Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds donate $2 million to help protect the rights of migrant children

Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds are putting their money and resources to a good cause.

It was announced on Wednesday that the Gossip Girl alum and the Deadpool star made two separate donations of $1 million each to both the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and to the Young Center for Immigrant Children’s Rights.

According to an announcement made by the Young Center, the generous gift will be used to establish the Waymaker Fund for Immigrant Children, which aims to protect and increase the protections for the rights of immigrant children separated from their families at the border and amid increased deportation efforts.

Meanwhile, the donation to the NAACP LDF law firm will help the organization's efforts to promote racial and social justice and equality across the nation through challenging unconstitutional legislation and advocacy litigation.

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Blake Lively debuts baby bump at 'Pikachu' premiere
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Blake Lively debuts baby bump at 'Pikachu' premiere
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 02: Blake Lively attends "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" U.S. Premiere at Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by John Lamparski/WireImage)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 02: Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds attend the premiere of "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" at Military Island in Times Square on May 2, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ferdman/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 02: Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds attend the premiere of "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" at Military Island in Times Square on May 2, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ferdman/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 02: Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively attend the premiere of "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" at Military Island in Times Square on May 2, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ferdman/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 02: Blake Lively attends the premiere of "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" at Military Island in Times Square on May 2, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Steven Ferdman/Getty Images)
Canadian actor Ryan Reynolds and his wife actress Blake Lively attend the premiere of "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" at Military Island - Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Angela Weiss / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 02: Blake Lively attends "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" U.S. Premiere at Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by John Lamparski/WireImage)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 02: Blake Lively attends the "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" U.S. Premiere at Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Sagliocco/FilmMagic)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 02: Blake Lively attends the "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" U.S. Premiere at Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Sagliocco/FilmMagic)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 02: Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively attend the "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" U.S. Premiere at Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Sagliocco/FilmMagic)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 02: Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively attend the "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" U.S. Premiere at Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Sagliocco/FilmMagic)
US actor Ryan Reynolds and his wife actress Blake Lively attend the premiere of "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" at Military Island - Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Angela Weiss / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 02: Blake Lively attends "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" U.S. Premiere at Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by John Lamparski/WireImage)
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - MAY 02: Blake Lively attends "Pokemon Detective Pikachu" U.S. Premiere at Times Square on May 02, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by John Lamparski/WireImage)
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"We’re blown away by the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, and the Young Center’s commitment to not only justice and democracy, but humanity," the couple said in a statement regarding their donation.

"Over the last few years, our perspective has grown and we’ve realized we have to do everything possible to foster more compassion and empathy in this world," their statement continued. "History's being written right now. We’re grateful to give back to organizations who give voice to so many."

This is one additional facet to the couple's extensive history of philanthropy. Reynolds has been a vocal and financial supporter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, F**k Cancer and the Michael J. Fox Foundation, while Lively has given her time, energy and resources to multiple groups, including the celeb-backed charity organization Chime for Change.

