to have actually decreased by a substantial 20 percent.

This comes at no surprise, then, that the top concern of wedding planning has remained the same over the past decade — determining a budget.

Thanks to the rise of sites like Pinterest, Etsy and Instagram, having "DIY" elements to your wedding seems much easier and attainable than ever before — and that can cause a lot of stress in terms of knowing where to cut costs and where to shell out.

That's probably why only 14 percent of couples struggled with "determining what components of the wedding to DIY" a decade ago while that number has more than doubled today at 33 percent.

Instagrammable and trendy vendors, like food trucks and quirky photobooths, have also brought confusion to couples — only 10 percent of couples a decade ago felt unsure when it came to deciding what to use a vendor for, where nearly 32 percent of couples today find this to be a "challenging" part of the wedding planning process.

But though prices and expenses have changed throughout the years, one thing has remained the same -- love is still alive, no matter what the cost!

RELATED: What you should never, ever, ever do at a wedding

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What you should never, ever, ever do at a wedding
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What you should never, ever, ever do at a wedding

Forget to RSVP

If you are invited to a wedding and plan to attend, RSVP—and do so early! This way, the couple will know to expect you and will have a seat waiting.

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Show Up Late

That time on the invitation? That’s when the bride is going to walk down the aisle. Make sure you get to the ceremony at least 15 minutes before the time stated. You’ll be able to get a great seat, have time to read over the program, and be ready when the music starts!

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Don’t Show Up at All

If you told the couple you’ll be there, you'd better be there! If something changes at the last minute, do your best to give the couple advance notice so they can inform their planner or coordinator and venue manager. That way, your table for 10 won't have two empty seats because you and your date didn’t make it (and hopefully the bride and groom aren’t stuck paying for your dinner).

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Wear White

Self-explanatory. Unless the invitation specifically states that everyone should wear white, wedding guests should choose another color. Same goes for cream, ivory, and teeny floral patterns with a mostly white base. If it could be a wedding/rehearsal dinner/bridal shower dress, skip it!

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Disrespect the Staff

Be polite to anyone working that evening, from the wedding planner all the way down to the busboy. You are a reflection on the couple, so make them look good by being nice!

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Get Trashed

Sure, have a few drinks and enjoy yourself. But know your limit and avoid getting totally wasted. Any sort of drunken breakdown is best left to your own Saturday night, so don’t let it happen in the middle of your friend’s big day.

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More on AOL.com:
Jen Glantz is making a living in NYC as a professional 'Bridesmaid for Hire'
10 ways to save big on your wedding
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