The most affordable states for first-time homebuyers - and the least

First-time homebuyers have the best housing options in Middle America.

Iowa, Utah, Minnesota, Kansas and Missouri offer the most attractive housing markets for young buyers, according to a new Bankrate.com study. The analysis considers five factors in each state: housing affordability, the job market for young adults, housing supply, credit availability and the homeownership rate for those 35 and younger.

1Iowa
2Utah
3Minnesota
4Kansas
5Missouri
6North Dakota
7South Dakota
8Wyoming
9Vermont
10Nebraska

At the other end of the spectrum, the worst states for first-time homebuyers are the ones with some the highest housing prices nationwide, or high rates of poverty. California comes in dead last, followed by Hawaii, New York, Louisiana and Mississippi.

41Massachusetts
42Oregon
43Colorado
44Texas
45Rhode Island
46Mississippi
47Louisiana
48New York
49Hawaii
50California

Related: The Most Outrageous Housing Market in America

"Tight market conditions and unaffordably high prices really plague what many young Americans feel are the most desirable places to put down roots," said Bankrate.com analyst Claes Bell in a statement. "On the other hand, the availability of FHA loans that allow down payments of as little as 3.5 percent may make it easier to buy a home in high-priced markets than you think."

RELATED: If you're looking to buy a home soon, check out the vital tips:

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Homebuyer tips

1. Make a Wish List

“You’ll waste a lot of time if you don’t know what you want,” Brian Davis, director of education for Spark Rental, says. “Know how many bedrooms you need, which amenities are must-have, and which are desired but not mandatory. Most of all, know your price range and stick to it.”

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2. Consult Your Co-Buyer

If you’re purchasing the home with a loved one “make sure you both are on the same page,” Patrick Gobin, associate broker with District Realty Team at New York Living Solutions, says. “Conflicting opinions makes the process very difficult. Example: One person wants a ranch and one person wants a two-story house.”

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3. Determine Your Debt-to-Income Ratio (DTI)

Here’s how. Remember, a DTI (how much you make vs. how much debt you’re already paying off each month) over 50% or more will severely limit your ability to borrow.

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4. Check Your Credit Score

Because it’s going to play a major role in whether you can actually get a mortgage and what rate you’ll pay. You can view two of your credit scores, updated every 14 days, for free on Credit.com. (P.S. If you have a co-buyer who’ll be on the mortgage, they’ll want to check their credit, too.)

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5. Pull Your Credit Reports

There may be a few things you can do to clean up your credit before you apply for a mortgage. Plus, you’ll want to make sure there aren’t any errors weighing your scores down. Speaking of which …

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6. Dispute Any Errors

Credit bureaus have 30 to 45 days to resolve disputes and remove inaccurate information, so if something’s amiss, now’s the time to address any errors that you may find.

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7. Pay Down Credit Card Debt

Getting rid of big balances can improve your DTI and creditworthiness — and relatively soon, because issuers generally update the credit bureaus on your charges each month.

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8. Continue to Tidy Your Credit

You can find 11 solid ways to soup up your credit here.

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9. Decide on a Down Payment

A 20% down payment is considered ideal, since any amount below that will have you paying for private mortgage insurance (PMI). There are programs out there that help homeowners get a mortgage with much less down, which brings us to …

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10. Know Your Loan Programs

Most homebuyers have two options: a conventional home loan bought and sold by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac or an FHA loan insured by the Federal Housing Administration. Veterans can also consider VA loans, which notably feature a 0% down payment.

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11. Research Rates

Your interest rate is going to play a big role in determining your monthly payment, so be sure you know what current rate ranges are being offered — and what you’re likely to qualify for, based on your credit.

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12. Prepare for Property Taxes

Yup, you’ll have to pay the government each year for your land — and you’ll want to get an estimate of how much money you’re likely to owe, since it will seriously affect your housing budget. You can find a full explainer on property taxes here.

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13. Account for Closing Costs

They generally run between 3% and 5% of your purchase price, depending on location and other factors.

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14. Feed Your Emergency Fund

Because buying a home is going to put a serious drain on your bank accounts and you don’t want to be down to your last dollar. Experts generally recommend you have at least six to 12 months of income as backup reserves.

