5 high-paying marijuana jobs in the legal cannabis industry

The legal cannabis industry is booming. The expansion and growth has recently been compared to the way broadband internet spread in the 2000s, or even the dot-com boom. One of the latest predictions is that more jobs will be created in legal marijuana than in manufacturing by 2020. This is an exciting time for folks looking to work in the industry, and there are many different jobs that need to be done. Let's take a closer look at a few of the highest paying jobs in the legal cannabis industry. Is one of them the right for you?

1. Store Managers.

Retail outlets in the legal cannabis industry need managers just like any other operation. These store managers can do pretty well financially, earning as much $75,000 a year. They frequently enjoy medical coverage and vacation time, just like they would if they worked as the manager of a more traditional store. And, they often receive bonuses on top of their standard pay. These can be substantial, especially when managing one of the more successful stores.

2. Cannabis Sales Representatives.

Cannabis sales reps work just like reps in any other industry. These salespeople are responsible for visiting stores and dispensaries and forging business relationships between them and growers. They must be knowledgeable about all aspects of the business — from the products themselves to any and all relevant regulations. A significant percentage of a sales representative's salary comes from commission in a traditional industry. And, there's no reason the legal cannabis industry should be any different. There is great money-making potential here for the talented worker.

RELATED: Here are all the marijuana laws by state:

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Marijuana legalization laws by state
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Marijuana legalization laws by state

Alabama: Medical use only, otherwise possession is a felony

(Photo: Dennis Macdonald via Getty Images)

Alaska: Marijuana legalized for medical and recreational use 

(Photo: Zoonar/N.Okhitin via Getty Images)

Arizona: Marijuana legalized for medical use

(Photo: Mikel Ortega via Getty Images)

Arkansas: Medical use only

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California: Legal for medical and recreational use

(Getty)

Colorado: Legal for medical and recreational use  

(REUTERS/Rick Wilking)

Connecticut: Decriminalized and legalized for medical use 

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Delaware: Decriminalized

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Florida: Medical use only

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Georgia: Medical use only

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Hawaii: Medical use only

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Idaho: Not legal

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Illinois: Decriminalized

(Photo: VisionsofAmerica/Joe Sohm)

Indiana: Not legal

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Iowa: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

Kansas: Not legal

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Kentucky: Not legal

(Photo: Dorling Kindersley via Getty Images)

Louisiana: Medical use only

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Maine: Legal for medical and recreational use

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Maryland: Decriminalized

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Massachusetts: Legal

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Michigan: Medical use only

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Minnesota: Decriminalized

(Photo: Getty Images)

Mississippi: Decriminalized on first offense

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Missouri: Not legal

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Montana: Medical use only

(Photo: Dennis Macdonald via Getty Images)

Nebraska: Decriminalized on first offense only

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Nevada: Legal

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New Hampshire: Medical use only

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New Jersey: Medical use only

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New Mexico: Medical use only

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New York: Decriminalized unless in public view

(REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton)

North Carolina: Decriminalized

(Photo: Getty Images)

North Dakota: Medical use only

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Ohio: Decriminalized

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Oklahoma: Medical use only

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Oregon: Legal for medical and recreational use

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Pennsylvania: Medical use only

(Photo: Henryk Sadura via Getty Images)

Rhode Island: Decriminalized

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South Carolina: Not legal

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South Dakota: Not legal

(Photo: Dave and Les Jacobs via Getty Images)

Tennessee: Medical use only

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Texas: Medical use only, decriminalized in Houston and Dallas

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Utah: Not legal 

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Vermont: Decriminalized

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Virginia: Not legal

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Washington: Legal for medical and recreational use

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West Virginia: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

Wisconsin: Medical use only

(Photo: Getty Images)

Wyoming: Not legal 

(Photo: Space Images via Getty Images)

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3. Dispensary Owner.

The job of dispensary owner differs from that of store manager in many ways. Laws around cannabis vary greatly by state, and dispensaries operate in places where cannabis is legal for medical purposes but not for recreation. These owners must stay current in terms of these laws, and adhere to them strictly, in addition to fulfilling the responsibilities of running a business. These folks often earn upwards of $100,000 as compensation for their efforts, assuming their dispensary is successful.

4. Grow Masters.

The most desired and sought after professionals in the legal cannabis industry might be grow masters. They are responsible for cultivating the strains of marijuana plants which will later be sold to clients. The best grow masters are in high demand. And, they can earn upwards of $100,000 per year.

"It's a pretty specific skill set," Derek Peterson, CEO of the cannabis company Terra Tech Corp told Forbes, "and over time I expect the recreational marijuana will shape up with celebrity cultivators like celebrity chefs."

5. Edibles Chefs.

The work of marijuana edibles chefs involves more than just cooking. The work of an edibles chef often revolves around the careful infusion of marijuana concentrate into specific doses for safe and measured consumption. Depending on the size of the business, and the talent level of the chef, these professionals can expect to earn anywhere between $50,000 – $100,000 per year.

Tell Us What You Think

Have you worked in the legal cannabis industry? We want to hear from you! Leave a comment or join the discussion on Twitter.

The post 5 High-Paying Marijuana Jobs In The Legal Cannabis Industry appeared first on Career News.

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