3LAU, PSG & SingularDTV Launch First Blockchain-Powered Festival, OUR Music Festival

Music festivals around the world are diversifying talent and expanding production, but none have aimed to establish an ecosystem that embraces the consumer like OUR Music Festival (OMF), a first-of-its-kind, blockchain-powered festival network.

Electronic music DJ/producer Justin Blau (3LAU), blockchain entertainment studio SingularDTV and independent festival promoter Prime Social Group have partnered to launch the pioneering endeavor, whose inaugural event will take place Oct. 20 at San Francisco's Civic Center Plaza.

OMF's first edition will feature dance superstar Zedd, whose hit song, "The Middle" with Maren Morris and Grey, currently sits at No. 8 on the Billboard Hot 100. OMF plans to announce additional hip-hop and dance artists in the coming weeks. Following the event, the OMF Token will be available publicly, and additional global partnerships with artists and festivals will be announced.

The OMF team includes digital marketing firm CrowdWaves, as well as AM Only founder and Paradigm partner Paul Morris, Paradigm agents Lee Anderson and Sam Hunt, and CAA agents Hunter Williams and Phil Quist, who will be joining as strategic advisors.

OMF's partners have identified potential solutions to numerous issues that plague music festivals, including ticket scalping, counterfeiting and a lack of consumer control. Moreover, they envision future editions of OMF further harnessing the power of Ethereum and smart contract technology to empower fans. For example, attendees could earn OMF tokens by simply participating in the festival experience, which they can then redeem for tickets, VIP upgrades, merchandise, food, beverages and more at OMF festivals and partnered events.

