Kanye West's 'hero' is Emma Gonzalez — and hers is James Shaw Jr.

Kanye West's admiration for gun control activist Emma Gonzalez isn't mutual.

Just days after West declared himself fully aboard the Donald Trump train, the rapper took to Twitter to praise Gonzalez as his "hero."

"My hero Emma Gonzalez," he wrote Saturday night, before sharing a photo of his freshly-shaved head that he wrote was "inspired by Emma."

Gonzalez, 18, quickly responded with a tweet of her own that mimicked the wording of West's note, but expressed admiration for James Shaw Jr., the man who helped end the Tennessee Waffle House shooting.

"My hero James Shaw Jr.," she wrote alongside a photo of Shaw and his young daughter.

See more of Gonzalez: 

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Parkland shooting survivor Emma Gonzalez
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Parkland shooting survivor Emma Gonzalez
Emma Gonzalez, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, sits for a portrait after calling for more gun control at a rally three days after the shooting at her school, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S. February 17, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez speaks at a rally for gun control at the Broward County Federal Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on February 17, 2018. A former student, Nikolas Cruz, opened fire at the high school leaving 17 people dead and 15 injured on February 14. / AFP PHOTO / RHONA WISE (Photo credit should read RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images)
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez wipes away tears during a CNN town hall meeting, at the BB&T Center, in Sunrise, Florida, U.S. February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Michael Laughlin/Pool
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL - FEBRUARY 17: Emma Gonzalez hugs her father Jose Gonzalez as they join other people after a school shooting that killed 17 to protest against guns on the steps of the Broward County Federal courthouse on February 17, 2018 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Earlier this week former student Nikolas Cruz opened fire with a AR-15 rifle at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School killing 17 people. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Emma Gonzalez, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, gathers with people at North Community Park in Parkland, Fla. for a protest on Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018. Gonzalez is one of many survivors of a mass shooting that took place at the school on Feb. 14, that left 17 people dead. (John McCall/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez reacts during her speech at a rally for gun control at the Broward County Federal Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on February 17, 2018. A student survivor of the Parkland school shooting called out US President Donald Trump on Saturday over his ties to the powerful National Rifle Association, in a poignant address to an anti-gun rally in Florida. 'To every politician taking donations from the NRA, shame on you!' said Emma Gonzalez, assailing Trump over the multi-million-dollar support his campaign received from the gun lobby -- and prompting the crowd to chant in turn: 'Shame on you!' / AFP PHOTO / RHONA WISE (Photo credit should read RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images)
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez is hugged by a friend following her speech at a rally for gun control at the Broward County Federal Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on February 17, 2018. A former student, Nikolas Cruz, opened fire at the high school leaving 17 people dead and 15 injured on February 14. / AFP PHOTO / RHONA WISE (Photo credit should read RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images)
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez comforts a classmate during a CNN town hall meeting, at the BB&T Center, in Sunrise, Florida, U.S. February 21, 2018. REUTERS/Michael Laughlin/Pool
Emma Gonzalez, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, speaks to the media after calling for more gun control at a rally three days after the shooting at her school, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, U.S. February 17, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez speaks at a rally for gun control at the Broward County Federal Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on February 17, 2018. Seventeen perished and more than a dozen were wounded in the hail of bullets at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland,Florida the latest mass shooting to devastate a small US community and renew calls for gun control. / AFP PHOTO / RHONA WISE (Photo credit should read RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images)
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez is hugged by a friend following her speech at a rally for gun control at the Broward County Federal Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on February 17, 2018. A former student, Nikolas Cruz, opened fire at the high school leaving 17 people dead and 15 injured on February 14. / AFP PHOTO / RHONA WISE (Photo credit should read RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images)
PARKLAND, FL - FEBRUARY 25: Emma Gonzalez (L), a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and others walk to campus on February 25, 2018 in Parkland, Florida. Today, students and parents were allowed on campus for the first time since the shooting that killed 17 people on February 14. Police arrested 19-year-old former student Nikolas Cruz for the 17 murders. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School student Emma Gonzalez speaks at a rally for gun control at the Broward County Federal Courthouse in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on February 17, 2018. A former student, Nikolas Cruz, opened fire at the high school leaving 17 people dead and 15 injured on February 14. / AFP PHOTO / RHONA WISE (Photo credit should read RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images)
Emma Gonzalez, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, gathers with people at North Community Park in Parkland, Fla. for a protest on Sunday, Feb. 18, 2018. Gonzalez is one of many survivors of a mass shooting that took place at the school on Feb. 14, that left 17 people dead. (John McCall/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
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An unarmed Shaw took down the naked gunman who opened fire at the fast food restaurant April 22. Shaw's bravery, in which he charged at the assailant during a pause in gunfire and knocked the weapon out of his hand, likely saved patrons and prevented a death toll higher than four.

