'No stained garment, no smoking gun, nothing,': Cosby juror explains why he wasn't convinced by the plaintiff

One of the jurors in Bill Cosby's trial said that he did not find the accusation of rape convincing because the accuser had worn a bare midriff and had no "stained garment" to show.

Last December, famed comedian Bill Cosby was charged with three counts of aggravated indecent assault in relation to allegations that he drugged and molested Canadian basketball player Andrea Constand in 2004.

On June 17, the judge in Cosby's case declared a mistrial after the 12-person jury spent six days and more than 50 hours trying to decide whether Cosby was guilty or innocent of sexual assault. Once the case went public, more than 60 women have come forward with similar accusations of sexual assault against the comedian.

21 PHOTOS
Bill Cosby sexual assault trial
See Gallery
Bill Cosby sexual assault trial
Bill Cosby departs Montgomery County Courthouse after the fifth day of the sexual assault trail in Norristown, Pennsylvania, on June 9, 2017. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 12: Camille Cosby enters the courtroom for the sexual assault trial of her husband, entertainer Bill Cosby at the Montgomery County Courthouse on June 12, 2017 in in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79-year-old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by David Maialetti-Pool/Getty Images)
Bill Cosby arrives at the Montgomery County Courthouse for the fifth day of the sexual assault trail in Norristown, Pennsylvania, on June 9, 2017. For the second day the actor and comedian is accompanied by Joe Tory. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
Artist Bird Milliken protests as Bill Cosby departs after the fourth day of the sexual assault trial against him, at Montgomery County Court House, in Norristown, Pennsylvania, on June 8, 2017. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 8: Attorney Gloria Allred walks out of the courtroom during a break in the sexual assault trial of actor Bill Cosby at the Montgomery County Courthouse on June 8, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79-year-old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez-Pool/Getty Images)
Attorney Gloria Allred speaks to media during a break on the fourth day of the Bill Cosby sexual Assault trial in Morristown, PA, on June 8, 2017. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 7: Bill Cosby walks outside the courtroom during a break on the third day of his sexual assault trial in the Montgomery County Courthouse June 7, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79-year-old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 8: Actor Bill Cosby (R) leaves the courtroom with aide Andrew Wyatt for lunch break in Cosby's trial on sexual assault charges at the Montgomery County Courthouse on June 8, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79-year-old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez-Pool/Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 7: Attorney Gloria Allred arrives at the Montgomery County Courthouse on the third day of the Bill Cosby sexual assault trial June 7, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79-year-old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 7: Bill Cosby accuser Andrea Constand arrives at the Montgomery County Courthouse on the third day of Cosby's sexual assault trial June 7, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79 year old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 7: Actor Bill Cosby departs for the day after his trial on sexual assault charges at the Montgomery County Courthouse on June 7, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79-year-old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by Ed Hille-Pool/Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 7: Bill Cosby accuser Andrea Constand arrives at the Montgomery County Courthouse on the third day of Cosby's sexual assault trial June 7, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79 year old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Cosby Survivor Lili Bernard and supporter Carolin Heldman outside the Cosby sexual assault trial at Montgomery County Courthouse, in Norristown, Pennsylvania, on June 5, 2017. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 05: Criminal defense attorney Angela Agrusa arrives to the first day of Bill Cosby court trial at Montgomery County Courthouse on June 5, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Gilbert Carrasquillo/WireImage)
Actor Bill Cosby departs after the first day of the sexual assault trial against him, at Montgomery County Courthouse, in Norristown, Pennsylvania, on June 5, 2017. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 5: Bill Cosby departs the Montgomery County Courthouse after the opening day of the sexual assault trial June 5, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79 year old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 5: Actor Bill Cosby (C) arrives with actress Keshia Knight Pulliam (R) and spokesman Andrew Wyatt for Cosby's trial on sexual assault charges at the Montgomery County Courthouse on June 5, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79 year old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by David Maialetti-Pool/Getty Images)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 05: Actress Keshia Knight Pulliam is seen leaving the first day of Bill Cosby trial on June 5, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Gilbert Carrasquillo/WireImage)
NORRISTOWN, PA - JUNE 5: Bill Cosby arrives with actress Keshia Knight Pulliam (R) at the Montgomery County Courthouse before the opening of the sexual assault trial June 5, 2017 in Norristown, Pennsylvania. A former Temple University employee alleges that the entertainer drugged and molested her in 2004 at his home in suburban Philadelphia. More than 40 women have accused the 79 year old entertainer of sexual assault. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
Attorney Gloria Allred arrives at the Montgomery County Courthouse for the start day of the sexual assault Trial in Norristown, Pennsylvania, on June 5, 2017. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

"She was well-coached," the juror, who spoke on condition of anonymity, told The Inquirer and The Daily News. "Let's face it: She went up to his house with a bare midriff and incense and bath salts. What the heck?"

The juror then added that Cosby had already "paid dearly" with his ruined reputation and should not be made to go through another trial. That said, he still refused to say whether he wanted to find Cosby guilty or innocent.

The juror also said that, at one point, 10 out of the 12 jurors believed Cosby was guilty before three jurors changed their minds and the judge had to announce a mistrial. Throughout the deliberations, jurors had difficulty with legal terms such as "reckless" and "severely impaired," with the juror adding that the language describing the counts of assault was "too legal."

Even though Cosby's defense lawyer spent just six minutes to say that the relationship was consensual, the juror still said that he found Cosby more convincing than the prosecution, which spent five days laying out extensive evidence from the police, legal experts and Constand herself.

He said that Constand should have only seen Cosby at his home if "she was dressed properly and left the incense in the store" and was influenced to go to push forward on the trial years later by her mother.

"No stained garment, no smoking gun, nothing," he said, adding that you could draw little from evidence from decades ago.

He further added that the accusations of 60 women who have since come forward with similar accusations had played no role in his deliberations — he thought many of them made up their claims to get attention.

"This is ridiculous, unbelievable," he said. "I think more than half jumped on the bandwagon."

While the courthouse said that he was proud of having done his civic duty, he does not plan on paying attention if there is a second trial.

"They should've left it closed," he said.

NOW WATCH: What it's like living in North Korea — according to a North Korean defector

See Also:

SEE ALSO: Bill Cosby's jury again asks the definition of 'reasonable doubt' after being deadlocked for 5 days

Read Full Story

Sign up for Entertainment Insider by AOL to get the hottest pop culture news delivered straight to your inbox!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.