From the Woody Allen archives: Auteur was to play porn director longing for young woman

Nearly six decades worth of creative materials, notes and scripts by Woody Allen have been examined and the findings are, well, not good.

In an eye-opening essay for The Washington Post, freelance writer Richard Morgan discussed his exploration of 57 years worth of notes from the film auteur’s personal archives at Princeton University and said it “drips with repetitious misogyny” as a whole.

Most prominent among these notes was a script for an unproduced project called “The Filmmaker,” which followed a documentarian who moonlights as a porn director and who falls in love with a younger woman and destroys his relationship with another woman to chase after the new target of his affection. Morgan notes that the character is so similar to the director who wrote him that he describes the documentarian as “Fake Woody.”

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HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 08: Director Woody Allen speaks onstage during American Film Institute's 45th Life Achievement Award Gala Tribute to Diane Keaton at Dolby Theatre on June 8, 2017 in Hollywood, California. 26658_002 (Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Turner)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 08: Honoree Diane Keaton (L) and Director-Actor Woody Allen onstage at American Film Institute's 45th Life Achievement Award Gala Tribute to Diane Keaton at Dolby Theatre on June 8, 2017 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for AFI)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 08: (L-R) Director Woody Allen and honoree Diane Keaton speak onstage during American Film Institute's 45th Life Achievement Award Gala Tribute to Diane Keaton at Dolby Theatre on June 8, 2017 in Hollywood, California. 26658_002 (Photo by Christopher Polk/Getty Images for Turner)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 08: Director-Actor Woody Allen (L) and Honoree Diane Keaton onstage at American Film Institute's 45th Life Achievement Award Gala Tribute to Diane Keaton at Dolby Theatre on June 8, 2017 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for AFI)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 08: Director-actor Woody Allen speaks onstage during American Film Institute's 45th Life Achievement Award Gala Tribute to Diane Keaton at Dolby Theatre on June 8, 2017 in Hollywood, California. 26658_001 (Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Turner)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - JUNE 08: Director-Actor Woody Allen onstage at American Film Institute's 45th Life Achievement Award Gala Tribute to Diane Keaton at Dolby Theatre on June 8, 2017 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for AFI)
NEW YORK - APRIL 22: Woody Allen and Soon-Yi attend the premier of "Whatever Works" at the Tribeca Film Festival on April 22, 2009 in New York.
WESTWOOD, CA - DECEMBER 23: Woody Allen and his New Orleans Jazz Band perform at Royce Hall, UCLA on December 23, 2013 in Westwood, California. (Photo by Gabriel Olsen/FilmMagic)
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 24: Woody Allen and Soon Yi Previn attend HUGO BOSS celebrates Columbus Circle BOSS flagship opening featuring premiere of "Anthropocene," by Marco Brambilla on September 24, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images for Hugo Boss)
Woody Allen and Diane Keaton in Annie Hall,1977.
STARDUST MEMORIES - 1980 UA film with Woody Allen and Charlotte Rampling
SCENES FROM A MALL (1991) WOODY ALLEN, BETTE MIDLER SFM 012
BANANAS - 1971 UA film with Woody Allen
Woody Allen, Hannah and Her Sisters, 1986
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Morgan said that Allen’s penchant for writing stories about older men falling in love with young women and in which the older man reads as an author surrogate can be seen throughout the Princeton archive. Morgan also wrote that the story template was the basis for the 1979 film “Manhattan,” in which Allen plays a middle-aged comedy writer who is dating a teenager, played by Mariel Hemingway. The scene in which the two kiss was the first kiss Hemingway gave to anyone, and the actress later said in an interview that after the scene she pleaded not to do it again.

“There’s nothing criminal about an 82-year-old’s fixation with 18-year-olds, and it’s not whip-out-your-penis, button-under-the-desk bad. But it’s deeply, anachronistically gross,” concluded Morgan. “More than that, he seems not to care about bettering or changing himself in any way. He lives and thinks and creates as he did in the 1970s, nearly a half-century ago. He’s a reminder that our future, however woke it becomes, will not be full of social-justice valedictorians quoting James Baldwin and Roxane Gay.”

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