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Migrants in Tijuana trickling over and under the border wall
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Migrants in Tijuana trickling over and under the border wall
Honduran migrant Joel Mendez, 22, passes his eight-month-old son Daniel through a hole under the U.S. border wall to his partner, Yesenia Martinez, 24, who had already crossed in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 7, 2018. Moments later Martinez surrendered to waiting border guards while Mendez stayed behind in Tijuana to work, saying he feared he'd be deported if he crossed. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Central American migrants planning to surrender to U.S. border patrol agents climb over the U.S. border wall from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, late Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Thousands of migrants are living in crowded tent cities in the Mexican city of Tijuana after undertaking a grueling, weeks-long journey to the U.S. border. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
In a photo taken from Playas of Tijuana, Mexico, Honduran migrants climb over a section of the U.S. border fence before handing themselves in to border control agents, Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018. A steady trickle of Central American migrants have been finding ways to climb over, tunnel under or slip through the U.S. border wall to plant their feet on U.S. soil and ask for asylum. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Honduran migrants who jumped the border wall to the U.S. side, help other members of their families to jump the wall, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018. Thousands of migrants who traveled via caravan are seeking asylum in the United States, but face a decision between waiting months or crossing illegally, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing in San Diego. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
Honduran migrant Joel Mendez, 22, feeds his eight-month-old son Daniel as his partner Yesenia Martinez, 24, crawls through a hole under the U.S. border wall, in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 7, 2018. Moments later Martinez surrendered to waiting border guards while Mendez stayed behind in Tijuana to work, saying he feared he'd be deported if he crossed. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Yesenia Martinez, 24, carries her eight-month-old son Daniel as she looks for a place to cross the U.S. border wall to surrender to border patrol and request asylum, in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 7, 2018. Martinez surrendered to waiting border guards while her partner Joel Mendez stayed behind in Tijuana to work, saying he feared he'd be deported if he crossed. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A woman climbs the U.S. border wall, planning to surrender to U.S. Border Patrol agents and apply for asylum, as she crosses from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Monday, Dec. 3, 2018. Often within minutes, border guards quickly arrive to escort migrants to detention centers and begin "credible fear" interviews. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A woman holding a baby peers through the U.S. border fence as she tries to reach a point where scores of migrants have been crossing in recent days, now blocked by private security, in Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018. Legal groups argue that federal law states that immigrants can apply for asylum no matter how they enter U.S. territory. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Honduran migrant Leivi Ortega, 22, wearing a rosary, looks at her phone while she, her partner and their young daughter, wait in hopes of finding an opportunity to cross the U.S. border from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2018. In early December, U.S. Customs and Border Protection said that the San Diego sector experienced a "slight uptick" in families entering the U.S. illegally with the goal of seeking asylum. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
Yesenia Martinez, 24, reaches back from the San Diego, California side of the U.S. border wall to get her baby's bottle, after crossing underneath from Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Dec. 7, 2018. Martinez is among a wave of Central Americans getting past the imposing barrier between Mexico and California and expediting their asylum claims by readily handing themselves over to U.S. agents. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A Honduran migrant helps a young girl cross to the American side of the border wall, in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018. In November, President Donald Trump issued a proclamation suspending asylum rights for people who try to cross into the U.S. illegally from Mexico, although a divided U.S. appeals court has refused to immediately allow the Trump administration to enforce the ban. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
Salvadoran migrant Cesar Jobet, right, and Daniel Jeremias Cruz hide from U.S. border agents after they dug a hole in the sand under the border wall and crossed over to the U.S. side, in Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 30, 2018. When the two youths were detected by agents they ran back to the Mexican side. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
A Honduran migrant walks with his son in his arms after jumping the U.S. border wall with plans to turn himself over to U.S. border patrol agents in order to apply for asylum, seen from Tijuana, Mexico, Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. In twos or threes, or sometimes by the dozen, migrants arrive at the U.S. border wall and manage to cross over. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
A Honduran migrant walks with his son in his arms after jumping the wall to the U.S that separates Tijuana, Mexico and San Diego, in Tijuana, Mexico, Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. Aid workers and humanitarian organizations expressed concerns Thursday about the unsanitary conditions at the sports complex in Tijuana where more than 6,000 Central American migrants are packed into a space adequate for half that many people and where lice infestations and respiratory infections are rampant. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
A Honduran migrant walks with his son in his arms after jumping the wall to the U.S that separates Tijuana, Mexico and San Diego, in Tijuana, Mexico, Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. Aid workers and humanitarian organizations expressed concerns Thursday about the unsanitary conditions at the sports complex in Tijuana where more than 6,000 Central American migrants are packed into a space adequate for half that many people and where lice infestations and respiratory infections are rampant. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
A Honduran migrant walks after jumping the wall to the U.S that separates Tijuana, Mexico and San Diego, in Tijuana, Mexico, Thursday, Nov. 29, 2018. Aid workers and humanitarian organizations expressed concerns Thursday about the unsanitary conditions at the sports complex in Tijuana where more than 6,000 Central American migrants are packed into a space adequate for half that many people and where lice infestations and respiratory infections are rampant. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In a photo taken from the Tijuana, Mexico, side of the border wall, a guard on the U.S. side, at left, watches Honduran migrants jump the wall into the United States, Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018. Thousands of migrants who traveled via caravan are seeking asylum in the U.S., but face a decision between waiting months or crossing illegally, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing in San Diego. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In a photo taken from the Tijuana, Mexico, side of the border, two immigrants on U.S. soil try to jump the second wall before border police arrived and arrested them, Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018. Thousands of migrants who traveled via caravan are seeking asylum in the U.S., but face a decision between waiting months or crossing illegally, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing in San Diego. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
In a photo taken from the Tijuana, Mexico, side of the border wall, a U.S. Border Patrol agent is seen as Honduran migrants who jumped the wall surrender on the U.S. side, Sunday, Dec. 2, 2018. Thousands of migrants who traveled via caravan are seeking asylum in the U.S., but face a decision between waiting months or crossing illegally, because the U.S. government only processes a limited number of cases a day at the San Ysidro border crossing in San Diego. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)
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