The O.J. witness who never testified fears his parole: 'You never know what will make him flip out'


The days leading up to June 12 are never easy ones for Jill Shively — not since 1994, when a late-night salad-bar run near her Brentwood apartment resulted in a near-collision that would change her life. According to Shively, she was speeding east in her Volkswagen Beetle on San Vincente Boulevard, trying to get to the Westward Ho market (now a Bristol Farms) before its 11 p.m. closing time, when a Ford Bronco, with its lights off, came barreling through a red light at the corner of Bundy Drive. She slammed on the brakes and swerved into the next lane to avoid hitting it. The Bronco banked onto a grassy median.

"Everything happened so fast," says Shively, now 56, speaking from her home in Woodland Hills on the eve of the 23rd anniversary of the incident that changed her life. "First I felt fear, then anger. I mean, the self-entitlement! Why was this person driving like this? They had to be drunk." She locked eyes with the driver — a handsome African-American man whom she "knew was a football player right away — the name Marcus Allen popped in my head. The guy began yelling at the car in the westbound lane. That's when I realized it was O.J. Simpson, because I had just seen him in a movie — Naked Gun 33⅓."

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OJ Simpson in court over the years
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OJ Simpson in court over the years
This 21 June 1995 file photo shows former US football player and actor O.J. Simpson looking at a new pair of Aris extra-large gloves that prosecutors had him put on during his double-murder trial in Los Angeles. Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch announced 20 November 2006 the cancellation of a controversial book and television interview involving O.J. Simpson being planned by his News Corp company. AFP PHOTO/Vince BUCCI/FILES (Photo credit should read VINCE BUCCI/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, UNITED STATES: O.J. Simpson (L) talks with attorney Robert Shapiro during an 18 January court hearing in Simpson's double-murder case in Los Angeles, California. Judge Lance Ito ruled that jurors may hear some domestic violence allegations against Simpson. Opening statements in the trial were moved to 23 January. (COLOR KEY: Brown wall) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read Vince Bucci/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 23: O.J. Simpson's children from his first marriage, Jason (L), Arnelle (R) and cousin Terri Baker (C) appear in court 23 January in Los Angeles as the former football great and television celebrity's double-murder trial is expected to begin with opening statements. O.J. Simpson is accused of murdering his ex-wife Nicole Brown-Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman on 12 June 1994. (COLOR KEY: Collar (L) is red) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read RICK MEYER/AFP/Getty Images)
Fred Goldman and Patti Glass Goldman, the father and stepmother of murder victim Ronald Goldman, listen to prosecutor Christopher Darden as he delivers opening statements during the O.J. Simpson murder trial, January 24, Los Angeles, California. (Photo by AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 23: O.J. Simpson (R) looks up during a 23 January court hearing in Los Angeles, Ca, as attorney Johnnie Cochran Jr. reviews doucuments in what should be opening day in Simpson's double-murder trial begins. Several evidenciary issues remain before the trial will be heard in front of the jury. (COLOR KEY: Brown wall.) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
