Rob Lowe disses himself to criticize new ‘Popular Film’ Oscars category

Say what you will about Rob Lowe, but the “Parks & Recreation” star knows what he’s talking about when it comes to almost universally-acknowledged bad ideas. And he isn’t afraid to be his own collateral damage to criticize one.

For instance, on Wednesday, when he weighed in on the Film Academy’s announcement of a new Oscars category, “outstanding achievement in popular film.” Lowe told his followers on Twitter that he thinks it ranks among the worst-ever Academy decisions — and he would know:

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Lowe is referring to the infamous opening of the 1989 Oscars, in which Snow White (played by actress Eileen Bowman) led a changing roster of actors through a medley of showtunes and reworked pop songs. Continuing for an excruciating 11 minutes, the low(e) point comes five minutes in when Rob is brought out as Snow White’s “blind date,” kicking off what is now regarded as possibly the worst moment in Academy Awards history.

It honestly beggars belief, and lest you think we’re exaggerating, watch below and see for yourself:

We have no idea if the new Oscars category will turn out to be bad on that level. But it’s undeniable that reaction to the idea has been pretty uniformly negative. Many argue it cheapens the prestige of the Oscars. Others think it will prevent blockbusters that arguably deserve Best Picture nominations — “Black Panther” is a frequent example — from being properly recognized. Still others point out that it will apparently come at the expense of below-the-line awards that will now be handed out during commercial breaks instead of live.

For its part, the Academy hopes that by featuring huge box office earners during the ceremony, the recent ratings-decline can be reversed. It remains to be seen if that will be the case — or if the negative reaction will lead to a reversal of course. Until whatever will happen happens, we have a lot of questions of our own — read more about that here.

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