Last Night Now Late Night: Laura Ingraham says MAGA hats show what ‘true tolerance, kindness and inclusiveness looks like’

On Thursday’s The Ingraham Angle on Fox News, host Laura Ingraham took issue with how she thinks the media and liberals are treating people who wear hats with the “Make America Great Again” slogan.

“It’s gotten so bad in America that wearing a Trump hat is basically considered a hate crime,” she said. “The goal, my friends, is to brand an entire belief system as immoral, evil, toxic and, of course, it’s racist. Liberals who used to love discourse, I remember them when they used to love to debate. They now prefer the easier route: Just call someone a Nazi or closet KKK member and you’re done.”

She pointed to recent events like the Washington, D.C., rally involving the Covington Catholic High School students, who she said “were guilty of only standing their ground with respect and grace, MAGA hats and all,” and the Bay Area restaurant owner who recently said he will refuse service to anyone wearing a MAGA hat (he later apologized), as examples of intolerance. Which is why she wants people to continue to wear the hats.

“It is irresponsible and frankly unjust to tar all Trump supporters as racist and haters because you disagree with the president, or because some nut bag did something hateful and awful,” she said.

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ELKHART, IN - MAY 10: President Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a campaign rally on May 10, 2018 in Elkhart, Indiana. The crowd filled the 7,500-person-capacity gymnasium. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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Ingraham said that given President Trump’s success in office, there’s no reason the hats should represent anything other than positivity.

“By any objective analysis, Donald Trump’s policies are working. And they’re not scary, and they’re not racist, and they’re not anti-woman, and they’re not anti-immigrant,” Ingraham said. “They’re very pragmatic.”

She encouraged her viewers to not be intimidated or hesitant to put on a red MAGA hat.

“I would continue to wear them whenever and wherever you like,” the host said. “And when doing so, be sure to show everyone around you what true tolerance, kindness and inclusiveness looks like.”

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