George Clooney, Oprah, Beyonce, Julia Roberts to headline Hurricane Harvey relief TV telethon

George Clooney, Oprah, Beyonce and dozens of their closest friends have signed on to Scooter Braun and rapper Bun B’s TV telethon to raise relief money for Hurricane Harvey victims.

Here is the full press release, more to come:

Houston native rapper Bun B has teamed up with SB Projects founder Scooter Braun to present Hand in Hand: A Benefit for Hurricane Harvey Relief telethon to aid those affected by Hurricane Harvey. The one-hour special will be based in Los Angeles with stages in New York, Nashville and a special performance by Country Music icon and Texas native George Strait from his San Antonio benefit concert. Hand in Hand will air live on ABC, CBS, CMT, FOX and NBC on Tuesday, September 12, 8:00-9:00pmEST on the East Coast and replay 8:00-9:00pmPST on the West Coast. The show will also be available internationally via live stream on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter starting at 8:00pmEST during the first broadcast.

Hand in Hand will bring the country together to raise funds, spirits and help rebuild Texas in the wake of this unprecedented devastation. Proceeds from the telethon will benefit United Way of Greater Houston, Habitat for Humanity, Save the Children, Direct Relief, Feeding Texas and The Mayor’s Fund for Hurricane Harvey Relief (administered by the Greater Houston Community Fund) through the Hand in Hand Hurricane Relief Fund managed by Comic Relief USA.

The broadcast will feature appearances, performances, taped tributes and messages from some of the nation’s biggest stars including George Clooney, Jamie Foxx, Karlie Kloss, Beyoncé, Matt Lauer, Rob Lowe, Matthew McConaughey, Norah O’Donnell, Dennis Quaid, Julia Roberts, Kelly Rowland, Adam Sandler, Ryan Seacrest, Michael Strahan, Blake Shelton, Strait, Barbra Streisand, Oprah Winfrey and Reese Witherspoon with more to be announced. Strait, a Country Music Hall of Fame member who is leading the country music world in these efforts, will perform directly from his benefit concert at San Antonio’s Majestic Theatre.

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Celebrities' big donations to Hurricane Harvey relief
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Celebrities' big donations to Hurricane Harvey relief
Sandra Bullock made a $1 million personal donation to the Red Cross: “There are no politics in eight feet of water,” she said. “There are human beings in eight feet of water.”
Drake gave $200,000 in response to Kevin Hart's public call for celebrity donations.
Of his $1 million donation, Tyler Perry delegated $250,000 to Joel Osteen's Lakewood Church.
Leonardo DiCaprio donated $1 million to the United Way Harvey Recovery Fund. In the past, he has made hefty donations to victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, the 2010 Haiti earthquake, and Hurricane Sandy in 2012.
Ellen DeGeneres teamed up with Walmart to announce a $1 million contribution to a relief fund established by JJ Watt, boosting him closer to his goal of $10 million in donations.
Miley Cyrus began crying on "The Ellen Show" after Ellen DeGeneres announced Miley would donate $500,000: "My grandma's sitting here, and my mom's sitting here, and I go home to my seven dogs, and if I didn't have that anymore, it'd just be really hard," she said through tears.
The Kardashian/Jenner women -- Kim, Kourtney, Khloe, Kris, Kylie and Kendall -- announced a joint $500,000 personal donation to hurricane victims.
The first major celebrity to make a public donation, Kevin Hart successfully rallied other celebrities to join his fundraising efforts. He pledged $50,000.
Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson was one of the first celebrities to donate to relief causes, offering up $50,000 in response to Kevin Hart's campaign.
DJ Khaled dropped $25,000 and offered his prayers to the people of Houston.
Nicki Minaj re-posted Kevin Hart's public video plea on Instagram and announced she'd donate $25,000 to the cause. 
Alex Rodriguez and Jennifer Lopez each donated $25,000 and urged their followers to consider contributing to the Red Cross as well.
Green Day gifted a $100,000 donation to Hurricane Harvey relief.
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Phone lines, text messaging, and digital donations will be open at the beginning of the show and will conclude one-hour after the show ends. For more information, updates and a link to donate, please visit www.HandInHand2017.com.