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Workers prepare a new installation of miners, at the cryptocurrency farming operation, Bitfarms, in Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec, Canada, February 2, 2018. Picture taken February 2, 2018. REUTERS/Christinne Muschi
PARIS, FRANCE - FEBRUARY 16: In this photo illustration, a visual representation of digital cryptocurrencies, Bitcoin, Ripple, Ethernum, Dash, Monero and Litecoin is displayed on February 16, 2018 in Paris, France. Digital cryptocurrencies have seen unprecedented growth in 2017, despite remaining extremely volatile. (Photo Illustration by Chesnot/Getty Images)
A worker checks the fans on miners, at the cryptocurrency farming operation, Bitfarms, in Farnham, Quebec, Canada, February 2, 2018. Picture taken February 2, 2018. REUTERS/Christinne Muschi
Representation of the Ripple virtual currency is seen in this illustration picture, February 13, 2018. Picture is taken February 13. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration
A customer of an Australian bank withdraws money from an Automatic Teller Machine (ATM) next to a Bitcoin ATM at a shopping mall in central Sydney, Australia, October 1, 2015. Australian businesses are turning their backs on bitcoin, as signs grow that the cryptocurrency's mainstream appeal is fading. Concerns about bitcoin's potential crime links mean many businesses have stopped accepting it, a trend accelerated by Australian banks' move last month to close the accounts of 13 of the country's 17 bitcoin exchanges.Picture taken October 1, 2015. REUTERS/David Gray
A worker checks the fan on a miner, at the cryptocurrency farming operation, Bitfarms, in Farnham, Quebec, Canada, February 2, 2018. Picture taken February 2, 2018. REUTERS/Christinne Muschi
A man walks past an electric board showing exchange rates of various cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin (top L) at a cryptocurrencies exchange in Seoul, South Korea December 13, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A monitor shows various cryptocurrencies' exchange rates against Japanese Yen including NEM coin (middle in the top) at 'nem bar', where customers can pay with NEM coins, in Tokyo, Japan January 29, 2018. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
A miner waits to have its fan replaced, at the cryptocurrency farming operation, Bitfarms, in Farnham, Quebec, Canada, February 2, 2018. Picture taken February 2, 2018. REUTERS/Christinne Muschi
PARIS, FRANCE - FEBRUARY 16: In this photo illustration, the icon of the the Coincheck cryptocurrency exchange application is seen on the screen of an iPhone on February 16, 2018 in Paris, France. Victims of one of the world's largest cryptocurrency hacks are suing Coincheck, the Japanese company whose network was breached in a theft worth more than dollars 650 millions. Coincheck is a bitcoin wallet and exchange service headquartered in Tokyo, Japan, founded by Koichiro Wada and Yusuke Otsuka. It operates exchanges between bitcoin/ether and fiat currencies in Japan, and bitcoin transactions and storage in some countries worldwide. (Photo Illustration by Chesnot/Getty Images)
Representation of the Ripple virtual currency is seen in this illustration picture, February 13, 2018. Picture is taken February 13. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration
A view of Romania's first bitcoin ATM is seen in downtown Bucharest June 27, 2014. In a well-lit office with red window frames in downtown Bucharest, Romania's first bitcoin ATM attracts many who until it opened in May had to buy or sell the digital currency face-to-face or through wire transfers. The interest in bitcoin in Romania stands out in a region where national currencies are widely seen as poor substitutes for the euro. Tech-savvy and still deeply distrustful of officialdom 25 years after the end of communism, many Romanians are unfazed by warnings about the cryptocurrency. Picture taken June 27, 2014. To match Feature ROMANIA-BITCOIN/ REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
Representations of the Ripple, Bitcoin, Etherum and Litecoin virtual currencies are seen on a PC motherboard in this illustration picture, February 13, 2018. Picture is taken February 13, 2018. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration
Eoh Kyung-hoon, leader of a club studying cryptocurrencies, checks a chart after a meeting at a university in Seoul, South Korea, December 20, 2017. Picture taken December 20, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
Eoh Kyung-hoon, leader of a club studying cryptocurrencies, attends a meeting at a university in Seoul, South Korea, December 20, 2017. Picture taken December 20, 2017. REUTERS/Kim Hong-Ji
A Bitcoin (virtual currency) paper wallet with QR codes and a coin are seen in an illustration picture taken at La Maison du Bitcoin in Paris, France, May 27, 2015. British authorities have come out in support of digital currencies in the name of promoting financial innovation, while proposing that regulations should be drawn up to prevent their use in crime. But it is technophiles who are leading the drive to make London a real-world hub for trade in web-based "cryptocurrencies", of which bitcoin is the original and still most popular. Picture taken May 27, 2015. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier
Publican Grant Fairweather places a beer on the bar next to a Bitcoin sign as he serves a customer in Sydney, Australia, September 29, 2015. Australian businesses are turning their backs on bitcoin, as signs grow that the cryptocurrency's mainstream appeal is fading. Concerns about bitcoin's potential crime links mean many businesses have stopped accepting it, a trend accelerated by Australian banks' move last month to close the accounts of 13 of the country's 17 bitcoin exchanges. Picture taken September 29, 2015. REUTERS/David Gray
A Bitcoin (virtual currency) hardware wallet and a coin are seen in an illustration picture taken at La Maison du Bitcoin in Paris, France, May 27, 2015. British authorities have come out in support of digital currencies in the name of promoting financial innovation, while proposing that regulations should be drawn up to prevent their use in crime. But it is technophiles who are leading the drive to make London a real-world hub for trade in web-based "cryptocurrencies", of which bitcoin is the original and still most popular. Picture taken May 27, 2015. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier
George Rotariu uses Romania's first bitcoin ATM in downtown Bucharest June 27, 2014. In a well-lit office with red window frames in downtown Bucharest, Romania's first bitcoin ATM attracts many who until it opened in May had to buy or sell the digital currency face-to-face or through wire transfers. The interest in bitcoin in Romania stands out in a region where national currencies are widely seen as poor substitutes for the euro. Tech-savvy and still deeply distrustful of officialdom 25 years after the end of communism, many Romanians are unfazed by warnings about the cryptocurrency. Picture taken June 27, 2014. To match Feature ROMANIA-BITCOIN/ REUTERS/Bogdan Cristel (ROMANIA - Tags: BUSINESS SOCIETY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
PARIS, FRANCE - FEBRUARY 16: In this photo illustration, a visual representation of the digital Cryptocurrency Monero is displayed on February 16, 2018 in Paris, France. Monero is an electronic currency that has experienced an incredible surge in 2017. Monero is one of the first 15 cryptocurrencies on the market. The success of Monero is explained by its popularity in 2016 with users of the site AlphaBay, an illegal darknet platform on which were selling drugs and weapons. Cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, Dash, Monero and Litetcoin have seen unprecedented growth in 2017, despite remaining extremely volatile. (Photo Illustration by Chesnot/Getty Images)
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"The blockchain space is littered with promises that lack real world application," says Blau, OMF's CEO. "We’re throwing our first event this year to show our commitment to inciting change. While it will take time for OMF to reach its full potential, our team has studied blockchain-layered applications and legal compliance for years to facilitate realistic steps toward decentralization."

The team is currently developing technology that will enable fans who are token holders to influence everything from festival lineup to location in the future.

“It takes vision and grit to bring something as special as OMF to fruition," says SingularDTV CEO Zach LeBeau. "With so many projects focused solely on their ICOs, being able to have a music festival this year itself is a huge step for all of us. OMF is here and now ― it will only get better in the future with increased features and functionality.”

Prime Social Group's co-CEO and founder Adam Lynn adds, "With over 900 concerts and 50+ festivals produced in our career at PSG we've learned all the positives of this amazing industry. We've also found some room for improvements and with the team of incredible partners and technology experts we are going to break down some barriers that we never would've thought had been possible. OMF will revolutionize the live events business in a major way and I am ecstatic to be part of the team leading the charge."

Check out the OMF website and announce video below:

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