Closing your fake Wells Fargo credit card can actually damage your bank account

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Most people know that opening a new credit card will inevitably affect your credit score, for better or for worse.

It goes without saying, then, that closing an account would also have an affect on your credit score.

SEE ALSO: Former employees file class action against Wells Fargo

But what happens if your bank opened up a fake account in your name – do you cancel the account or leave the fake account in your name?

What might sound like an easy answer to a question that never should be posed in the first place might not be that easy to answer after all.

And for the more than 2 million victims of the Wells Fargo scandal, this is a dilemma they're currently facing.

Here's the quick rundown: When Wells Fargo opened credit cards in customers' names without telling them, their credit scores rose (without them knowing).

How is that possible?

When your bank allows you to open a credit card (especially if you already have multiple open, which most customer's most likely had), it shows that your bank trusts you to responsibly spend and pay off more money.

On top of that, opening a new credit card expands your available credit.

If you have a card open in your name that you're unaware of, you're not using it, so it looks to banks as if you're minimizing the amount of available credit you're actually using.

See the dilemma?

The answer as to what to do depends on whether or not you're in need of good credit.

Sean McQuay of NerdWallet told Yahoo Finance:

"Keeping a relic of Wells Fargo's misconduct on your credit report might feel weird, but if there's a silver lining I'd take it."

Bottom line? If you're planning on making a hefty purchase in the near future where you'll need a loan, say a mortgage or car, your fraudulent incident might not be such a bad thing after all.

RELATED: Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf

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Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
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Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf
John Stumpf, President and CEO of Wells Fargo, participates in a panel at the 2015 Fortune Global Forum in San Francisco, California November 2, 2015. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage
Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf speaks during a news conference for Wachovia employees at the Wachovia corporate headquarters in Charlotte, North Carolina, October 15, 2008. REUTERS/Chris Keane (UNITED STATES)
TARP recipient financial institution leaders testify before House Financial Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, February 11, 2009. From left are, Goldman Sachs' Lloyd Blankfein, JPMorgan Chase's Jamie Dimon, Bank of New York's Robert Kelly, Bank of America's Ken Lewis,State Street's Ronald Logue, Morgan Stanley's John Mack, Citi's Vikram Pandit, and Wells Fargo's John Stumpf. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf testifies before a Senate Banking Committee hearing on the firm's sales practices on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 20, 2016. REUTERS/Gary Cameron TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 20: John Stumpf, chairman and CEO of the Wells Fargo & Company, prepares for testimony before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee September 20, 2016 in Washington, DC. The committee heard testimony on the topic of 'An Examination of Wells Fargo's Unauthorized Accounts and the Regulatory Response.' (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
John Stumpf, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Wells Fargo & Co., speaks at the Bloomberg Year Ahead: 2014 conference in Chicago, Illinois, U.S., on Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2013. Stumpf said he dislikes Federal Reserve monthly bond purchases at this point in the economic cycle and that the policy has hurt savers. Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 30: Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf (L) speaks with Wall Street Journal Editor in Chief Gerry Baker on FOX Business Networks' 'Opening Bell With Maria Bartiromo' at FOX Studios on April 30, 2015 in New York City. (Photo by Monica Schipper/Getty Images)
John Stumpf, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Wells Fargo & Co., speaks during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, May 7, 2015. Wells Fargo, the fourth-biggest U.S. bank by assets and the nation's leading home lender, in March left Stumpf's pay unchanged at $19.3 million after the firm generated a bigger profit than any other U.S. bank for a second straight year. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
John Stumpf, chairman, president and chief executive officer of Wells Fargo & Co., listens to a question during an interview in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, May 7, 2015. Wells Fargo, the fourth-biggest U.S. bank by assets and the nation's leading home lender, in March left Stumpf's pay unchanged at $19.3 million after the firm generated a bigger profit than any other U.S. bank for a second straight year. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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