New docu-series suggests O.J. Simpson's son might have committed notorious murders


A controversial six-part docu-series on the infamous O.J. Simpson murder trial is claiming the disgraced football star's son, Jason, is a person of interest in the 1994 murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.

Read: O.J. Simpson's Forgotten First Wife: Who is Marguerite Whitley?

Is O.J. Innocent? The Missing Evidence is produced by actor Martin Sheen and is causing uproar.

It actually claims that the former Buffalo Bills running back did not murder his ex-wife and her friend on that fateful June night.

One of the investigators on the series is Derrick Lavasseur, a former Rhode Island cop who won Big Brother in 2014.

"On this show, my focus is 100 times more concentrated than it was on Big Brother. Now, you are seeing me in my element. This is what I do every day," he told Inside Edition.

See photos from the O.J. Simpson trial:

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OJ Simpson in court
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OJ Simpson in court
LOS ANGELES, UNITED STATES: O.J. Simpson (L) talks with attorney Robert Shapiro during an 18 January court hearing in Simpson's double-murder case in Los Angeles, California. Judge Lance Ito ruled that jurors may hear some domestic violence allegations against Simpson. Opening statements in the trial were moved to 23 January. (COLOR KEY: Brown wall) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read Vince Bucci/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 23: O.J. Simpson's children from his first marriage, Jason (L), Arnelle (R) and cousin Terri Baker (C) appear in court 23 January in Los Angeles as the former football great and television celebrity's double-murder trial is expected to begin with opening statements. O.J. Simpson is accused of murdering his ex-wife Nicole Brown-Simpson and Ronald Lyle Goldman on 12 June 1994. (COLOR KEY: Collar (L) is red) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read RICK MEYER/AFP/Getty Images)
Fred Goldman and Patti Glass Goldman, the father and stepmother of murder victim Ronald Goldman, listen to prosecutor Christopher Darden as he delivers opening statements during the O.J. Simpson murder trial, January 24, Los Angeles, California. (Photo by AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 23: O.J. Simpson (R) looks up during a 23 January court hearing in Los Angeles, Ca, as attorney Johnnie Cochran Jr. reviews doucuments in what should be opening day in Simpson's double-murder trial begins. Several evidenciary issues remain before the trial will be heard in front of the jury. (COLOR KEY: Brown wall.) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
Deputy district attorney Marcia Clark gestures as she addresses the jury for the prosecution's opening statements in the murder trial of O.J. Simpson, Los Angeles, California, January 24, 1995. Simpson was accused of the 12 June 1994 murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown and Ronald Goldman. (Photo by Myung J. Chun/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 24: Judge Lance Ito looks at prosecutor Marcia Clark as he admonishes her for argumentative behavior during her opening statements to the jury in the O.J. Simpson murder trial 24 January in Los Angeles, CA. Ito ended the hearing later, after learning that the court video camera viewed live images of two jurors. Ito may remove cameras from the courtroom because of the incident. (COLOR KEY: Brown wall) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 26: Lead prosecutor Marcia Clark (L) talks with fellow prosecutor Christopher Darden during court proceedings 26 January 1995 in Los Angeles. The OJ Simpson trial was delayed by the hospitalization of prosecutor William Hodgman and continuing fray over the defense's failure to turn over the names of its anticipated witnesses. (COLOR KEY: Wall is brown.) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 31: A picture taken by the Los Angeles Police Department on 01 January 1989 and projected on a screen in the courtroom 31 January 1995 shows Nicole Brown Simpson after her 911 call reporting a spousal abuse episode that defendant O.J. Simpson eventually pleaded no contest to. The picture was displayed by the prosecution during questioning of LAPD Detective John Edwards at the double murder trial of Simpson. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 9: Prosecutors in the O.J. Simpson murder trial Marcia Clark(L) and Christopher Darden(2nd L) show a display of a blood trail 09 February at Nicole Simpson's condominium to the jury and Los Angeles Police Department(LAPD) officer Robert Riske(R) during testimony in Superior Court in Los Angeles. Riske was the first police officer to arrive at the scene where Nicole Simpson and Ron Goldman were murdered. (COLOR KEY:Blue chart.) AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - FEBRUARY 15: Defense attorneys Johnnie Cochran Jr. (R) and Robert Shapiro talk about the prosecution's announcement in court 15 February that the blood found on Nicole Brown Simpon's Bundy residence gate genetically matches that of murder defendant O.J. Simpson. (COLOR KEY: Red in Cochran's tie). AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read POO/AFP/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 15: Double murder defendant O.J. Simpson puts on one of the bloody gloves as a Los Angeles Sheriff's Deputy looks on during the O.J. Simpson murder trial 15 June. One of the gloves was found at the murder scene, while the other was found at Simpson's state. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read SAM MIRCOVICH/AFP/Getty Images)
This 21 June 1995 file photo shows former US football player and actor O.J. Simpson looking at a new pair of Aris extra-large gloves that prosecutors had him put on during his double-murder trial in Los Angeles. Media tycoon Rupert Murdoch announced 20 November 2006 the cancellation of a controversial book and television interview involving O.J. Simpson being planned by his News Corp company. AFP PHOTO/Vince BUCCI/FILES (Photo credit should read VINCE BUCCI/AFP/Getty Images)
O.J. Simpson tries on a leather glove allegedly used in the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman during testimony in Simpson's murder trial on June 15, 1995 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Lee Celano/WireImage)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JUNE 21: O.J. Simpson shows the jury a new pair of Aris extra-large gloves, similar to the gloves found at the Bundy and Rockingham crime scene 21 June 1995, during his double murder trial in Los Angeles,CA. Deputy Sheriff Roland Jex(L) and Prosecutor Christopher Darden (R) look on. (Photo credit should read VINCE BUCCI/AFP/Getty Images)
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The docu-series airing on Investigation Discovery points a finger at the Heisman Trophy winner's son, Jason, as "a person of interest." Jason, now 47, is said to have had a stormy relationship with his stepmother, Nicole.