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15. Figure Out How Much Home You Can Afford

This will be affected by your DTI, credit scores, prospective interest rate, down payment, property taxes and whether you’ll be paying for private mortgage insurance, among other things. (More tips here for how to get a rough estimate on how much home you can comfortably buy.)

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16. File Your Taxes

Your mortgage lender is going to ask for at least two years’ worth of tax returns, so it’s a good idea to shore up with Uncle Sam — and print out or download your returns from two prior years.

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17. Pick a Neighborhood

“Location is one of the most important factors when finding a home,”  David Lewis, owner of full-service real estate agency The Lewis Group, says. “It’s also the only one that you can’t change. Knowing what areas you’d like to live in prepares you to make the jump when it is time to move forward with an offer.”

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18. Study the Market …

You’ll want to know what you’re in for: What’s the median home price in the area you’re looking to live? Are you in a buyer’s or seller’s market? Are solid homes going for more or less than list price?

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19. … & the Process

Oh, if only the homebuying process were so simple. Unfortunately, there are a whole lot of steps between finding a home and closing on it. Get familiar with all the major steps: pre-approval, home inspection, home appraisal, title search, closing, etc.

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20. Hit the Open Houses

A little window-shopping can do a house hunter good. Visit some open houses ahead of your formal search to get an idea of list prices in your preferred area(s) — and whether your list of “wants” is realistic with your budget.

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21. Get a Pair of Flip-Flops … 

… or some other kind of easily removed shoes, because most homeowners or listing agents are going to ask you to leave your kicks at the front door.

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22. Search for Schools

“If you have kids, carefully examine the school choices and districts available to you,” William Mayben, CEO of consulting firm Wm Mayben and Associates and former division president for National Public Builders, says. There are sites online that can help you pinpoint school ratings, crime rates, etc.

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23. Calculate Your Potential Commute

The length of your commute can seriously impact the enjoyment of your home. How much time are you realistically willing to spend in the car, on the bus or on a train?

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24. Find a Realtor

You don’t have to use one, but there are certainly benefits to enlisting the services of a reputable Realtor or agent. Case in point: They can give you insights into the current market and walk you through the homebuying process. Bonus: The seller pays their commission.

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25. Consider a Specialist

“If buyers are looking for ranches in the Stoney Gardens neighborhood, they should find a realtor who specializes in (drum roll please…) ranches in the Stoney Gardens neighborhood,” Davis says. “The best Realtors know a specific segment of the market inside and out, and can help borrowers who want that specific market segment.”

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26. Vet Mortgage Lenders

Similarly, you’ll want to research reputable mortgage lenders or brokers in your area to determine who you’re comfortable doing business with.

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27. Request Recommendations

For Realtors, mortgage lenders and other members of the homebuying team you’ll need to onboard.

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28. Get Pre-Approved

Once your credit is as good as it’s going to get and you’re ready to start your search, be sure to get pre-approved for a mortgage. That’ll signal to a seller and/or Realtor you’re a serious buyer worthy of their consideration.

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29. Rate-Shop

Just be sure to do so in a 30- to 45-day window, since that’s how long most credit scoring models will group applications for like-financing (in this case, mortgages) as one inquiry.

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30. Ready Your Bank Statements

Because your lender is going to ask for them. Note: You’ll probably be expected to turn over brokerage or retirement account statements for at least the last two or three months as well.

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31. Request Your Pay Stubs

Most of us direct deposit, but your lender is going to ask for at least two months worth of pay stubs. So, if you’ve been setting and forgetting, now’s the time to track down where to access your paycheck details.

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32. Think About What Other Paperwork You’ll Need

Getting some gift money? You’ll have to document it. Just got a new job? Be prepared to turn over more employment verification. Ask your mortgage lender for a full list of all the major paperwork needed to get your loan fully approved.

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33. Find an Attorney …

Some states mandate a real estate attorney prepare your purchase contract — and, even if yours doesn’t, it can be a good idea to bring one on board. Be sure to research reputable real estate attorneys in your area and get an idea of what they’ll charge you.

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34. … & an Inspector

Yes, the bank is going to do the appraisal, but the buyer is responsible for the home inspection. You’ll need to find a certified, licensed professional and cover their bill.

