DNA test proves former Belgian king fathered illegitimate child 52 years ago

After a lengthy seven-year battle, the former King of Belgium has finally acknowledged that Delphine Boël is his biological daughter.

The former King Albert II, who abdicated the throne in 2013, has been adamant against Boël's claims over the years. However, the results of a paternity test released on Monday have proved that the 85-year-old royal is her father. 

The monarch is said to have had an affair with Boël's mother, Sibylle de Selys Longchamps, in Greece in the 1960s. Because the two were not married to each other, the 52-year-old Boël is considered illegitimate and will not receive a title nor a place in line to the throne. 

Lawyers for the former king released a statement to the Belgian media acknowledging the paternity test and calling the extensive lawsuit a "painful procedure."

"Even though there are arguments and legal objections to justify that legal paternity does not necessarily mean biological paternity, and that the procedure used seems to him disputable, King Albert has decided not to use those arguments and to end with honor and dignity this painful procedure," Albert's lawyer, Alain Berenboom, said.

"Legally, he will end the legal battle there and accept that Delphine Boël is his fourth child," it said. 

Boël first came forward with the claims in 2005. In 2018, five years after she began legal action, a Brussels court ordered the royal to submit to a paternity test, which he initially rejected. He was fined every day he refused to submit to the test. 

According to reports, Albert knew about Boël's birth but cut all ties with the family when he became king in 1993. 

The royal has been married to Paola Ruffo di Calabria since 1959. They share three children, including the current King of Belgium, King Philippe.

