Apple, Uber, Netflix, Twitter join corporate rebuke of Trump immigration policy

Following the internal and public statements from the likes of Google, Facebook and Microsoft regarding the Trump administration's new immigration policy, two additional tech heavyweights have now added their voices to the fray.

On Saturday, in an email obtained by Recode, Apple CEO Tim Cook, the head of the world's leading tech company, reportedly took a stance against the new policy.

"Apple would not exist without immigration, let alone thrive and innovate the way we do. I've heard from many of you who are deeply concerned about the executive order issued yesterday restricting immigration from seven Muslim-majority countries. I share your concerns. It is not a policy we support," wrote Cook in the email, according to the report.

"There are employees at Apple who are directly affected by yesterday's immigration order. Our HR, Legal and Security teams are in contact with them, and Apple will do everything we can to support them. We're providing resources on AppleWeb for anyone with questions or concerns about immigration policies. And we have reached out to the White House to explain the negative effect on our coworkers and our company."

RELATED: Take a look at scenes from the JFK protest:

14 PHOTOS
Scenes from US airports after Trump's travel restriction
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Scenes from US airports after Trump's travel restriction
Hossein Khoshbakhty wipes tears from his eyes while speaking during an interview about his Iranian brother, a U.S. Green Card holder effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Homa Homaei, a U.S. Citizen from Iran, is embraced by a lawyer working to help her Iranian family members effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Port Authority Police Department block an entrance as protesters gather outside Terminal 4 at JFK airport in opposition to U.S. president Donald Trump's proposed ban on immigration in Queens, New York City, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Stephen Yang
Attorney Talia Inlender, (C), works on paperwork with lawyers for family members of passengers effected by the travel ban outside of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Lawyers work on paperwork to help family members of passengers effected by the travel ban outside of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Demonstrators gather outside of John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) airport to protest U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order blocking visitors from seven predominantly Muslim nations in New York, U.S., on Saturday, Jan. 28, 2017. Friday's executive order suspending refugee resettlements and barring entry to people from seven Middle East nations, is 'not a Muslim ban,' President Trump said. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Lawyers work on paperwork for family members of passengers effected by the travel ban outside of the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Sarah Saedian speaks with an attorney about her Iranian relatives as lawyers work to help family members of passengers effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Hossein Khoshbakhty speaks during an interview about his Iranian brother, a U.S. Green Card holder effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Hossein Khoshbakhty, (L), speaks with attorney Talia Inlender about his Iranian family members effected by the travel ban as Homa Homaei, (2nd L), looks on outside the U.S. Customs and Border Protection office at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Sarah Saedian holds a bouquet of roses as she speaks with attorneys about her Iranian relatives working to help her family members effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Hossein Khoshbakhty speaks during an interview about his Iranian brother, a U.S. Green Card holder effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
Attorney Talia Inlender, (R), speaks with Hossein Khoshbakhty, (L), and Homa Homaei, family members of Iranian passengers effected by the travel ban at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Patrick T. Fallon
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Similarly, in an internal memo from Uber CEO Travis Kalanick obtained by a New York Times reporter and posted on Twitter, the ride sharing company voiced its concerns and pledged to support its workers who are being impacted by the new policy.

"Our People ops team has already reached out to the dozen or so employees who we know are affected," Kalanick's memo states, just after outlining the details of the new policy.

"This order has far broader implications as it also affects thousands of drivers who use Uber and come from the listed countries ... We are working out a process to identify these drivers and compensate them pro bono during the next three months to help mitigate some of the financial stress and complications with supporting their families ... We will have more details on this in the coming days."

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings took to Facebook on Saturday to voice his opposition to the policy.

"Trump's actions are hurting Netflix employees around the world, and are so un-American it pains us all," wrote Hastings. "Worse, these actions will make America less safe (through hatred and loss of allies) rather than more safe. A very sad week, and more to come with the lives of over 600,000 Dreamers here in a America under imminent threat. It is time to link arms together to protect American values of freedom and opportunity."

Finally, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey added a brief but potent statement against the new Trump immigration policy.

"The Executive Order's humanitarian and economic impact is real and upsetting," wrote Dorsey, linking to a similar statement from the Internet Association on Twitter. "We benefit from what refugees and immigrants bring to the U.S."

Since the travel ban, which prohibits entry into the U.S. for 90 days for people from Iran, Libya, Sudan, Syria, Iraq, Yemen and Somalia, was announced, a number of civil rights groups, politicians and celebrities have spoken out on social media against the policy. However, despite the powerful internal messages, leading tech brand Apple has remained mostly silent on public platforms.

Nevertheless, Cook, who, along with other leading tech CEOs, met with Trump just after the election, appears ready to resist the new policy in whatever he can.

"Apple is open. Open to everyone, no matter where they come from, which language they speak, who they love or how they worship," wrote Cook, according to the report. "Our employees represent the finest talent in the world, and our team hails from every corner of the globe. In the words of Dr. Martin Luther King, 'We may have all come on different ships, but we are in the same boat now.'"

BONUS: Apple CEO Tim Cook's Push for Non-Discrimination and Other News You Need to Know

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