Samsung announces what caused the Galaxy Note 7 to overheat and explode

Samsung says bad battery design and a rush to release an updated version of the Galaxy Note 7 caused some of the devices to overheat and explode in a new report the company released Sunday night.

Samsung said in the report that two separate battery malfunctions caused some Note 7 phones to overheat and even catch fire in some cases.

The first problem affected the first batch of Note 7 phones that launched last fall. In those phones, the battery was too large for the casing of the phone, which caused some to overheat, according to Samsung's report.

After Samsung recalled the initial batch of Note 7 phones, it manufactured the phone with a battery from a different supplier. But Samsung was in a rush to get the new phones out, and the new battery produced by the supplier had a defect that also caused it to overheat, the report said.

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Models hold Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Note 4 smartphones, far left and far right, and Galaxy Note Edge smartphones, center, for display during the launch event for the Galaxy Note 4, Galaxy Gear S smartwatch and Gear Virtual-Reality (VR) headset in Seoul, South Korea, on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Samsung will start selling its latest Galaxy Note 4 smartphone in South Korea via 3 local mobile operators from Sept. 26 and will complete global release in 140 different markets by October. Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An employee demonstrates using a Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Note 4 smartphone during the launch event for the Galaxy Note 4, Galaxy Gear S smartwatch and Gear Virtual-Reality (VR) headset in Seoul, South Korea, on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Samsung will start selling its latest Galaxy Note 4 smartphone in South Korea via 3 local mobile operators from Sept. 26 and will complete global release in 140 different markets by October. Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Samsung Galaxy Note Edge
Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Gear S smartwatches sit on display during the launch event for the Galaxy Gear S, Galaxy Note 4 smartphone and Gear Virtual-Reality (VR) headset in Seoul, South Korea, on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Samsung will start selling its latest Galaxy Note 4 smartphone in South Korea via 3 local mobile operators from Sept. 26 and will complete global release in 140 different markets by October. Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Samsung Electronics Co. Galaxy Gear S smartwatch sits on display during the launch event for the Galaxy Gear S, Galaxy Note 4 smartphone and Gear Virtual-Reality (VR) headset in Seoul, South Korea, on Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. Samsung will start selling its latest Galaxy Note 4 smartphone in South Korea via 3 local mobile operators from Sept. 26 and will complete global release in 140 different markets by October. Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 03: The Samsung Gear S smart watch sits on display at a media launch event on September 3, 2014 in New York City. The Gear S is the fourth smart watch Samsung has released in a year. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
A Samsung Galaxy K Zoom smartphone sits on a tripod at the IFA Consumer Electronics Show in Berlin, Germany, on Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. Samsung unveiled its first smartphone with a display extending down one side as it counts on two new versions of its Galaxy Note devices to help fend off Apple Inc.'s push into large-screen mobiles. Photographer: Krizstian Bocsi/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A Barnes & Noble Inc. employee demonstrates the new Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 Nook at a Barnes & Noble store in New York, U.S., on Wednesday, Aug. 20, 2014. Barnes & Noble Inc. began selling a Nook-branded tablet made by Samsung Electronics Co., aiming to use the South Korean companys technology prowess to challenge Amazon.com Inc.s Kindle in the electronic-reader market. Photographer: Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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In the end, Samsung ended up recalling all Note 7 phones and canceled the product altogether.

Samsung says it has developed a new eight-point battery check to make sure future devices don't suffer the same fate as the Galaxy Note 7. The test includes an X-ray of the phone and extreme testing conditions that force the battery to work harder than normal.

The company also formed a new group of third-party battery advisors that includes professors from the University of Cambridge, UC Berkeley, and Stanford University.

Now that Samsung knows what caused the problem with the Note 7, it has the unique challenge of proving its devices can be trusted moving forward.

The company says it now has the processes in place to make sure its phones don't overheat and catch fire again, but after months of speculation, the world will have to wait for its next device to see if Samsung can follow through. The company is expected to release its next flagship phone, the Galaxy S8, this spring.

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