Deputy district attorney Marcia Clark gestures as she addresses the jury for the prosecution's opening statements in the murder trial of O.J. Simpson, Los Angeles, California, January 24, 1995. Simpson was accused of the 12 June 1994 murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown and Ronald Goldman. (Photo by Myung J. Chun/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 24: Judge Lance Ito looks at prosecutor Marcia Clark as he admonishes her for argumentative behavior during her opening statements to the jury in the O.J. Simpson murder trial 24 January in Los Angeles, CA. Ito ended the hearing later, after learning that the court video camera viewed live images of two jurors. Ito may remove cameras from the courtroom because of the incident. (COLOR KEY: Brown wall) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 26: Lead prosecutor Marcia Clark (L) talks with fellow prosecutor Christopher Darden during court proceedings 26 January 1995 in Los Angeles. The OJ Simpson trial was delayed by the hospitalization of prosecutor William Hodgman and continuing fray over the defense's failure to turn over the names of its anticipated witnesses. (COLOR KEY: Wall is brown.) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 31: A picture taken by the Los Angeles Police Department on 01 January 1989 and projected on a screen in the courtroom 31 January 1995 shows Nicole Brown Simpson after her 911 call reporting a spousal abuse episode that defendant O.J. Simpson eventually pleaded no contest to. The picture was displayed by the prosecution during questioning of LAPD Detective John Edwards at the double murder trial of Simpson. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 9: Prosecutors in the O.J. Simpson murder trial Marcia Clark(L) and Christopher Darden(2nd L) show a display of a blood trail 09 February at Nicole Simpson's condominium to the jury and Los Angeles Police Department(LAPD) officer Robert Riske(R) during testimony in Superior Court in Los Angeles. Riske was the first police officer to arrive at the scene where Nicole Simpson and Ron Goldman were murdered. (COLOR KEY:Blue chart.) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 15: Defense attorneys Johnnie Cochran Jr. (R) and Robert Shapiro talk about the prosecution's announcement in court 15 February that the blood found on Nicole Brown Simpon's Bundy residence gate genetically matches that of murder defendant O.J. Simpson. (COLOR KEY: Red in Cochran's tie). AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 15: Double murder defendant O.J. Simpson puts on one of the bloody gloves as a Los Angeles Sheriff's Deputy looks on during the O.J. Simpson murder trial 15 June. One of the gloves was found at the murder scene, while the other was found at Simpson's state. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read SAM MIRCOVICH/AFP/Getty Images)
O.J. Simpson tries on a leather glove allegedly used in the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman during testimony in Simpson's murder trial on June 15, 1995 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Lee Celano/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 21: O.J. Simpson shows the jury a new pair of Aris extra-large gloves, similar to the gloves found at the Bundy and Rockingham crime scene 21 June 1995, during his double murder trial in Los Angeles,CA. Deputy Sheriff Roland Jex(L) and Prosecutor Christopher Darden (R) look on. (Photo credit should read VINCE BUCCI/AFP/Getty Images)
Former professional football player O.J. Simpson speaks during a parole hearing at Lovelock Correctional Center in Lovelock, Nevada, U.S., on Thursday, July 20, 2017. Simpson has been granted parole nine years into a 33-year sentence and could be released as soon as Oct. 1. Photographer: Jason Bean/Pool via Bloomberg
Former professional football player O.J. Simpson, center, listens as his daughter Arnelle Simpson testifies during a parole hearing at Lovelock Correctional Center in Lovelock, Nevada, U.S., on Thursday, July 20, 2017. Simpson has been granted parole nine years into a 33-year sentence and could be released as soon as Oct. 1. Photographer: Jason Bean/Pool via Bloomberg
LOVELOCK, NV - JULY 20: O.J. Simpson reacts after learning he was granted parole at Lovelock Correctional Center July 20, 2017 in Lovelock, Nevada. Simpson is serving a nine to 33 year prison term for a 2007 armed robbery and kidnapping conviction. (Photo by Jason Bean-Pool/Getty Images)