The Hand in Hand broadcast will be produced by SB Projects and Den of Thieves with Scooter Braun, Bernard ‘Bun B’ Freeman, Allison Kaye, Jesse Ignjatovic and Evan Prager serving as Executive Producers.  Additional Executive Producers are Chris Choun, and Lee Lodge with Jordan Brown, Penni Thow and Barb Bialkowski serving as Co-Executive Producers.

20 PHOTOS
Texans being evacuated during Hurricane Harvey
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Texans being evacuated during Hurricane Harvey
People evacuate by dump truck from the Hurricane Harvey floodwaters in Dickinson, Texas August 28, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Volunteers unload evacuee Taylor Mitchell from a rescue vehicle at the George R. Brown Convention Center after Hurricane Harvey inundated the Texas Gulf coast with rain causing widespread flooding, in Houston, Texas, U.S. August 28, 2017. Picture taken August 28, 2017. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
Men look for people wanting to be evacuated from the Hurricane Harvey floodwaters in Dickinson, Texas August 28, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Evacuee Pete Quintana Jr. is wrapped in a blanket at the George R. Brown Convention Center after Hurricane Harvey inundated the Texas Gulf coast with rain causing widespread flooding, in Houston, Texas, U.S. August 28, 2017. Picture taken August 28, 2017. REUTERS/Nick Oxford
A man carries a child after being evacuated by dump truck from the Hurricane Harvey floodwaters in Dickinson, Texas August 28, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
People are evacuated by a high water truck from the Hurricane Harvey floodwaters in Dickinson, Texas, U.S. August 28, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
People are evacuated from flood waters from Hurricane Harvey in a collector's vintage military truck belonging to a volunteer in Dickinson, Texas August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Evacuees are airlifted in a U.S. Coast Guard helicopter after flooding due to Hurricane Harvey inundated neighborhoods in Houston, Texas, August 27, 2017. Picture taken August 27, 2017. U.S. Coast Guard/Petty Officer 3rd Class Johanna Strickland/Handout via REUTERS. ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
People are rescued from flood waters from Hurricane Harvey in an armored police mine-resistant ambush protected (MRAP) vehicle in Dickinson, Texas August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sterling Broughton is moved from a rescue boat onto a kayak after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey rose in Dickenson, Texas August 27, 2017. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Texas National Guard soldiers aid residents in heavily flooded areas from the storms of Hurricane Harvey in Houston, Texas, U.S., August 27, 2017 Lt. Zachary West, 100th MPAD/Texas Military Department/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: Barb Davis, 74. is helped to dry land after being rescued from her flooded neighborhood after it was inundated with rain water, remnants of Hurricane Harvey, on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in areas of Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: People are rescued from a flooded neighborhood after it was inundated with rain water, remnants of Hurricane Harvey, on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in areas of Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: People are rescued from a flooded neighborhood after it was inundated with rain water, remnants of Hurricane Harvey, on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in areas of Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: People are rescued from a flooded neighborhood after it was inundated with rain water, remnants of Hurricane Harvey, on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in areas of Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
A boy and girl hug their grandmothers' dogs after being rescued from rising floodwaters due to Hurricane Harvey in Spring, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. A deluge of rain and rising floodwaters left�Houston�immersed and helpless,�crippling a global center of the oil industry and testing the economic resiliency of a state that's home to almost 1 in 12 U.S. workers. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Rescuers help a woman from a flooded retirement home into a boat after Hurricane Harvey in Spring, Texas, U.S., on Monday, Aug. 28, 2017. A deluge of rain and rising floodwaters left�Houston�immersed and helpless,�crippling a global center of the oil industry and testing the economic resiliency of a state that's home to almost 1 in 12 U.S. workers. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: People wait for a ride to a shelter after being rescued from a flooded neighborhood when it was inundated with rain water, remnants of Hurricane Harvey, on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in areas of Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - AUGUST 28: Dean Mize holds children as he and Jason Legnon use an airboat to rescue people from homes that are inundated with flooding from Hurricane Harvey on August 28, 2017 in Houston, Texas. Harvey, which made landfall north of Corpus Christi late Friday evening, is expected to dump upwards to 40 inches of rain in Texas over the next couple of days. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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