"I figured if I was going to die, he was going to have to work for it," Shaw said of the moment he decided to act. "I don't want people to think that I was the Terminator or Superman or anybody like that… So much life was lost for no reason. I feel like it could be very selfish of me if I didn't point it out. And I apologize."

Shaw has since helped raise more than $192,000 for the victims' families thanks to a GoFundMe he launched last week.

Related: Look back at the Waffle House shooting stopped by Shaw: 

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Waffle House shooting in Nashville, Tennessee
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Waffle House shooting in Nashville, Tennessee
NASHVILLE, TN - APRIL 22: Law enforcement stand outside a Waffle House where four people were killed and two were wounded after a gunman opened fire with an assault weapon on April 22, 2018 in Nashville, Tennessee. Travis Reinking, 29, of Morton, IL, is person of interest in the shooting and is suspected to have left the scene naked. (Photo by Jason Davis/Getty Images)
Suspected shooter Travis Reinking, 29, of Morton, Illinois
A police vehicle sits parked at the scene of a fatal shooting at a Waffle House restaurant near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S., April 22, 2018. Metro Nashville Police Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
Metro Davidson County Police inspect the scene of a fatal shooting at a Waffle House restaurant near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S., April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Metro Davidson County Police inspect the scene of a fatal shooting at a Waffle House restaurant near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S., April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
The truck of Travis Reinking, the suspected shooter, is loaded on a trailer ready to be towed from the scene of a fatal shooting at a Waffle House restaurant near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County Police inspect the truck of Travis Reinking, the suspected shooter, at the scene of a fatal shooting at a Waffle House restaurant near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County police search the apartment complex where Waffle House shooting suspect, Travis Reinking, reportedly lives near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County police and ATF agents search the apartment complex where Waffle House shooting suspect, Travis Reinking, reportedly lives near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S., April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County police search the apartment complex where Waffle House shooting suspect, Travis Reinking, reportedly lives near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County police search the apartment complex where Waffle House shooting suspect, Travis Reinking, reportedly lives near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County police search the apartment complex where Waffle House shooting suspect, Travis Reinking, reportedly lives near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County police search the apartment complex where Waffle House shooting suspect, Travis Reinking, reportedly lives near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County police search the apartment complex where Waffle House shooting suspect, Travis Reinking, reportedly lives near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S. April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County Police escort a man to his car at the scene of a fatal shooting at a Waffle House restaurant near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S., April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County Police inspect the scene of a fatal shooting at a Waffle House restaurant near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S., April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
Metro Davidson County Police inspect the scene of a fatal shooting at a Waffle House restaurant near Nashville, Tennessee, U.S., April 22, 2018. REUTERS/Harrison McClary
NASHVILLE, TN - APRIL 22: Law enforcement investigate the scene outside a Waffle House where four people were killed and two were wounded after a gunman opened fire with an assault weapon on April 22, 2018 in Nashville, Tennessee. Travis Reinking, 29, of Morton, IL, is person of interest in the shooting and is suspected to have left the scene naked. (Photo by Jason Davis/Getty Images)
NASHVILLE, TN - APRIL 22: Law enforcement investigate the scene outside a Waffle House where four people were killed and two were wounded after a gunman opened fire with an assault weapon on April 22, 2018 in Nashville, Tennessee. Travis Reinking, 29, of Morton, IL, is person of interest in the shooting and is suspected to have left the scene naked. (Photo by Jason Davis/Getty Images)
NASHVILLE, TN - APRIL 22: Law enforcement stand outside a Waffle House where four people were killed and two were wounded after a gunman opened fire with an assault weapon on April 22, 2018 in Nashville, Tennessee. Travis Reinking, 29, of Morton, IL, is person of interest in the shooting and is suspected to have left the scene naked. (Photo by Jason Davis/Getty Images)
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The fact that Gonzalez idolizes Shaw is no surprise; the Florida teen has been the face of gun control advocacy since the Feb. 14 shooting at her Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, which claimed the lives of 17 students and teachers.

Gonzalez and her fellow classmates organized the March for Our Lives Rally in Washington, D.C. March 24 — which was attended by West and wife Kim Kardashian.

Still, the rapper's praise of Gonzalez comes as a surprise end to a week filled with tweets and song lyrics declaring loyalty to President Trump.

West previously wrote that he loved his "brother" Trump, and proudly rocked a signed Make America Great Again hat in multiple photos.

He defended his political stance in the lyrics of a new track, "Ye vs. The People," which was released Friday.

"Make America Great Again had a negative reception. I took it, wore it, rocked it gave it a new direction," he rapped. "Added empathy, care and love and affection, and y'all simply questionin' my methonds."

Meanwhile, West's friend John Legend — whose private texts urging the rapper to reconsider his political stance were made public by West — chimed in on his love for Gonzalez, and noted that his newfound right-wing fans may soon be in for a rude awakening.

"Maga's gonna be really disappointed if Kanye ever finds out about their policy positions," Legend wrote, referring to Gonzalez's fight for gun control.

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