LOVELOCK, NV - JULY 20: O.J. Simpson arrives for his parole hearing at Lovelock Correctional Center July 20, 2017 in Lovelock, Nevada. Simpson is serving a nine to 33 year prison term for a 2007 armed robbery and kidnapping conviction. (Photo by Jason Bean/Reno Gazette-Journal-Pool/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - MAY 17: O.J. Simpson watches his former defense attorney Yale Galanter testify during an evidentiary hearing in Clark County District Court on May 17, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Simpson, who is currently serving a nine-to-33-year sentence in state prison as a result of his October 2008 conviction for armed robbery and kidnapping charges, is using a writ of habeas corpus to seek a new trial, claiming he had such bad representation that his conviction should be reversed. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
VEGAS, NV - MAY 17: O.J. Simpson returns to the courtroom after a lunch break during the fifth day of an evidentiary hearing in Clark County District Court on May 17, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Simpson, who is currently serving a nine-to-33-year sentence in state prison as a result of his October 2008 conviction for armed robbery and kidnapping charges, is using a writ of habeas corpus to seek a new trial, claiming he had such bad representation that his conviction should be reversed. (Photo by Steve Marcus-Pool/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - MAY 17: O.J. Simpson (C) and his defense attorneys Patricia Palm (L) and Ozzie Fumo (R) listen during an evidentiary hearing in Clark County District Court on May 17, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Simpson, who is currently serving a nine-to-33-year sentence in state prison as a result of his October 2008 conviction for armed robbery and kidnapping charges, is using a writ of habeas corpus to seek a new trial, claiming he had such bad representation that his conviction should be reversed. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NV - MAY 14: O.J. Simpson (R) and his defense attorney Patricia Palm appear at an evidentiary hearing in Clark County District Court on May 14, 2013 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Simpson, who is currently serving a nine-to-33-year sentence in state prison as a result of his October 2008 conviction for armed robbery and kidnapping charges, is using a writ of habeas corpus to seek a new trial, claiming he had such bad representation that his conviction should be reversed. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
O.J. Simpson (L) embraces his friend Tom Scotto (R) as his sister Carmelita Durio (R) looks on in court after a guilty verdict was reached during his trial at the Clark County Regional Justice Center on October 3, 2008 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Simpson and co-defendant Clarence 'C.J.' Stewart were found guilty on all charges after standing trial for crimes including felony kidnapping, armed robbery and conspiracy related to a 2007 confrontation with sports memorabilia dealers in a Las Vegas hotel. The verdict comes 13 years to the day after Simpson was acquitted of murdering his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman. STEVE MARCUS/POOL (Photo credit should read Steve Marcus/AFP/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS - OCTOBER 3: O.J. Simpson (R) and his Defense Attorney Yale Galanter (L) talk in court before a guilty verdict is read during his trial at the Clark County Regional Justice Center on October 3, 2008 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Simpson and co-defendant Clarence 'C.J.' Stewart were found guilty on all charges after standing trial for crimes including felony kidnapping, armed robbery and conspiracy related to a 2007 confrontation with sports memorabilia dealers in a Las Vegas hotel. The verdict comes 13 years to the day after Simpson was acquitted of murdering his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman. (Photo by Steve Marcus-Pool/Getty Images)
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In that encounter, which lasted no more than a minute, Shively was on her way from complete anonymity — a single mother with a then-5-year-old daughter working at an office-supplies manufacturer in Brea, California — to becoming a potential star witness in the most sensational murder trial of the 20th century. Hers was a key account that had the potential to place Simpson just blocks away from ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson's Brentwood condominium around the time that she and friend Ron Goldman were brutally murdered.

