Nintendo will pay you up to $20,000 if you can hack the Switch


Calling all hackers — Nintendo is offering up a whole bunch of money to security-savvy Switch owners that can find vulnerabilities in the company's latest console. Finding and submitting a big security problem could see you walking away with a cool $20,000.

Nintendo expanded its public security flaw hunt to the Nintendo Switch yesterday, offering up compensation to anyone who finds and reports new vulnerabilities in the month-old console. Depending on the severity of the flaw, its exploitability, and the quality of the report, bug hunters could earn between $100 and $20,000.

Nintendo already offers rewards for vulnerability reports on the Nintendo 3DS and New 3DS through the bug-hunting website HackerOne. The project first launched for Nintendo in December 2016 and has already paid out rewards to three individuals (unfortunately we don't know how much they made for their efforts).

Nintendo is specifically looking for system vulnerabilities in these areas:

  • Privilege escalation from userland

  • Kernel takeover

  • ARM® TrustZone® takeover

  • Userland takeover (for applications)

If you find a new vulnerability worthy of reporting, Nintendo will reward you after it has fixed the problem or within four months of receiving the report.

Other companies in the tech world offer similar programs that have seen successful bug hunters earning huge chunks of money, including Google and Facebook. This kind of crowdsourced flaw-hunting allows tech companies to get extra eyes on their hardware and software, bringing in people who may notice bugs that companies' own security teams miss.

RELATED: Nintendo around the world

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Nintendo, around the world
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Nintendo, around the world
LOS ANGELES, CA - NOVEMBER 11: A general view of atmosphere during the Super Smash Bros for Wii U event in West Hollywood, CA on November 11, 2014 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Buckner/Getty Images for Nintendo of America)
Dozens of Pikachu characters, the famous character of Nintendo's videogame software Pokemon, parade at the Landmark Plaza shopping mall in Yokohama, suburban Tokyo on August 14, 2014. The Pikachu mascots walk around daily to attract summer vacationers as a part of the 'Great Pikachu Outbreak' event through the weekend. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
Customers play video games at an electric shop in Tokyo on October 29, 2014. Japanese videogame giant Nintendo said its first-half net profit soared to 132 million USD as a sharply weaker yen boosted its bottom line and offset slowing sales. AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
Gaming fans play 'Fluster Cluck' at the annual E3 video game extravaganza in Los Angeles, California on June 10, 2014, where Microsoft and Sony are battling for the hearts of hard core gamers whose devotion could determine whether Xbox One or PlayStation 4 rule console play and Internet Age entertainment.. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A Super Mario display at the Nintendo section attracts attention at the annual E3 video game extravaganza in Los Angeles, California on June 10, 2014. Nintendo said it is adding real-world game figures to Wii U play to help boost the popularity of its console, which has lagged rivals in the market, with Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime saying 'amiibo' game pieces embedded with computer chips to swap data with Wii U tablet controllers would debut in the 'Mario Smash Brothers' game later this year. AFP PHOTO/Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - NOVEMBER 03: Actor Noah Munck attends Nintendo's celebration of the launch of Super Mario 3D Land at Siren Studios on November 3, 2011 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Jason Merritt/Getty Images for Nintendo)
390946 06: A potential customer tries out the new Nintendo Gameboy Advance computer game June 21, 2001 in London. The game is due to be released in Europe on June 22, 2001. (Photo by Sion Touhig/GettyImages)
Tokyo, JAPAN: Japan's first customer Kotaro Watanabe displays Nintendo's new video game console 'Wii' at a Tokyo electric shop, 02 December 2006, while Sega's game character Sonic the Hedgedog (R) celebrates him. Some thousands video game fans queued in early morning to buy the new video game console priced 25,000 yen (215 USD). AFP PHOTO / Yoshikazu TSUNO (Photo credit should read YOSHIKAZU TSUNO/AFP/Getty Images)
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