Lori Loughlin 'strongly believes' she shouldn’t face jail for her alleged role in college scam (Exclusive)

Lori Loughlin believes she “doesn’t deserve” jail time for her alleged role in a nationwide college admissions cheating scam, a source tells ET.

The Fuller House star and her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, are accused of paying $500,000 in bribes to get their daughters, 19-year-old Olivia and 20-year-old Bella, admitted to the University of Southern California, as recruits for the crew team, even though neither of them participated in the sport. They both entered not guilty pleas in April.

“Lori’s situation has gone from bad to worse,” a source close to the actress tells ET. “Jail time has always been a possibility, but since more charges were filed her reality [of not serving time] seems grim. While the fact she could serve time never leaves her mind, she strongly believes she doesn’t deserve to. She truly feels it was all a misunderstanding."

Making matters worse, Olivia is now reluctant to listen to her parents, according to the source.

“Olivia Jade is totally over it and won’t listen to anything her parents say now,” the source says. “She is in no way ready to forgive anything her parents have done. Lori doesn’t understand Olivia’s reaction. She seems to feel her act was selfless and misunderstood and she wants to prove she had all the best intentions and even that she was, in some way, duped into breaking the law.”

The source adds that Loughlin thought Olivia would have forgiven her by now and that the two have attended therapy to help save their relationship.

“Lori felt at this point her daughter would come around and forgive her,” the source says. “They have gone to therapy in hopes things would improve, but it doesn’t seem that that’s happened. Olivia is still not talking to her mother because she’s hurt and feels betrayed.”

“She feels this could have all been avoided had her mother listened to her when she expressed she wasn’t interested in going to college,” the source continues. “The fact she has lost her business deals and can’t go out in public without being photographed and scrutinized is a constant reminder of what her mother has done.”

Meanwhile, the former When Calls the Heart actress’ friends are hoping that she admits some guilt in the case. They continue to stand by her as court proceedings unfold.

“[Lori’s] children and most of her friends aren’t entirely convinced this was some kind of a mistake,” the source explains. “They know she is a loving mother who only wants the best for her kids, but they also know she needs to face that what she did was unlawful and [how it ]has affected not only her children, but also many others. Her friends want her to rethink her plan for the case and admit some sort of guilt. Her closest friends have stuck by her despite her huge mistake.”

Their hopes for Loughlin to own up to her alleged actions come as fellow television star Felicity Huffman formally pleaded guilty for her part in the scam during a court appearance in Boston, Massachusetts, on Monday.

“Felicity worries non-stop because she knows she has made the worst mistake of her life," a source told ET. "Her hope is that after she is able to complete her deal that she will be able to rebuild her family life."

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Lori Loughlin arrives at court
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Lori Loughlin arrives at court
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Lori Loughlin, left, leaves as her husband Mossimo Giannulli, right, trails behind her outside of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Mossimo Giannulli, left, husband of actress Lori Loughlin, follows her out of the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Lori Loughlin, in tan at right, and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, in green tie behind her, leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Lori Loughlin, in tan at right, and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, in green tie behind her, leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Lori Loughlin, center in tan, and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, in green tie behind her, leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Lori Loughlin, in tan at center, leaves as her husband Mossimo Giannulli, in green tie at right, follows behind her outside the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Lori Loughlin, center in tan, and her husband Mossimo Giannulli, in green tie behind her, leave the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin, center, exits federal court in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., on Wednesday, April 3, 2019. Wealthy parents appeared in court as the clock ticks down on plea bargains for their alleged role in the biggest college admissions scam the Justice Department has ever prosecuted. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Actress Lori Loughlin, center, exits federal court in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., on Wednesday, April 3, 2019. Wealthy parents appeared in court as the clock ticks down on plea bargains for their alleged role in the biggest college admissions scam the Justice Department has ever prosecuted. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Actress Lori Loughlin, right, exits federal court in Boston, Massachusetts, U.S., on Wednesday, April 3, 2019. Wealthy parents appeared in court as the clock ticks down on plea bargains for their alleged role in the biggest college admissions scam the Justice Department has ever prosecuted. Photographer: Scott Eisen/Bloomberg via Getty Images
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 03: Lori Loughlin exits the John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse after appearing in Federal Court to answer charges stemming from college admissions scandal on April 3, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin exits the courthouse after facing charges for allegedly conspiring to commit mail fraud and other charges in the college admissions scandal at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin exits the courthouse after facing charges for allegedly conspiring to commit mail fraud and other charges in the college admissions scandal at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin exits the courthouse after facing charges for allegedly conspiring to commit mail fraud and other charges in the college admissions scandal at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin exits the courthouse after facing charges for allegedly conspiring to commit mail fraud and other charges in the college admissions scandal at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Lori Loughlin heads into the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Lori Loughlin, center, arrives at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
Actress Lori Loughlin (C) arrives at the court to appear before Judge M. Page Kelley to face charge for allegedly conspiring to commit mail fraud and other charges in the college admissions scandal at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, Massachusetts on April 3, 2019. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
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