But Shively never testified at the trial. In a chapter re-created in 2016's Emmy-winning FX miniseries The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story, she agreed to a paid interview with Hard Copy, which led to a tense showdown with the case's lead prosecutor, Marcia Clark.

"Marcia freaked out at me and said I blew her case," recalls Shively, clearly on edge weeks before Simpson's next parole hearing. "She said, 'I was counting on you for my timeline, and you blew it.' " The two lead investigators, Tom Lange (now retired) and Phil Vannatter (who died in 2012), were present, as was Gil Garcetti, the former L.A. district attorney (whose son, Eric, is now L.A.'s mayor). As Shively describes it, all three pushed back against Clark: "Vannatter and Lange said, '[The interview] doesn't mean she didn't see him.' And Garcetti was arguing on my behalf. But Marcia said, 'I don't need her. I have enough evidence.' "

In a recent Facebook rant, Shively calls her interaction with Clark "the worst experience in [her] life," and bemoans Sarah Paulson's Emmy-winning turn as the prosecutor. "[Clark] was terrible and then received an award!"

When reached by THR, Clark declined to comment on Shively's assertions. But in her 1997 book, Without a Doubt, the former prosecutor recalls that Shively first struck her "like a real gem. She was dressed neatly and conservatively for her testimony. She was articulate. She was confident. In fact, Scott Gordon, one my fellow DAs, knew her because their children went to the same school."

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OJ Simpson people involved
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OJ Simpson people involved

Judge Lance Ito, still on the Los Angeles Superior Court bench, has presided over some 500 trials since the Simpson case made him famous. He long ago took his name plate off his courtroom door because it kept getting stolen. He is not standing for re-election this year and will retire in 2015 with few plans other than to learn to play guitar. 

(POO/AFP/Getty Images)

Judge Lance Ito, still on the Los Angeles Superior Court bench, has presided over some 500 trials since the Simpson case made him famous. He long ago took his name plate off his courtroom door because it kept getting stolen. He is not standing for re-election this year and will retire in 2015 with few plans other than to learn to play guitar.

(AP Photo/Bob Galbraith)

Gil Garcetti, Los Angeles district attorney during the Simpson trial, was re-elected to another term in spite of criticism of his handling of the case. He later changed careers, focusing on photography, and traveled the world taking pictures that were published in six books to raise awareness of social needs such as water wells in Africa. He has been consulting director of TV crime dramas, "The Closer" and "Major Crimes." His son, Eric, is mayor of Los Angeles. 

(Ron Galella, Ltd. WireImage)

Gil Garcetti, Los Angeles district attorney during the Simpson trial, was re-elected to another term in spite of criticism of his handling of the case. He later changed careers, focusing on photography, and traveled the world taking pictures that were published in six books to raise awareness of social needs such as water wells in Africa. He has been consulting director of TV crime dramas, "The Closer" and "Major Crimes." His son, Eric, is mayor of Los Angeles.

(Ben Horton/WireImage)

Marcia Clark, who prosecuted Simpson unsuccessfully, was paid $4 million for her memoir of the case and wrote a series of mystery novels. She never tried another case and stopped practicing law, though she has appeared as a TV commentator on high-profile trials.

(Beck Starr/FilmMagic)

Johnnie L. Cochran, Jr., Simpson's lead attorney who coined the phrase, "If it doesn't fit, you must acquit," wrote a memoir revealing his rift with Shapiro over control of the defense case. He expanded his law firm to 15 states and was the success story of the team until he was stricken with brain cancer and died in 2005 at 68.

(David McNew/Getty Images)

Barry Scheck, the lawyer who introduced the science of DNA to jurors and to the public watching on TV, attacked police methods of evidence collection and demolished the prosecution's forensic evidence case. He and co-counsel on the Simpson case, Peter Neufeld, founded The Innocence Project that uses DNA evidence to exonerate wrongly convicted prisoners. They have helped overturn hundreds of cases.

(Amy Sussman/Getty Images for The New Yorker)

F. Lee Bailey, famed for his role in the trials of Dr. Sam Shepard and heiress Patty Hearst, was a part-time member of the "Dream Team" who exposed detective Mark Fuhrman's racist statements. Bailey later was disbarred in Massachusetts and Florida for misconduct in handling a client's case. He continues to seek readmission to the bar and has written a lengthy treatise on why he believes in Simpson's innocence.

(POO/AFP/Getty Images)

F. Lee Bailey, famed for his role in the trials of Dr. Sam Shepard and heiress Patty Hearst, was a part-time member of the "Dream Team" who exposed detective Mark Fuhrman's racist statements. Bailey later was disbarred in Massachusetts and Florida for misconduct in handling a client's case. He continues to seek readmission to the bar and has written a lengthy treatise on why he believes in Simpson's innocence.

(Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

Robert Kardashian, a close friend of Simpson, renewed his lapsed law license to participate in the trial. Simpson stayed at his home after the killings were discovered and Kardashian read to the public a rambling message from Simpson as he was fleeing from police in a white Ford Bronco. Kardashian died at the age of 59 in 2003 from esophageal cancer. His ex-wife, Kris, and his children, Kourtney, Kim, Khloe and Rob, became famous after his death with their reality show, "Keeping Up With the Kardashians."

