Wells Fargo fined $24M for illegally seizing military members' cars

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Wells Fargo is in big trouble again.

The company will pay more than $24 million in fines for improperly repossessing cars owned by U.S. military members.

The Justice Department announced Thursday that Wells Fargo had agreed to pay over $4.1 million to settle allegations that it repossessed 413 cars without getting a court order first.

The bank was fined another $20 million by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency for the same thing.

Learn more about the embattled Wells Fargo CEO:

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Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
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Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
John Stumpf, President and CEO of Wells Fargo, participates in a panel at the 2015 Fortune Global Forum in San Francisco, California November 2, 2015. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf speaks during a news conference for Wachovia employees at the Wachovia corporate headquarters in Charlotte, North Carolina, October 15, 2008. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES)
TARP recipient financial institution leaders testify before House Financial Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, February 11, 2009. From left are, Goldman Sachs' Lloyd Blankfein, JPMorgan Chase's Jamie Dimon, Bank of New York's Robert Kelly, Bank of America's Ken Lewis,State Street's Ronald Logue, Morgan Stanley's John Mack, Citi's Vikram Pandit, and Wells Fargo's John Stumpf. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf testifies before a Senate Banking Committee hearing on the firm's sales practices on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 20: John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of the Wells Fargo & Company, prepares for testimony before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee September 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. The committee heard testimony on the topic of 'An Examination of Wells Fargo's Unauthorized Accounts and the Regulatory Response.' (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
John Stumpf, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Wells Fargo & Co., speaks at the Bloomberg Year Ahead: 2014 conference in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013. Stumpf said he dislikes Federal Reserve monthly bond purchases at this point in the economic cycle and that the policy has hurt savers. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 30: Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf (L) speaks with Wall Street Journal Editor in Chief Gerry Baker on FOX Business Networks' 'Opening Bell With Maria Bartiromo' at FOX Studios on April 30, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Monica Schipper/Getty Images)
John Stumpf, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Wells Fargo & Co., speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, May 7, 2015. Wells Fargo, the fourth-biggest U.S. bank by assets and the nation's leading home lender, in March left Stumpf's pay unchanged at $19.3 million after the firm generated a bigger profit than any other U.S. bank for a second straight year. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
John Stumpf, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Wells Fargo & Co., listens to a question during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, May 7, 2015. Wells Fargo, the fourth-biggest U.S. bank by assets and the nation's leading home lender, in March left Stumpf's pay unchanged at $19.3 million after the firm generated a bigger profit than any other U.S. bank for a second straight year. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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An investigation conducted by the DOJ found the violations had taken place for more than seven years, ending in 2015.

The first complaint came from a member of the Army National Guard, which accused Wells Fargo of seizing his car while he was getting ready to deploy to Afghanistan.

The department says the bank then auctioned off the vehicle and tried to collect $10,000 in an unpaid balance from his family.

The settlement comes as Wells Fargo deals with a scandal involving millions of fake bank and credit card accounts.

SEE MORE: Wells Fargo's Scandal Costs Its CEO Millions — Which Isn't Much To Him

In fact, the company's CEO faced angry lawmakers at a hearing on Capitol Hill just hours before the fines were announced.

On top of the $24 million in fines, Wells Fargo is also facing lawsuits from customers, shareholders and former employees.

See the Wells Fargo CEO face angry lawmakers on Capitol Hill:

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Elizabeth Warren questions Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
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Elizabeth Warren questions Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf arrives to testify before a Senate Banking Committee hearing on the firm's sales practices on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) questions Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf (not pictured) during his testimony before a Senate Banking Committee hearing on the firm's sales practices on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron
US Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, questions John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, as he testifies about the unauthorized opening of accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 20, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Senator Elizabeth Warren, a Democrat from Massachusetts, left, speaks with Senator Joe Donnelly, a Democrat from Indiana, before John Stumpf, chief executive officer of Wells Fargo & Co., not pictured, testifies in front of the Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. Stumpf, struggling to quell public rancor after the bank's employees opened unauthorized accounts for legions of customers, said the company has expanded its review of the matter to include 2009 and 2010. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
US Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, questions John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, as he testifies about the unauthorized opening of accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 20, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
US Senator Elizabeth Warren, Democrat of Massachusetts, holds up copies of Wells Fargo earnings call transcripts as she questions John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of Wells Fargo, as he testifies about the unauthorized opening of accounts by Wells Fargo during a Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 20, 2016. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 20: Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., talk before a Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing in Dirksen on unauthorized accounts opened under customers 'names at Wells Fargo featuring testimony by CEO John Stumpf, September 20, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 20: From left, Sens. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Joe Donnelly, D-Ind., attend a Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs hearing in Dirksen Building on unauthorized accounts opened under customers' names at Wells Fargo featuring testimony by CEO John Stumpf, September 20, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
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