Fox News' Laura Ingraham says 2018 could ‘turn out to be the year of the man’

Friday morning on Fox News, conservative commentator and host Laura Ingraham weighed in on the nation’s biggest, most divisive discussion: the Kavanaugh hearings.

After yesterday’s Senate hearings — which featured emotional testimony from both Brett Kavanaugh and his accuser, Christine Blasey Ford — this morning Ingraham doubled down on her support of the judge.

“As someone who’s known Judge Kavanaugh for 28 years, and I spent my own time in the Supreme Court as a law clerk, this was a political exercise in futility for the Democrats,” she said.

While those on the left hope that the Kavanaugh controversy could result in increased political participation from women, Ingraham thinks the backlash may be stronger.

RELATED: On the floor of the Senate Judiciary Committee during the vote on Kavanaugh

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On the floor of the Senate Judiciary Committee during the vote on Kavanaugh
Female members of Congress stand in protest as members of the Senate Judiciary Committee meet to vote on the nomination of judge Brett Kavanaugh to be a U.S. Supreme Court associate justice on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 28, 2018. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Senator Dianne Feinstein (R)(D-CA), flanked by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Senator Chuck Grassley (C), addresses a markup hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 28, 2018, for the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by Brendan SMIALOWSKI / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 28: Members of the House of Representatives, who oppose the nomination of the Supreme Court associate justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh, wait to enter the Senate Judiciary Committee vote in Dirksen Building on his nomination on September 28, 2018. From left are, Reps. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, D-Fla., Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., Suzanne Bonamici, D-Ore., Sheila Jackson Lee, R-Texas, Joyce Beatty, D-Ohio, Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., and Julia Brownley, D-Calif. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Senator Dianne Feinstein (C)(D-CA), addresses a markup hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 28, 2018, for the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by Brendan SMIALOWSKI / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Senator Dianne Feinstein (R)(D-CA), flanked by Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Senator Chuck Grassley (L), prepare for a markup hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 28, 2018, for the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Senate Judiciary Committee ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (L)(D-CA), Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) (C), and Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) speak with aids during a markup hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 28, 2018, for the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Senator Ted Cruz, a Republican from Texas, left, speaks with Senator Lindsey Graham, a Republican from South Carolina, center, as Senator Chuck Grassley, a Republican from Iowa and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, stands during a markup hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 28, 2018. Supreme Court nominee�Brett�Kavanaugh�appears headed toward approval by the Senate Judiciary Committee after pivotal GOP Senator�Jeff Flake�said he'll vote to confirm the nominee. Photographer: Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, a Republican from Texas, left, speaks with Senator Chuck Grassley, a Republican from Iowa and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, center, as Senator Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat from California and ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, talks with a staff memeber during a markup hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 28, 2018. Supreme Court nominee�Brett�Kavanaugh�appears headed toward approval by the Senate Judiciary Committee after pivotal GOP Senator�Jeff Flake�said he'll vote to confirm the nominee. Photographer: Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A US Capitol Police Officer tells a group of female members of Congress that they must sit down or leave as they stand in silent protest against Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court during a US Senate Judiciary Committee markup hearing to consider his nomination, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 28, 2018. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
A group of female members of Congress stand in silent protest against Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court during a US Senate Judiciary Committee markup hearing to consider his nomination, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 28, 2018. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
A group of female members of Congress stand in silent protest against Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court during a US Senate Judiciary Committee markup hearing to consider his nomination, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 28, 2018. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Senator Ted Cruz, a Republican from Texas, from left, Senator Mike Lee, a Republican from Utah, Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, a Republican from Texas, Senator Orrin Hatch, a Republican from Utah, Senator Chuck Grassley, a Republican from Iowa and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Senator Dianne Feinstein, a Democrat from California and ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, attend a markup hearing in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Friday, Sept. 28, 2018. Supreme Court nominee�Brett�Kavanaugh�appears headed toward approval by the Senate Judiciary Committee after pivotal GOP Senator�Jeff Flake�said he'll vote to confirm the nominee. Photographer: Aaron P. Bernstein/Bloomberg via Getty Images
US Senator Kamala Harris (R), Democrat from California, US Senator Mazie Hirono (L), Democrat from Hawaii, and US Senator Richard Blumenthal (C), Democrat from Connecticut, all members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, speak with survivors of sexual assault and supporters as they protest against Judge Brett Kavanaugh's nomination as an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court as the US Senate Judiciary Committee considers his nomination, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 28, 2018. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 28: Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley (R-IA) listens as ranking member Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) speaks during a contentious committee meeting September 28, 2018 in Washington, DC. The committee met to discuss and later vote on the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court prior to the nomination proceeding to a vote in the full U.S. Senate. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
Senate Judiciary Committee members Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) (L) and Christopher Coons (D-DE) look on after a markup hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 28, 2018, on the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by Brendan SMIALOWSKI / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Senate Judiciary Committee chair Chuck Grassley (R-IA) listens to Senator Ben Sasse (R-NE) after a markup hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 28, 2018, on the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. - Kavanaugh's contentious Supreme Court nomination will be put to an initial vote Friday, the day after a dramatic Senate hearing saw the judge furiously fight back against sexual assault allegations recounted in harrowing detail by his accuser. (Photo by Brendan SMIALOWSKI / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
House members stand in protest during the Senate Judiciary Committee meeting to vote on the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States in Washington, U.S., September 28, 2018. REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert
Sen. Kamala Harris's (D-CA) seat is seen vacant after she and fellow democrats walked out of the Senate Judiciary Committee meeting to vote on the nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, in Washington, U.S., September 28, 2018. REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert
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“And I don’t think this whole ‘year of the woman’ thing … I wonder if they haven’t bit off more than they can chew on that,” said Ingraham. “Because I think it could easily as well turn out to be the year of the man.”

She went on to say, “[Men] feel like the target is on their back all the time, and it’s not fair to just make one allegation and say your life should be turned upside down. I don’t think that’s fair to victims, and I don’t think that’s fair to the accused.”

Ingraham’s comment that it might be the “year of the man” makes reference to the Anita Hill hearings of 1991. After Clarence Thomas was confirmed to the Supreme Court, there was a surge of women who successfully ran for office, resulting in 1992 being dubbed the Year of the Woman.

Ingraham also made her “year of the man” comment on Twitter, and that resulted in many users writing back different versions of the argument that every year is the year of the man.

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