(Ron Galella/WireImage)

Kato Kaelin, known as America's most famous house guest, was living on Simpson's property when he claimed to hear a bump in the night that prosecutors suggested was Simpson returning from the murders. Kaelin tried to extend his moment in the spotlight to show business after the trial and is now involved in promoting a clothing line called, "Kato's Potatoes."

(Joe Kohen/Getty Images)

Kim Goldman, Ron Goldman's younger sister, was 22 when she burst into hysterical sobs when the not guilty verdict was read. She counsels troubled teens as executive director of the Southern California-based nonprofit The Youth Project and is a frequent speaker to victims' rights group. She is the author of two books. Her latest, "Can't Forgive: My Twenty-Year Battle With O.J. Simpson," was published last month. Goldman, 42, is divorced and lives in a Southern California suburb with her 10-year-old son.

(Photo by Heidi Gutman/ABC via Getty Images)

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The Hard Copy fiasco unfolded about a week after Shively's first appearance before a grand jury, by all accounts a successful day of testimony for the prosecution. A producer cold-called Shively at home and assured her that other witnesses — like Simpson house guest Kato Kaelin and Jose Camacho, who sold Simpson a 15-inch knife (later determined not to have been the murder weapon) — were "doing these interviews and taking payment." Within minutes of Shively agreeing to the interview ("I thought I would make some extra money and go on a vacation," she says), a van was at her home to transport her to the studio. The interview aired that evening.

"The next morning," Clark wrote in her book, "I'd barely stepped out of the elevator on the 18th floor when reporters began asking me whether I'd seen the tabloid TV showHard Copy the night before. ...; The news sent me reeling. But things got worse. On my desk was a fax from a television actor named Brian Patrick Clarke. He was claiming to have lost money to Shively and considered her a consummate liar."

According to Clark, the actor claimed Shively had presented him with a screenplay she said she had written, and that a "production company was about to buy it for $250,000 and wanted Clarke to star in it." He alleged that Shively had talked him into lending her $6,000. The actor later learned that the script "wasn't Shively's," writes Clark. "It was the screenplay for a film in preproduction titled My Life, which starred Michael Keaton and Nicole Kidman."

Clark continues: "We'd been duped. We had no choice but to cut Shively loose." Clark characterizes Shively's Simpson story as "an outright lie."

Shively's version is very different. She claims Clarke was a softball buddy of Simpson's who didn't want to see his pal go to prison. "He made up things to discredit me," she says. She does acknowledge a legal dispute with Clarke, whom she'd met while visiting some friends on the former MGM lot, over credit-card debt. "I had friends on the show Dallas, and he was on Eight Is Enough," she says now. "We settled out of court and can't talk about it."

Jeffrey Toobin, the New Yorker legal reporter who wrote the book on which the FX series was based, spent extensive time with Shively during his reporting and says he's still undecided about whether she's telling the truth. "If her testimony was true, it would have been devastating to Simpson," says Toobin. "From a litigation point of view, the fact that she took money from a tabloid is problematic. That doesn't mean her story wasby any means."

Shively says she still vividly remembers the phone call ordering her down to the DA's office, where a livid Clark was waiting for her, demanding to know what she "was going to do about it. I said I wouldn't take the money — I hadn't been paid yet — but she didn't care. I really felt like I blew it. Maybe I could have helped."

While Shively now thinks that Simpson is guilty, she wasn't convinced of it in 1994. In her memory, that didn't sit well with Clark, who made an intimidating first impression. "I got to the DA's office, and I hear Marcia yelling at someone," recalls Shively. "I was thinking, 'Oh, my God. That's the person I have to talk to?' Then we met, and she immediately let it be known that 'this was her case' and 'what was my story?' "

Shively says she recounted the experience for Clark, including initially thinking it was Marcus Allen behind the wheel. She claims that Clark warned her never to mention Allen's name because "that would create doubt" in front of the grand jury. Then she asked Shively if she thought O.J. was guilty. "I said, 'I don't know.' She asked, 'Well, what do you think happened?' I said, 'He could have gone there, saw what happened and was trying to get out of there. And maybe that's why he was in a hurry to leave.' Marcia said, 'Don't say that.' I was like, 'Then why did you ask me?' " Shively was beginning to feel "like I wasn't protected, like I was the enemy."

