L.L. Bean is facing a boycott after its founder's granddaughter donated to a pro-Trump PAC

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L.L. Bean has said that it likes to stay out of politics. But Linda Bean, granddaughter of the company's founder, Leon Leonwood Bean, is clearly an exception.

The 75-year-old frequent contributor to conservative causes made a $60,000 donation to a Trump-supporting PAC called Making America Great Again LLC, according to the AP.

One problem: individual donations to PACs registered as supporting one candidate are limited to only $5,000.

The group spent $66,862 in support of Trump overall.

The Federal Election Commission told the group it could face an audit or punitive action if it doesn't respond, according to a letter obtained by the AP. In response, the group says it will seek to re-register as a super PAC that is allowed to raise unlimited funds from individual donors. The PAC's chairman, David Jones, told the AP that he thought it was already registered as such.

See photos of the original L.L. Bean and more:

25 PHOTOS
History of L.L. Bean through photos
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History of L.L. Bean through photos
Mail order co. founder Leon Leonwood (L. L.) Bean testing wooden duck decoys. (Photo by George Strock/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
Mail order co. founder Leon Leonwood (L. L.) Bean w. his grandchildren (L-R) Leon, Tom & Jimmy Gorman. (Photo by George Strock/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
American clothier and buisnessman Leon Leonwood Bean (1872 - 1967), founder of the L.L. Bean clothing retailer, sits in office with his grandchildren, from left, Leon, Jimmy, and Tom Gorman, Freeport, Maine, 1941. (Photo by George Strock/The LIFE Picture Collection/Getty Images)
L.L. Bean Co. mail-order clothing catalogue open to page advertising pajamas and robes. (Photo by James Keyser/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
Employee at the L.L. Bean distribution center filling a mail order. (Photo by Steve Liss/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty Images)
STAFF PHOTO BY DOUG JONES -- Thursday, September 2, 1999 -- One of LL bean's early if not original issue of the boot that made the company famous sits in the foreground complete with reddish rubber lower contrasted with the latest generation of the famous footware. (Photo by Doug Jones/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
SLUG-HX/LLBEAN--DATE-4/26/2001--LOCATION-Columbia Mall, Columbia, Maryland--PHOTOGRAPHER-MARVIN JOSEPH/TWP--CAPTION- LL Bean's second free-standing store will open May 4, 2001 at the Columbia Mall. PICTURED, Construction workers are putting the finishing touches on the new LL Bean store. (Photo by Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images)
STAFF PHOTO BY JACK MILTON, Friday, January 4, 2002: L.L. Bean's Freeport store. (Photo by Jack Milton/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FREEPORT, ME - NOVEMBER 28: (L-R) Pam McLaughlin, Jenny Leeman and Jackie Merrill fill boxes with customer's orders in the L.L. Bean shipping center on 'Cyber Monday,' the online retail world's version of Black Friday, November 28, 2005 in Freeport, Maine. L.L. Bean reported a surge in on-line shoppers today as consumers continue to buy holiday gifts. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Staff Photo by Shawn Patrick Ouellette, Sunday, June 18, 2006: Jim and Penny Pace of Birminham Alabama look over LL Bean tee shirts at the Freeport store Sunday. (Photo by Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
DEDHAM, MA - OCTOBER 14: The LL Bean store at the new Legacy Place in Dedham features a giant boot outside. (Photo by Bill Greene/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
LONDON, UNITED KINGDOM - FEBRUARY 21: Vintage boots by LL Bean and jeans by B2B (Taipei) worn by artist Hommy Ltu during London Fashion Week Autumn/Winter 2012 at on February 21, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by Catherine Farrell/WireImage)
L.L. Bean now offers 55 versions of it's iconic hunting boot in a variety of colors including these colorfull moccasin versions of the shoe. -- Friday, February 7, 2014. (Photo by John Ewing/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
Cut out pieces of leather sit in piles before being made into boots at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Cut out pieces of leather sits in piles before being made into boots at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A worker uses a die-cutting machine to cut out shapes of leather to be sewn into boots at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A worker uses a die-cutting machine to cut out shapes of leather to be sewn into boots at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Workers use a die-cutting machine to cut out shapes of leather to be sewn into boots at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Signage stands outside the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Workers make boots at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Finished boots sit before being packaged and shipped at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A worker packages boots for shipping at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A worker packages boots for shipping at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A worker adds a triple stitch to boots at the L.L. Bean Inc. manufacturing facility in Brunswick, Maine, U.S., on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015. Over 450 people are employed at L.L. Bean Inc.'s Maine factory where approximately 1,300 pairs of boots per day are manufactured. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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The incident has brought on scrutiny of L.L. Bean, which is famous for its weatherproof shoes and outdoor gear. The brand is now facing a boycott by the "Grab Your Wallet" group, which has focused on avoiding products made by companies that support Trump, or by companies with owners who have publicly supported Trump.

L.L. Bean responded to the boycott in a Facebook post statement written by its executive chairman, Shawn Gorman, who notes that Linda Bean is only one of more than 50 family members involved in the company.

"No individual alone speaks on behalf of the business or represents the values of the company that [founder] L.L. built," the statement read. "L.L.Bean does not endorse political candidates, take positions on political matters, or make political contributions. Simply put, we stay out of politics. To be included in this boycott campaign is simply misguided, and we respectfully request that Grab Your Wallet reverse its position."

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