Seth Rogen blasts Twitter CEO for verifying white supremacists

Seth Rogen says he’s been directly in touch with Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey about verifying “white supremacists” on the social platform — and the actor-comedian now is ripping into the tech exec.

Rogen, in a tweet Tuesday, wrote: “I’ve been DMing with @jack about his bizarre need to verify white supremacists on his platform for the last 8 months or so, and after all the exchanges, I’ve reached a conclusion: the dude simply does not seem to give a f-ck.”

Twitter reps did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Dorsey had not responded to Rogen’s tweet as of press time.

Hate speech has been one of the issues threatening Twitter’s growth, and Dorsey has routinely pledged to make “safety” a No. 1 priority at Twitter and to measure the “health” of conversations on the platform.

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A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he marches during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of a white supremacy group gives the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES) REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group shouts during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of a white supremacy group stands behind a flag with a swastika during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A member of the Ku Klux Klan who says his name is Gary Munker poses for a photo during an interview with AFP in Hampton Bays, New York on November 22, 2016. Munker says his local branch of the KKK, which has recently placed recruitment flyers on car windshields on Long Island, has seen around 1,000 enquiries from people interested in joining since the election of Donald Trump. / AFP / William EDWARDS (Photo credit should read WILLIAM EDWARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of a white supremacy group give the fascist salute during a gathering in West Allis, Wisconsin, September 3, 2011. Neo-Nazi demonstrators gathered for a "rally in defense of white America" in response to an incident that Milwaukee Police Chief described as racially charged violence outside the Wisconsin state fair on August 4, 2011. REUTERS/Darren Hauck (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)
A supporter of the Ku Klux Klan is seen with his tattoos during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan gestures as he listens to the crowd while carrying a Confederate flag during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. REUTERS/Chris Keane
A member of the Ku Klux Klan yells during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week.REUTERS/Chris Keane
Members of the Ku Klux Klan yell as they fly Confederate flags during a rally at the statehouse in Columbia, South Carolina July 18, 2015. A Ku Klux Klan chapter and an African-American group planned overlapping demonstrations on Saturday outside the South Carolina State House, where state officials removed the Confederate battle flag last week. REUTERS/Chris Keane? TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
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Last December, Twitter banned a number of accounts associated with far-right extremists, including at least one that has been retweeted by President Trump, as part of instituting new rules against hate and harassment.

Some of the accounts banned in late 2017 included the Traditionalist Worker Party, a group of white supremacists known for its anti-semitism, the pro-confederate League of the South, as well as the American Nazi Party. Twitter also banned accounts from individuals associated with these groups, as well as far-right extremists from the U.K., including the anti-immigrant group Britain First.

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