Meanwhile, Shively's personal life was unraveling. TV cameras began showing up at her home and work. "I felt betrayed," she says. "There was no safe zone. I lost my job. I remember putting my daughter to bed, and a guy was looking through her window with a camera. It was horrible." The trial rapidly became politicized, dividing the city along racial lines. "I would get people coming up to me saying I was 'part of the white conspiracy.' I'd get phone calls, people camping out outside my door. We hid out at some friends' houses for a while."

Photographed by Damon Casarez

Two years ago, Shively moved to Woodland Hills. But the one-two punch last year of Ryan Murphy's hit dramatization and the Oscar-winning documentary O.J.: Made in America reignited interest in the case and thrust major and minor figures alike back into the spotlight. What Shively saw of the FX series left her cold. "I did not act like that at all," she says of her depiction. "And factual things were wrong — like O.J.'s headlights were on. I would have seen him a lot sooner if his lights had been on. And I wasn't going to get froyo — I was going to Westward Ho."

Shively has stayed in contact with other members of the "O.J. case club," as she calls it, including Tanya Brown, Nicole's youngest sister (introduced to her by Jim Moret, a CNN reporter during the trial who is now with Inside Edition). The pair occasionally touch base to discuss "our lives, what happened during the case, all the emotions we went through, my guilt. We basically talk about how this case has tainted our lives. Our goal is to not allow it to taint us anymore."

She also reached out a year ago to Clark's co-counsel, Christopher Darden, who joined the prosecution after Shively was out of the picture. Shively tracked him down on Facebook — her niece and his son were friends — and expressed her guilt about the case. Darden reassured Shively that "he doesn't hold anything against me. He told me to take care of myself and to let go of this whole thing."

That's easier said than done. News that Simpson could be back on the streets as soon as October makes this year's anniversary particularly tense. Shively still remembers the night when a newly freed Simpson showed up at the same Brentwood Cheesecake Factory where she was dining — and threw a fit when he was turned away at the door. "My daughter is 28 now," she says. "Every year on the day of their murders she's on edge a little bit, because she knows I'm on edge a little bit. The thought of him being paroled is scary, because you never know what will make him flip out again."

Twenty-three years later, however, it's not Simpson but Clark who casts the longest shadow. "I may have made a mistake, but I didn't kill the case," says Shively. "I realize now that all that stuff Marcia did to me was just horrible. They idolize her so much. I just don't understand."

•••

HOW O.J. COULD SOON WALK FREE

Now 69, O.J. Simpson has served nine years at the medium-security Lovelock Correctional Center for a 2007 armed memorabilia heist. The infamous NFL star's second appearance before a Nevada Board of Parole is slated for July, with the date to be finalized by mid-June. At his first parole hearing in 2013 — seen in the opening shots of the Oscar-winning doc O.J.: Made in America — Simpson, who works as a gym custodian and mentors inmates, described himself as a model prisoner. Parole on some of his counts was granted at that hearing, but Simpson still had four mandatory years remaining. In the interim, Hollywood's Simpson-heavy 2016 spurred a renewed appetite for all things Juice. "We've had close to 50 different requests for media access to this hearing," says Nevada hearings examiner David Smith, who has made arrangements for pool cameras to be present. A decision could come that same day — and if parole is granted, Simpson would likely be cleared to return to society in October.

This story first appeared in the June 7 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe.