Lavasseur told Inside Edition: "Allegedly, Jason Simpson is the one that committed the murders based on some tumultuous relationship between him and Nicole that ultimately led to him confronting her."

He added: "What if there was a second person there and they never entered the crime scene? What if they stayed in the car? There wouldn't be as much trace evidence found at the crime scene."

Bill Dear, a private investigator involved in the series, claims to have discovered the long-lost murder weapon - a knife, which he says was Jason's.

"This was found in our suspect's storage facility. It was designed for one purpose: to cut and to kill," he told Inside Edition. "Markings that Nicole sustained on her scalp came from the butt of this knife."

The series shows the knife and sheath being tested for Simpson's ex-wife and Goldman's blood.

Read: From the Gloves to the Bloodied Clothes, What Happened to Evidence in O.J. Simpson's Trial?

But critics say the theory behind the series is nonsense. Among them is prosecutor Marcia Clark.

"Jason Simpson is the one they're saying is guilty. What is he going to do, say 'it's not me — it's my dad?' What a hideous thing for them to do. I can't even tell you how awful it is and it is baseless," Clark told the Today show.

Reacting to Clark's comments, Lavasseur told Inside Edition: "This is still an open case and we have a responsibility as investigators to vet it. We have a responsibility as investigators to these victims to try and give them closure."

Tom Lange, the retired LAPD lead detective on the case, says he has no doubt O.J. Simpson is guilty and no one else.

"There is nothing exculpatory in this case! It all points at [O.J.] Simpson," he told Inside Edition.

See photos of everyone involved in the trial:

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OJ Simpson people involved
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OJ Simpson people involved

Judge Lance Ito, still on the Los Angeles Superior Court bench, has presided over some 500 trials since the Simpson case made him famous. He long ago took his name plate off his courtroom door because it kept getting stolen. He is not standing for re-election this year and will retire in 2015 with few plans other than to learn to play guitar. 

(POO/AFP/Getty Images)

Judge Lance Ito, still on the Los Angeles Superior Court bench, has presided over some 500 trials since the Simpson case made him famous. He long ago took his name plate off his courtroom door because it kept getting stolen. He is not standing for re-election this year and will retire in 2015 with few plans other than to learn to play guitar.

