John Legend thinks people are missing the point in complaining about Felicity Huffman’s short prison sentence

John Legend is using his voice to advocate for prison reform.

The “All of Me” singer contended in a series of tweets Saturday that people are missing the point in complaining that actress Felicity Huffman’s 14-day prison sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal is too short.

“I get why everyone gets mad when rich person X gets a short sentence and poor person of color Y gets a long one,” Legend began. “The answer isn’t for X to get more; it’s for both of them to get less (or even none!!!) We should level down not up.”

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Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy arrive for sentencing
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Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy arrive for sentencing
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman arrives with her husband William H. Macy at John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on Sept. 13, 2019. (Photo by Nic Antaya for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman arrives with her husband William H. Macy at John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on Sept. 13, 2019. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman arrives with her husband William H. Macy at John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on Sept. 13, 2019. (Photo by Nic Antaya for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy arrive at John Moakley U.S. Courthousefor Huffman's sentencing hearing for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy arrive at John Moakley U.S. Courthousefor Huffman's sentencing hearing for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way into the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy (L), exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy makes her way to a waiting SUV after leaving the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy (L), exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy (L), exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy exit John Moakley U.S. Courthouse where Huffman received a 14 day sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy exit John Moakley U.S. Courthouse where Huffman received a 14 day sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy (L) exit John Moakley U.S. Courthouse where Huffman received a 14 day sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman arrives with her husband William H. Macy at John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on Sept. 13, 2019. (Photo by Nic Antaya for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
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He then referenced a viral story about a homeless Connecticut woman who received five years behind bars years ago for enrolling her son in a school district where he didn’t live, as well as for unrelated drug charges. That story recently resurfaced, with many comparing her sentence to Huffman’s.

“It’s insane we locked a woman up for 5 years for sending her kid to the wrong school district," Legend tweeted. "Literally everyone involved in that decision should be ashamed of themselves.”

He also wrote that Americans are "desensitized’ to how often people are jailed.

“And no one in our nation will benefit from the 14 days an actress will serve for cheating in college admissions," Legend tweeted. "We don’t need to lock people up for any of this stuff.”

Huffman’s sentence came down Friday after she pleaded guilty to paying to have her daughter’s answers on the SATs corrected.

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