Felicity Huffman asks to serve time at posh California prison near her home

Following Felicity Huffman’s conviction in the Varsity Blues college admissions scandal, lawyers for the actress requested she spend her two-week sentence at a minimum-security, cushy northern California prison.

The Federal Bureau of Prisons will make the ultimate decision, but Huffman’s attorney argued she should be housed at the Federal Correctional Institution at Dublin, Calif., during her stint in the big house so she can see her family.

Attorney Martin Murphy asked Judge Indira Talwani to let Huffman stay at the prison, the closest to her residence.

The Dublin facility was listed as one of Forbes’ 10 cushiest prisons in 2009 saying “proximity to the Bay Area means gorgeous weather and easy travel options for visitors.”

Visitors are allowing between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays, according to the federal prison’s handbook.

Related: Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy arrive for sentencing 

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Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy arrive for sentencing
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Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy arrive for sentencing
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman arrives with her husband William H. Macy at John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on Sept. 13, 2019. (Photo by Nic Antaya for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman arrives with her husband William H. Macy at John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on Sept. 13, 2019. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman arrives with her husband William H. Macy at John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on Sept. 13, 2019. (Photo by Nic Antaya for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy arrive at John Moakley U.S. Courthousefor Huffman's sentencing hearing for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy arrive at John Moakley U.S. Courthousefor Huffman's sentencing hearing for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way to the entrance of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, makes her way into the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse September 13, 2019 in Boston, where she will be sentenced for her role in the College Admissions scandal. - Huffman, one of the defendants charged in the college admissions cheating scandal, is scheduled to be sentenced for paying $15,000 to inflate her daughters SAT scores, a crime she said she committed trying to be a good parent. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy (L), exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy makes her way to a waiting SUV after leaving the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy (L), exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy (L), exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy exit John Moakley U.S. Courthouse where Huffman received a 14 day sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy exit John Moakley U.S. Courthouse where Huffman received a 14 day sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman and husband William Macy (L) exit John Moakley U.S. Courthouse where Huffman received a 14 day sentence for her role in the college admissions scandal on September 13, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 13: Felicity Huffman arrives with her husband William H. Macy at John Joseph Moakley US Courthouse in Boston on Sept. 13, 2019. (Photo by Nic Antaya for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman, escorted by her husband William H. Macy, exits the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, where she was sentenced by Judge Talwani for her role in the College Admissions scandal on September 13, 2019. - Actress Felicity Huffman gets 14 days jail in US college admissions scandal (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
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Huffman will also have access to the extensive commissary available to inmates.

Heidi Fleiss, the “Hollywood Madam,” and Patty Hearst previously served time at Dublin. Prior to becoming a women’s prison, Dublin was the site of a daring rescue when Ronald McIntosh escaped from the prison in October 1986 and hijacked a helicopter to spring his lover Samantha Lopez who was also serving at Dublin.

In the 1990s, Dubin was one of several prisons dubbed “Club Fed” because of the perks available to inmates.

“They come here as punishment, not to be punished," then-warden Constance Roose told the San Francisco Chronicle in 1998.

“We try to encourage the women,” Reese said. “This is an opportunity for them to turn their lives around, and hopefully when they return to the community they won’t return to a life of crime.”

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