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King Albert II's paternity case
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King Albert II's paternity case
Belgian artist Delphine Boel, who claims King Albert II of Belgium is her biological father, is seen prior to a hearing at the Cassation Court, on December 13, 2019 in Brussels, following the demand of King Albert II to contest an arrest of Brussels appeal court which established that Jacques Boel is not the father of Delphine Boel and which asks for King Albert II to take a DNA test. (Photo by DIRK WAEM / BELGA / AFP) / Belgium OUT (Photo by DIRK WAEM/BELGA/AFP via Getty Images)
Belgian artist Delphine Boel pictured during a session at the Cassation Court following the demand of King Albert II to contest the arrest of Brussels appeal court from 25 October 2018 which established that Jacques Boel is not the father of Delphine Boel and which asks for King Albert II to make a DNA test with wich Delphine Boel intends to prove she is Albert II's biological daughter, Friday 29 November 2019, in Brussels. BELGA PHOTO LAURIE DIEFFEMBACQ (Photo by LAURIE DIEFFEMBACQ/BELGA MAG/AFP via Getty Images)
Belgian artist Delphine Boel and Lawyer Yves-Henri Leleu arrive at the cassation court on November 29, 2019, in Brussels, after King Albert II contested the decision of Brussels appeal court establishing Jacques Boel is not the father of Delphine Boel and asking for a DNA test to prove Mrs Boel is Albert II's biological daughter. (Photo by LAURIE DIEFFEMBACQ / BELGA / AFP) / Belgium OUT (Photo by LAURIE DIEFFEMBACQ/BELGA/AFP via Getty Images)
Lawyer Yves-Henri Leleu, Belgian artist Delphine Boel and Lawyer Marc Uyttendaele arrive at the cassation court on November 29, 2019, in Brussels, after King Albert II contested the decision of Brussels appeal court establishing Jacques Boel is not the father of Delphine Boel and asking for a DNA test to prove Mrs Boel is Albert II's biological daughter. (Photo by LAURIE DIEFFEMBACQ / BELGA / AFP) / Belgium OUT (Photo by LAURIE DIEFFEMBACQ/BELGA/AFP via Getty Images)
Belgian artist Delphine Boel and Lawyer Marc Uyttendaele leave after a session at the Appeal Court in the appeal in the case of Delphine Boel to contest the paternity of her father Jacques Boel and to ask for the recognition of the paternity of King Albert II, Thursday 28 March 2019, in Brussels. Boel intends to prove she is Albert II's biological daughter. BELGA PHOTO NICOLAS MAETERLINCK (Photo credit should read NICOLAS MAETERLINCK/AFP via Getty Images)
Belgian artist Delphine Boel and Lawyer Marc Uyttendaele leave after a session at the Appeal Court in the appeal in the case of Delphine Boel to contest the paternity of her father Jacques Boel and to ask for the recognition of the paternity of King Albert II, Thursday 28 March 2019, in Brussels. Boel intends to prove she is Albert II's biological daughter. BELGA PHOTO NICOLAS MAETERLINCK (Photo credit should read NICOLAS MAETERLINCK/AFP via Getty Images)
Belgian artist Delphine Boel arrives for a session at the Appeal Court to set the agenda in the appeal of the case, contesting the paternity of her father Jacques Boel and asking for the recognition of the paternity of King Albert II, on April 26, 2018, in Brussels. - Boel intends to prove she is Albert II's biological daughter. (Photo by ERIC LALMAND / Belga / AFP) / Belgium OUT (Photo credit should read ERIC LALMAND/AFP via Getty Images)
Belgian artist Delphine Boel (C) arrives on October 2, 2014 at the Brussels Trial Court of First Instance for the pleadings in her double case to contest the paternity of her father Jacques Boel and to ask for the recognition of the paternity of former Belgian King Albert II. Boel intends to prove she is Albert II's biological daughter. AFP PHOTO / BELGA / ERIC LALMAND - BELGIUM OUT - (Photo credit should read ERIC LALMAND/AFP via Getty Images)
Exclusif pictures of Delphine Boel, natural daughter of king Albert II. Delphine is launching an exhibition of her new original works beginning of september in the gallery Guy Pieters in Knokke. The title of this new serie of art work is "pray harder". The 23rd of september is also starting the beginning of the trial of her proceedings contesting paternity . Delphine would like to prove she is the natural daughter of king Albert II. © Olivier polet (Photo by Olivier Polet/Corbis via Getty Images)
BRUSSELS, BELGIUM - JUNE 25: Lawyers Guy Hiernaux ( Belgian Royals), Francoise De Koster (Mother Delphine) and Alain Bereboom (Belgian Royals) photographed at the Palais de Justice on June 25, 2013 in Brussels, Belgium. Belgian artist Delphine Boel claims to be the illegitimate daughter of King Albert II of Belgium and has launched a legal action in pursuit of her case. (Photo by Mark Renders/Getty Images)
BRUSSELS , BELGIUM - JUNE 25, 2013: (L-R) Francoise Decoster, Guy Hiernaux and Alain Berenboom attends the opening of the lawsuit against King Albert of Belgium at the Palais de Justice on June 25, 2013 in Brussels, Belgium. Delphine Boel , daughter of Sybille de Selys, claims King Albert of Belgium is her father and has opened a lawsuit against him to try to prove she is his daughter. (Photo by Didier Lebrun/Photonews via Getty Images)
Pregnant Delphine Boel (King Albert II's illegitimate daughter) pictured during a press conference where she presented her new book called "Couper le cordon / De navelstreng doorknippen", (Cutting the umbilical cord), an autobiography through her works, on April 9, 2008 in Brussels. AFP PHOTO / BELGA PHOTO DIRK WAEM (Photo credit should read DIRK WAEM/AFP via Getty Images)
Pregnant Delphine Boel (King Albert II's illegitimate daughter) poses with her new book called "Couper le cordon / De navelstreng doorknippen", (Cutting the umbilical cord), an autobiography through her works, on April 9, 2008 in Brussels. AFP PHOTO / BELGA PHOTO DIRK WAEM (Photo credit should read DIRK WAEM/AFP/Getty Images)
Exclusive pictures of Delphine Boel, daughter of King Albert II of Belgium, in her workshop in Brussels. Delphine, Baroness Boel, is a Belgian artist who specializes in papier mache sculpture. She is alleged to be the illegitimate daughter of Albert II of Belgium. (Photo by Olivier Polet/Corbis via Getty Images)
Brussels, BELGIUM: Delphine Boel, illegitimate daughter of King Albert II of Belgium, poses 02 May 2007 at the opening of the "concept" exhibition, in Brussels. Boel traditionally works with paper mache, making sculptures, but has opted for new technologies to create 3D imagery in her latest project exposed at the Salle des Arts from 03 to 13 May 2007. AFP PHOTO / BELGA PHOTO BENOIT DOPPAGNE ***** Belgium OUT*** (Photo credit should read BENOIT DOPPAGNE/AFP via Getty Images)
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