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35. Learn What to Look for …

It’s not just about your wants and needs. When viewing a potential home, you’ll want to, among other things, check out the furnace, hot water heater, roof, plumbing, windows, insulation, HVAC systems, basement, closets and that old shed all the way at the other end of the yard.

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36. … & What to Ask

Per our partner Realtor.com, you’ll want to ask about the home’s sales history, any renovations the seller has done, monthly maintenance and utility costs and other things.

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37. Brush Up on Your (Offer) Letter Writing Skills …

Because in some markets you’ll want to write one to the seller when you make your bid. And, yes, while price is most important, a solid offer letter can be the difference between getting or losing out on your dream home. Good offer letters are generally personal, specific and positive.

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38 … & Your Negotiation Tactics

They’ll certainly come in handy.

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39. Keep Those Credit Cards on Ice …

Big changes to your debt levels can damage your DTI and your credit score — and your lender will check up on those items before closing. That’s why you’ll want to be extra careful about what you’re putting on your plastic.

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40. … & Cool the Credit Inquiries

Those can also ding your score and jeopardize your mortgage. So, sure, that Home Depot credit card could come in handy — but it’s a good idea to wait at least until after you close to take the retailer up on their offer (and then be sure your finances can handle it).

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41. Determine Your DIY IQ

“Assess your abilities as a handyman or handywoman,” Gobin says. “Buying a fixer-upper can be very expensive if you can’t even change a light bulb.”

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42. Get a Work Estimate

If you are looking at a fixer-upper or find a home that has all your major needs, minus one (say it’s missing hardwood floors), research what a particular project is likely to cost you. That’ll help you establish the true cost of the prospective home.

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43. Think About Resale Value

Even if you’re looking for your forever home, because, well, life happens. That’s why it’s good to at least consider what you’d have to sell the home for in order to recoup what you’re offering to pay. (Remember, too, when you go to sell, you’ll be the one paying a Realtor’s commission.) 

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44. Scout It All Out

“Visit your target house during different times of day,” Mayben says. “Pay attention to neighbors’ dogs, traffic, parking, the neighborhood feel and culture. Where are parks, shopping, bike or hike trails, coffee shops, etc.?” Asking neighbors about noise and other possible pain points can also pay off.

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45. Map Out Your Move …

Research moving companies — and the costs associated with them — to assess whether your cash reserves are adequate.

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46. … But Hold Off on the Home Furnishings

Especially if you’re planning to put those on a credit card. The last thing you want is those big balances throwing a monkey wrench into your credit — and your closing date. 

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47. Start Staging Your Current Home

“If you have to sell in order to buy, start working on that end of the deal,” Mayben says. “Maximizing the sell price maximizes the replacement price. Declutter your home for sale. Sell, donate, or otherwise get rid of things you don’t need. Develop a clear sense of your house value.”

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48. Get Ready to Compromise …

“Keep in mind the perfect home doesn’t exist unless you build it yourself,” Gobin says. 

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49. … & Be Disappointed

Because you may not get the first, second or even third home you bid on. “Multiple offers are very common these days,” Dorothy Mazeau, sales representative at Royal LePage RCR Realty, says. “You may be competing with one, two, or even twenty other buyers. Houses frequently sell for thousands over their list price.” 

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50. Stay the Course

Still, don’t get discouraged and/or recklessly ramp up your budget. “Know what you can afford and stick to it,” Mazeau says.

Buying a home is a huge financial commitment. If you’re looking for ways to reduce the red ink post-purchase, check out our roundup of 50 ways to stay out of debt

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When it comes to affordability, mortgage payments in the most expensive states claim about a third of household income. But in the most affordable states, mortgage payments eat up only 13 percent of household income — a huge difference. The most affordable states for all buyers are Iowa, Ohio and West Virginia, while the costliest are Hawaii, California and Oregon.

There are also stark differences in mortgage availability and under-35 homeownership rates. For instance, Bankrate found that less than 5 percent of mortgage applications were denied in Alaska. But in West Virginia, the rejection rate was three times as high. More than 40 percent of millennial households in Minnesota and Iowa own their own home, compared with less than a quarter in Hawaii, California and New York.

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