Bette Midler mocks Lori Loughlin's college admissions scandal: 'The judge might put her away for ... hours'

By all accounts, Lori Loughlin is reportedly anguished about the three charges she’s facing over her alleged involvement in the college admissions scheme known as Operation Varsity Blues. Bette Midler, however, thinks that the Full House actress has nothing to worry about — because she’s a celebrity.

On Sunday, Midler took to Twitter to mock Loughlin’s legal woes after the former Hallmark Channel favorite and husband Mossimo Giannulli revealed their plans to plead not guilty to a new charge of conspiring "to commit federal program bribery.” The couple stand accused of paying a college admissions consultant a $500,000 bribe to get their two daughters, Olivia Jade and Bella Giannulli, into USC as crew recruits. Neither of the young women, who are no longer enrolled in USC, are actually involved with the sport.

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Lori Loughlin and Mossimo Giannulli return to court
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Lori Loughlin and Mossimo Giannulli return to court
BOSTON, MA - AUGUST 27: Lori Loughlin and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, right, leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on Aug. 27, 2019. A judge says actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, can continue using a law firm that recently represented the University of Southern California. The couple appeared in Boston federal court on Tuesday to settle a dispute over their choice of lawyers in a sweeping college admissions bribery case. Prosecutors had said their lawyers pose a potential conflict of interest. Loughlin and Giannulli say the firms work for USC was unrelated to the admissions case and was handled by different lawyers. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - AUGUST 27: Lori Loughlin, center, and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, behind her at right, leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on Aug. 27, 2019. A judge says actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, can continue using a law firm that recently represented the University of Southern California. The couple appeared in Boston federal court on Tuesday to settle a dispute over their choice of lawyers in a sweeping college admissions bribery case. Prosecutors had said their lawyers pose a potential conflict of interest. Loughlin and Giannulli say the firms work for USC was unrelated to the admissions case and was handled by different lawyers. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - AUGUST 27: Lori Loughlin, center left, and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, center right, leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on Aug. 27, 2019. A judge says actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, can continue using a law firm that recently represented the University of Southern California. The couple appeared in Boston federal court on Tuesday to settle a dispute over their choice of lawyers in a sweeping college admissions bribery case. Prosecutors had said their lawyers pose a potential conflict of interest. Loughlin and Giannulli say the firms work for USC was unrelated to the admissions case and was handled by different lawyers. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin (C) and husband Mossimo Giannulli (C rear)exit the Boston Federal Court house after a pre-trial hearing with Magistrate Judge Kelley at the John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on August 27, 2019. - Loughlin and Giannulli are charged with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering in the college admissions scandal. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin (C) and husband Mossimo Giannulli (C rear) exit the Boston Federal Court house after a pre-trial hearing with Magistrate Judge Kelley at the John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on August 27, 2019. - Loughlin and Giannulli are charged with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering in the college admissions scandal. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli exit the Boston Federal Court house after a pre-trial hearing with Magistrate Judge Kelley at the John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on August 27, 2019. - Loughlin and Giannulli are charged with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering in the college admissions scandal. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin (C) and husband Mossimo Giannulli (C rear)exit the Boston Federal Court house after a pre-trial hearing with Magistrate Judge Kelley at the John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on August 27, 2019. - Loughlin and Giannulli are charged with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering in the college admissions scandal. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - AUGUST 27: Lori Loughlin, center, and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, behind her at right, leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on Aug. 27, 2019. A judge says actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, can continue using a law firm that recently represented the University of Southern California. The couple appeared in Boston federal court on Tuesday to settle a dispute over their choice of lawyers in a sweeping college admissions bribery case. Prosecutors had said their lawyers pose a potential conflict of interest. Loughlin and Giannulli say the firms work for USC was unrelated to the admissions case and was handled by different lawyers. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - AUGUST 27: Lori Loughlin and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, behind her at left, leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on Aug. 27, 2019. A judge says actress Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli, can continue using a law firm that recently represented the University of Southern California. The couple appeared in Boston federal court on Tuesday to settle a dispute over their choice of lawyers in a sweeping college admissions bribery case. Prosecutors had said their lawyers pose a potential conflict of interest. Loughlin and Giannulli say the firms work for USC was unrelated to the admissions case and was handled by different lawyers. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, arrive at the federal courthouse for a hearing on charges in a nationwide college admissions cheating scheme in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Josh Reynolds
Actress Lori Loughlin, and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli leave the federal courthouse after a hearing on charges in a nationwide college admissions cheating scheme in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., August 27, 2019. REUTERS/Josh Reynolds
Lori Loughlin departs federal court Tuesday, Aug. 27, 2019, in Boston, after a hearing in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
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In a reference to the 14-day prison sentence given to Felicity Huffman for her own role in the admissions scandal — the actress, who admitted paying to have her daughter’s test scores altered, was released after just 11 days — Midler cracked that, if found guilty, Loughlin would serve “hours.”

Midler’s joke echoed the backlash that came with Huffman’s sentencing, which many felt was too light given the substantial sentences for people of color in similar cases. Meghan McCain called the former Desperate Housewives star and husband William H. Macy “the poster children for what everyone hates about white privilege.” And while Loughlin is expected to get more jail time if she is ultimately found guilty, according to the U.S. attorney whose office is prosecuting the case, few of Midler’s fans felt sympathy for the Fuller House star.

Loughlin, who is scheduled for a Nov. 20 arraignment, has at least one person cheering her on: longtime co-star Bob Saget.

“I love the people I love and I have empathy for people that are in my life for 35 years,” the actor told Fox News last week when asked about Loughlin. “I don’t cut people out.”

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