Most Borrowers Don't Think Trump Will Be So Bad for Their Student Loans

Nearly 40% of student loan borrowers are concerned that Donald Trump's administration will negatively impact their student loans, according to a new survey from Student Loan Hero. As the country moves into a new era of governance, some graduates are concerned that an already-difficult student debt situation will get worse.

In fact, more than one-fourth (26.6%) of survey respondents admitted they believe a Trump administration will have a "very negative" effect on their student loans. On the other hand, about 40% said they think Trump will have neither a positive nor a negative effect on their student loans, and the remaining respondents (about 20%) said they think he will have a somewhat or very positive effect on their student loans.

These figures come from a poll conducted by Google Consumer Surveys on behalf of Student Loan Hero from Jan. 6 to 9, and the results are based on a nationally representative sample of 1,001 adults with student loans living in the United States.

In the last few years, there's been quite a lot said about the growing student loan crisis. But what can be done? Student loan borrowers have some idea of policy changes they'd like to see implemented during the Trump administration.

RELATED: Student loan debt across America:

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NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 13: Students hold placards as they stage a demonstration at the Hunter College, which is a part of New York City University, to protest ballooning student loan debt for higher education and rally for tuition-free public colleges in New York on November 13, 2015. (Photo by Cem Ozdel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 13: Students hold placards as they stage a demonstration at the Hunter College, which is a part of New York City University, to protest ballooning student loan debt for higher education and rally for tuition-free public colleges in New York on November 13, 2015. (Photo by Cem Ozdel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Students protest the rising costs of student loans for higher education on Hollywood Boulevard on September 22, 2012 in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, California. Citing bank bailouts, the protesters called for student debt cancelations. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: A woman holds a placard on Hollywood Boulevard while protesting the rising costs of student loans for higher education on September 22, 2012 in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, California. Citing bank bailouts, the protesters called for student debt cancelations. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 13: Students hold placards as they stage a demonstration at the Hunter College, which is a part of New York City University, to protest ballooning student loan debt for higher education and rally for tuition-free public colleges in New York on November 13, 2015. (Photo by Cem Ozdel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Students protest the rising costs of student loans for higher education on Hollywood Boulevard on September 22, 2012 in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, California. Citing bank bailouts, the protesters called for student debt cancelations. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 13: Students hold placards as they stage a demonstration at the Hunter College, which is a part of New York City University, to protest ballooning student loan debt for higher education and rally for tuition-free public colleges in New York on November 13, 2015. (Photo by Cem Ozdel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 13: Students stage a demonstration at the Hunter College, which is a part of New York City University, to protest ballooning student loan debt for higher education and rally for tuition-free public colleges in New York on November 13, 2015. (Photo by Cem Ozdel/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Students protest the rising costs of student loans for higher education on Hollywood Boulevard on September 22, 2012 in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, California. Citing bank bailouts, the protesters called for student debt cancelations. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 22: Students protest the rising costs of student loans for higher education on Hollywood Boulevard on September 22, 2012 in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, California. Citing bank bailouts, the protesters called for student debt cancelations. (Photo by David McNew/Getty Images)
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Borrowers Want More Student Loan Forgiveness Options

When asked which student loan changes they would like to see implemented under Trump's administration, nearly half (44.3%) of respondents chose "federal loan forgiveness after 15 years." In a speech during his campaign, Trump mentioned something along those lines, proposing a repayment plan in which borrowers pay 12.5% of their income for 15 years, after which any remaining balance would be forgiven. (Whether or not that's a viable proposal is another matter.)

Currently, student loan borrowers can have their loans forgiven after 20 to 25 years of payments on a federal income-driven repayment plan. There is also a program for federal student loan forgiveness after 10 years in a qualifying public service job (only payments made after Oct. 1, 2007 count). Additionally, borrowers in certain industries can qualify for partial loan forgiveness. However, not everyone qualifies for these forgiveness programs; of those who do, not all will actually have any debt left over by the time the repayment term is up.

It's not surprising many student loan borrowers expressed interest in a federal loan forgiveness program that discharges student debt after 15 years. According to the survey, 25% of respondents have either stopped making student loan payments or have lowered the amount they put toward repayment in the hope that the government will forgive student loan debt in the future.

Borrowers Also Want Refinancing Options

Student loan borrowers aren't just asking for forgiveness. Close to one-third of respondents (31.4%) would like to see a program to refinance federal student loans implemented during a Trump administration.

Currently, it's only possible to refinance through private lenders — the federal government doesn't offer a refinancing option. The problem is that refinancing federal loans with a private lender means losing access to federal protections such as income-based repayment, deferment, forbearance and some forgiveness programs. Not to mention, borrowers are subject to credit checks and other underwriting criteria that's at the discretion of each individual lender.

A federal refinancing program could help more borrowers gain access to refinancing options, retain their federal benefits and allow them reduce their interest charges.

How Much Debt Do Student Loan Borrowers Have?

Addressing student loan debt is likely to be on the radar for the incoming administration, especially with nearly $1.4 trillion in student loan debt outstanding.

According to the survey, more than one-third (36.4%) of student loan borrowers have more than $30,000 in debt. Nearly one-fifth (19%) have more than $50,000 in student loan debt. Interestingly, 7.5% of the survey's respondents aren't even aware of how much debt they have.

It's yet to be seen how Trump or Betsy DeVos, his nominee for Secretary of Education, will handle what many consider to be a crisis, but the consensus seems to be that something needs to be done. In response to a request for elaboration on Trump's student loan repayment proposal, a spokeswoman from his transition team said, "If confirmed, the Secretary designate looks forward to working with the President-elect, the Congress and other stakeholders to address the issues of student debt and repayment."

No matter who is president, student loan debt can seriously impact your financial situation, including your credit score. (You can see just how much by reviewing the two free credit scores you can get through Credit.com, which are updated every 14 days.) Knowing your options when it comes to student loan repayment and refinancing will be crucial over the next four years and beyond.

More from Credit.com:
3 Little-Known Facts About Student Loan Debt
How Do Student Loans Impact Your Credit?
4 Ways to Pay Off Your Student Loans Faster

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