Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez slams Felicity Huffman's lenient prison sentence amid reports actress could face just 0-6 months

Last week it was announced that Felicity Huffman intends to strike a plea deal for her involvement in the college admissions fraud scheme Operation Varsity Blues, in which she’s accused of paying $15,000 to have her daughter Sophia’s SAT scores falsified.

Many are speculating over how much jail time the actress is facing, with federal prosecutors reportedly recommending a sentencing guideline of four to 10 months. Now comes word that the former Desperate Housewives star could face no more than six months.

That’s not good enough for Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. The freshman congresswoman responded to NBC News investigative journalist Tom Winter’s tweet about Huffman potentially getting a sentence of 0-6 months by pointing out the double standards for criminals of “wealth and privilege.”

The New York Democrat accused the justice system — which she called a “class enforcement system” — of treating people of color and low-income citizens more harshly than those, like Huffman, with power and money.

Many agreed with the politician’s comment about Huffman.

Others dismissed her argument, with several claiming that the dropped charges against Jussie Smollett, who is black, proved that getting a slap on the wrist wasn’t about race or white privilege.

And many commenters said that Huffman doesn’t necessarily deserve a long sentence.

Winter, the reporter whose tweet prompted Ocasio-Cortez’s comment, pointed out that — while many may want to see Huffman punished for trying to cheat the system — her participation in the SAT fraud was relatively minor. By comparison, Lori Loughlin and husband Mossimo Giannulli could each face up to 40 years — though five is more likely — in prison because they allegedly spent $500,000 on fraudulently getting their two daughters into college.

Related: Felicity Huffman arrives at court

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Felicity Huffman arrives at court
Actress Felicity Huffman departs federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, after facing charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photos/Charles Krupa)
ADDS IDENTIFICATION OF MAN AS MOORE HUFFMAN JR. - Actress Felicity Huffman arrives holding hands with her brother Moore Huffman Jr., left, at federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, to face charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
ADDS IDENTIFICATION OF MAN AS MOORE HUFFMAN JR. -Actress Felicity Huffman arrives holding hands with her brother Moore Huffman Jr., left, at federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, to face charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
La actriz Felicity Huffman llega a una corte federal en Boston el miércoles 3 de abril del 2019 para enfrentar cargos relacionados con el escándalo de sobornos para obtener ingreso a universidades de prestigio. (AP Foto/Charles Krupa)
La actriz Felicity Huffman llega a una corte federal en Boston el miércoles 3 de abril del 2019 para enfrentar cargos relacionados con el escándalo de sobornos para obtener ingreso a universidades de prestigio. (AP Foto/Charles Krupa)
Actress Felicity Huffman arrives at federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, to face charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
Actress Felicity Huffman departs federal court in Boston with her brother Moore Huffman Jr., left, on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, after facing charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photos/Charles Krupa) (AP Photos/Steven Senne)
Actress Felicity Huffman arrives at federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, to face charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
Actress Felicity Huffman arrives at federal court in Boston on Wednesday, April 3, 2019, to face charges in a nationwide college admissions bribery scandal. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Felicity Huffman, in blue shirt at center, leaves the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Felicity Huffman, in blue shirt at right, leaves the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 3: Actress Felicity Huffman leaves the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. Hollywood stars Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin were among 13 parents scheduled to appear in federal court in Boston Wednesday for the first time since they were charged last month in a massive college admissions cheating scandal. They were among 50 people - including coaches, powerful financiers, and entrepreneurs - charged in a brazen plot in which wealthy parents allegedly schemed to bribe sports coaches at top colleges to admit their children. Many of the parents allegedly paid to have someone else take the SAT or ACT exams for their children or correct their answers, guaranteeing them high scores. (Photo by Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
BOSTON, MA - APRIL 03: Felicity Huffman exits the John Joseph Moakley U.S. Courthouse after appearing in Federal Court to answer charges stemming from college admissions scandal on April 3, 2019 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Paul Marotta/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman enters the court to appear before Judge M. Page Kelley to face charge for allegedly conspiring to commit mail fraud and other charges in the college admissions scandal at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, Massachusetts on April 3, 2019. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman enters the court to appear before Judge M. Page Kelley to face charge for allegedly conspiring to commit mail fraud and other charges in the college admissions scandal at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston, Massachusetts on April 3, 2019. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
Actress Felicity Huffman (C) exits the courthouse after facing charges for allegedly conspiring to commit mail fraud and other charges in the college admissions scandal at the John Joseph Moakley United States Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)
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