Is minimalism right for you?

I must say, I'm loving this whole Minimalism movement. If you are a hardcore Minimalist, I'll warn you now. I'm much more of a moderate. I'll be the first to tell you that I'm not trying to live out of a book-bag. Yet, committing to simplicity is freeing and LESS REALLY IS MORE.

My own definition of Minimalism is to only buy/own things that will add value to your life. There are no "rules" to it.

"The things you own end up owning you." ― Joshua Fields Millburn

What Have I Done?

Ever since being exposed to the recent film "Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things", I've thrown out about 10 garbage bags of crap I don't need. More specifically, items that weren't adding value to my life. Most of it were made up of the following:

  • Free T-Shirts that accumulated over a number of years
  • Clothing, some of which were really old Christmas gifts that never made it into my regular rotation
  • Useless gadgets or decorative pieces that take up room
  • A ridiculous amount of cups and plates
  • A collection of DVD's I bought in my teens that I will never watch again
  • Golf Clubs
  • Unneeded paperwork
  • Books that I don't think add much value

    "I'm not trying to tell you how to do it, I'm just telling you how I do it & you can use it as a proxy" – Gary Vaynerchuck

I've never considered myself a material person yet getting rid of some of these items were tougher than expected. "I'll keep this just in case" or "I'll save this for (insert name here)" were common thoughts throughout the process. I came to the decision to just get rid of it, right then and there. If not, they will just keep taking up space until I finally take some action.

The truth is:

  1. I don't need 18 plates and cups for 2 people.
  2. I don't play golf anymore. I have one too many hobbies as it is.
  3. I haven't watched a DVD is a LONG time.
  4. Most of my new books are on Amazon Kindle.
  5. I don't need to keep client files more than 7 years.
  6. I've rarely been given a free t-shirt where I think "I'm totally wearing this out." One t-shirt I threw out said "Talk Derby To Me". It came with my admission to a horse race.

Though, I don't live a stressful life, I believe little daily stressors can take a toll on us.

Rather than digging past 14 articles of clothing I haven't worn in years, I can just grab and go with the ones worn most often. Even just seeing clutter go away has eased my mind. Next on my list is to mount the TV and get rid of the stand, whose prior use was to house the 50 DVD's I once proudly owned.

Side Note: The Minimalist mindset & de-cluttering makes it easier to clean. There are less things to move out the way.

This commitment to simplicity has made it's way into my spending habits. I thought my budget was bare bones until I realized I was paying for things that I don't care about. Cable was the biggest culprit! Look out for a post later this week on Cable. The Millennial generation has had enough!

Take a listen to "The Minimalist Podcast" by Joshua Fields Millburn and Ryan Nicodemus. It's a refreshing look at life through a different lens.

Why Did I Do This?

I've made this commitment for these reasons:

  1. I truly value people, experience, and conversation rather than material possession.
  2. Moving residences in the past made me realize how easily things pile up
  3. I wonder how much more productive I can be without useless products and services
  4. I think it's a better financial decision. Think of how many thousands of dollars those 10 trash bags were worth?

The post Minimalism and Commitment to Simplicity appeared first on Jiu-Jitsu Finance.

RELATED: Japanese minimalist movement

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Japanese minimalist movement
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Japanese minimalist movement
Utensils lie in a kitchen drawer in the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Minimalist Naoki Numahata talks to his two-and-a-half year old daughter Ei in their living-room in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Minimalist Saeko Kushibiki stores away her futon mattress in her apartment in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A kettle sits on a cooker in the kitchen of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Two-and-a-half year old Ei, the daughter of minimalist Naoki Numahata, sits in the family living-room in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A kitchen counter is seen in the apartment of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Books sit on a bookshelf in the home of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
An open kitchen drawer is seen in the apartment of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Toothbrushes are seen in the bathroom of the apartment of minimalist Naoki Numahata in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A sponge hangs in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Toys belonging to two-and-a-half year old Ei, the daughter of minimalist Naoki Numahata, are scattered across the floor in her family's living-room in Tokyo, Japan, March 4, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A razor and toothbrush lie in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
The contents of the fridge is seen at the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Minimalist Katsuya Toyoda demonstrates how he sleeps in his room in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A yoga mat and shorts are seen in the room of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Belongings lie in a drawer in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Clothes hang in the wardrobe of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Kitchen utensils hang in the home of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
The bathroom cupboard of minimalist Fumio Sasaki is seen in Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A tray lies on a table in the living room of minimalist Katsuya Toyoda in Tokyo, Japan, March 5, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A laptop belonging to minimalist Fumio Sasaki sits on his desk in Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter SEARCH "MINIMALISM" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "THE WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES
Minimalist Fumio Sasaki uses a wet wipe to clean the floor in his room in Tokyo, Japan, February 19, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
A living room window is seen in the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Soap sits in a dish at the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Glasses and spices sit on a shelf in the apartment of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter
Minimalist Saeko Kushibiki demonstrates where she reads in her room in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Clothes hang in a wardrobe in the home of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
Glasses and cups sit on a shelf in the apartment of minimalist Saeko Kushibiki in Fujisawa, south of Tokyo, Japan, March 31, 2016. REUTERS/Thomas Peter 
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