(AP Photo/Bob Galbraith)

Gil Garcetti, Los Angeles district attorney during the Simpson trial, was re-elected to another term in spite of criticism of his handling of the case. He later changed careers, focusing on photography, and traveled the world taking pictures that were published in six books to raise awareness of social needs such as water wells in Africa. He has been consulting director of TV crime dramas, "The Closer" and "Major Crimes." His son, Eric, is mayor of Los Angeles. 

(Ron Galella, Ltd. WireImage)

Gil Garcetti, Los Angeles district attorney during the Simpson trial, was re-elected to another term in spite of criticism of his handling of the case. He later changed careers, focusing on photography, and traveled the world taking pictures that were published in six books to raise awareness of social needs such as water wells in Africa. He has been consulting director of TV crime dramas, "The Closer" and "Major Crimes." His son, Eric, is mayor of Los Angeles.

(Ben Horton/WireImage)

Marcia Clark, who prosecuted Simpson unsuccessfully, was paid $4 million for her memoir of the case and wrote a series of mystery novels. She never tried another case and stopped practicing law, though she has appeared as a TV commentator on high-profile trials.

(Beck Starr/FilmMagic)

Johnnie L. Cochran, Jr., Simpson's lead attorney who coined the phrase, "If it doesn't fit, you must acquit," wrote a memoir revealing his rift with Shapiro over control of the defense case. He expanded his law firm to 15 states and was the success story of the team until he was stricken with brain cancer and died in 2005 at 68.

(David McNew/Getty Images)

Barry Scheck, the lawyer who introduced the science of DNA to jurors and to the public watching on TV, attacked police methods of evidence collection and demolished the prosecution's forensic evidence case. He and co-counsel on the Simpson case, Peter Neufeld, founded The Innocence Project that uses DNA evidence to exonerate wrongly convicted prisoners. They have helped overturn hundreds of cases.

(Amy Sussman/Getty Images for The New Yorker)

F. Lee Bailey, famed for his role in the trials of Dr. Sam Shepard and heiress Patty Hearst, was a part-time member of the "Dream Team" who exposed detective Mark Fuhrman's racist statements. Bailey later was disbarred in Massachusetts and Florida for misconduct in handling a client's case. He continues to seek readmission to the bar and has written a lengthy treatise on why he believes in Simpson's innocence.

(POO/AFP/Getty Images)

F. Lee Bailey, famed for his role in the trials of Dr. Sam Shepard and heiress Patty Hearst, was a part-time member of the "Dream Team" who exposed detective Mark Fuhrman's racist statements. Bailey later was disbarred in Massachusetts and Florida for misconduct in handling a client's case. He continues to seek readmission to the bar and has written a lengthy treatise on why he believes in Simpson's innocence.

(Gregory Rec/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)

Robert Kardashian, a close friend of Simpson, renewed his lapsed law license to participate in the trial. Simpson stayed at his home after the killings were discovered and Kardashian read to the public a rambling message from Simpson as he was fleeing from police in a white Ford Bronco. Kardashian died at the age of 59 in 2003 from esophageal cancer. His ex-wife, Kris, and his children, Kourtney, Kim, Khloe and Rob, became famous after his death with their reality show, "Keeping Up With the Kardashians."

(Ron Galella/WireImage)

Kato Kaelin, known as America's most famous house guest, was living on Simpson's property when he claimed to hear a bump in the night that prosecutors suggested was Simpson returning from the murders. Kaelin tried to extend his moment in the spotlight to show business after the trial and is now involved in promoting a clothing line called, "Kato's Potatoes."

(Joe Kohen/Getty Images)

Kim Goldman, Ron Goldman's younger sister, was 22 when she burst into hysterical sobs when the not guilty verdict was read. She counsels troubled teens as executive director of the Southern California-based nonprofit The Youth Project and is a frequent speaker to victims' rights group. She is the author of two books. Her latest, "Can't Forgive: My Twenty-Year Battle With O.J. Simpson," was published last month. Goldman, 42, is divorced and lives in a Southern California suburb with her 10-year-old son.

(Photo by Heidi Gutman/ABC via Getty Images)

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