13 states that tax Social Security benefits

Many retirees are surprised when state taxes crack their nest egg right open.

In addition to local tariffs like sales tax and property tax, some states even tax Social Security benefits, the most critical source of income for many American retirees.

To help you better budget and plan, click through the slideshow below for 13 states that tax Social Security as of 2016.

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The 13 states that tax Social Security benefits
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The 13 states that tax Social Security benefits

Colorado

(Adventure_Photo via Getty Images)

Connecticut

(SeanPavonePhoto via Getty Images)

Kansas

(Davel5957 via Getty Images)

Minnesota

(Davel5957 via Getty Images)

Missouri

(JByard via Getty Images)

Montana

(Ron Reiring via Getty Images)

Nebraska

(Walter Bibikow via Getty Images)

New Mexico

(Joel Bennett via Getty Images)

North Dakota

(Ben Harding)

Rhode Island

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Utah

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Vermont

(DenisTangneyJr via Getty Images)

West Virginia

(DarrenFisher via Getty Images)

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But don't let the above list impact your retirement planning too much. Despite their taxes on Social Security, Colorado and West Virginia are actually quite tax-friendly to retirees. It's always best to weigh the entire tax picture before deciding where to settle down in retirement.

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