18 PHOTOS
Key Players in the OJ Simpson Trial
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Key Players in the OJ Simpson Trial
Defense attorney Robert Shapiro (L) sits next to O.J. Simpson during a preliminary hearing following the murders of Simpson's ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman July 7, 1994 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Lee Celano/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 27: Prosecutor Marcia Clark complains to the judge 27 February about a second statement by Rosa Lopez, a key defense witness, that was not released by the defense. Lopez, a housekeeper to a neighbor of O.J. Simpson's, claims to have seen a white Ford Bronco outside his home at around the time the prosecution claim the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman took place. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 19: O.J. Simpson (R) whispers to Defense attorney F. Lee Bailey (L) during testimony of FBI special agent William Bodziak 19 June during the O.J. Simpson murder trial in Los Angeles. Bodziak compared one of O.J. Simpson's tennis shoes to a model of the Italian-made Bruno Magli shoes, which left imprints at the murder scene of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 16: O.J. Simpson defense attorney Alan Dershowitz (standing) gestures during a motion to Judge Lance Ito 16 June in which he said that the standard of juror dismissals must be changed. The defense has accused the prosecution of juror targeting and hiding witnesses. Seated are (L-R) prosecutor Marcia Clark and Scott Gordon. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
Deputy District Attorney Christopher Darden, one of the prosecutors in the OJ Simpson murder trial is shown during a court hearing December 9
OJ Simpson sits in court October 14 with his attorney Robert Shapiro during a hearing in Simpson's murder trial
Defense attorneys Robert Shapiro (L) and Johnnie Cochran, Jr., arrive at the Criminal Courts Building in Los Angeles September 26 for the first day of jury selection in the OJ Simpson murder trial. A protestor's painting on spousal abuse is in the background
Superior Court Judge Lance Ito makes a point during a pre-trial hearing on suppression of evidence in the OJ Simpson murder case September 21 in Los Angeles
Josephine Guarin, housekeeper at OJ Simpson's estate in the Brentwood section of Los Angeles, testifies during a pre-trial hearing on evidence suppression in the OJ Simpson murder case September 22
Prosecution witness Candace Garvey, a friend of Nicole-Brown Simpson, testifes about OJ Simpson's appearance at his daughter's dance recital June 12, 1994, during afternoon court session in OJ Simpson's murder trial
Prosecutor Marcia Clark wears rubber gloves as she places a left-hand glove found at the feet of murder victim Ronald Goldman into a plastic bag during OJ Simpson's murder trial, February 17
Denise Brown (L), sister of Nicole-Brown Simpson, cries as she testifies February 6 about Nicole-Simpson's relationship with O.J. Simpson, during morning court session in Simpson's murder trial. Brown wears "Angel" earrings and pins in memory of her sister
FILE PHOTO 16MAR95 - Los Angeles police detective Mark Fuhrman is shown on the witness stand March 16, 1995 during O.J. Simpson's murder trial in Los Angeles. A bloody fingerprint was found at the scene of the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman but police bungling destroyed it, Fuhrman says in a new book published on February 17. SIMPSON FINGERPRINT
Prosecutor Brian Kelberg points out a wound near Ronald Goldman's ear on an autopsy chart during testimony June 9 in the OJ Simpson murder trial. The Los Angeles County coroner said that Goldman received two small stabs to the neck in addition to fatal slashes, suggesting that he was taunted by his attacker before being killed
Kim Goldman, sister of murder victim Ron Goldman, reacts to the showing of a photograph of her brother's bloody shirt during the OJ Simpson double murder trial in Los Angeles June 26. The prosecution presented the final phase of its case, trace and hair evidence. **POOR QUALITY DOCUMENT
Arnelle Simpson, daughter of murder defendant OJ Simpson, testifies July 10 on her father's behalf in his double murder trial in Los Angeles. Arnelle Simpson is the first witness in the defense's case
Defense witness Robert Heidstra points during his testimony July 12 at O.J. Simpson's murder trial to the area near where he walked his dog on the night [Nicole Simpson and Ronald Goldman] were murdered June 12,1994. The chart is a map of the area around Bundy Drive, site of the murders
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