Exclusive: New terrorism data breaks down ISIS's deadly year

President Obama Update On Fight Against ISIS

Few people heard about the first ISIS attack in the United States. On October 23, 2014, a self-radicalized Muslim man charged at four New York City police officers with a hatchet, striking one in the arm and another in the head. Both officers survived, but their assailant, 32-year-old Zale Thompson, was shot dead on the scene. The Islamic State later claimed to have inspired Thompson with its September "call to arms."

Since then, ISIS attacks outside the Middle East have grown far more public -- and deadly. Massacres in places like Paris, Southern California, Brussels and Orlando have transformed the organization from a faraway problem to an existential threat to Western civilization.

The attacks spread fear and confusion through the public, helping bolster political movements that run counter to many Western nations' foundational principles of religious freedom and cultural tolerance. Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump repeatedly used the attacks to justify a temporary ban on Muslim immigration to the U.S., anti-immigration rhetoric helped push the United Kingdom out of the EU and far-right political parties have surged in Europe in a way unseen since World War II.

Devastating images of Falluja after years of ISIS occupation

19 PHOTOS
What Falluja looks like after years of ISIS occupation
See Gallery
What Falluja looks like after years of ISIS occupation
A view is seen of streets in Falluja after government forces recaptured the city from Islamic State militants, Iraq, June 27, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
A view of streets in Falluja, Iraq, June 26, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
Destroyed buildings from clashes are seen on the outskirt of Falluja, Iraq, June 20, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
Damaged buildings are seen from clashes in Falluja, Iraq, after government forces recaptured the city from Islamic State militants, June 30, 2016. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad
Damaged mosque is seen in Falluja, Iraq, after government forces recaptured the city from Islamic State militants, June 30, 2016. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad
A view of a street in Falluja, Iraq, after government forces recaptured the city from Islamic State militants, June 30, 2016. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad
Members of Iraqi government forces celebrate on a street in Falluja after government forces recaptured the city from Islamic State militants, Iraq, June 27, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
A member of Iraqi counterterrorism forces walks with his weapon in Falluja, Iraq, June 26, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
A member of the Iraqi counterterrorism forces stands by an Islamic State militants weapons factory in Falluja, Iraq, June 23, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A member of the Iraqi security forces looks at explosives abandoned by Islamic State militants at a school in Falluja, Iraq, June 25, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
Rocket-propelled grenades left behind by Islamic State militants are seen at a school, following clashes in Falluja, Iraq, June 25, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
A book belonging to Islamic State militants is seen in Falluja after government forces recaptured the city from Islamic State militants, Iraq, June 27, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
Burnt out prison cells belonging to Islamic State militants are seen in Falluja after government forces recaptured the city from Islamic State militants, Iraq, June 27, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A burnt out prison cell belonging to Islamic State militants is seen in Falluja after government forces recaptured the city from Islamic State militants, Iraq, June 27, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
Members of the Shi'ite Badr Organisation inspect a factory abandoned by Islamic State militants, in Falluja, Iraq, June 25, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
A member of the Iraqi security forces tears up a signboard of the Islamic State militants in Falluja, Iraq, after government forces recaptured the city from Islamic State militants, June 30, 2016. REUTERS/Ahmed Saad TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Iraqi counterterrorism forces pose for a picture in Falluja, Iraq, June 26, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A fighter from the Iraqi Shi'ite Badr Organization holds his rifle in an underground tunnel built by Islamic State fighters on the outskirts of Falluja, Iraq, May 28, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

As the Western world struggles through its identity crisis over how to combat terrorism, the Islamic State continues to ravage the Middle East and Africa. In Iraq and Syria, the organization still controls large swaths of territory, subjecting millions of people to its corrupted brand of Sharia law. ISIS also conducts military operations in Libya and Egypt, and has declared provinces in eight other countries where it orchestrates frequent attacks. Still, the vast majority of the group's violence goes unreported by the mainstream media.

Using never-before-seen data from counterterrorism intelligence firm IntelCenter, Graphiq politics site InsideGov examines ISIS attacks by the numbers, breaking down the facts and figures you need to better understand this brutal organization.

The World's Most Deadly Terror Organization

Though the Islamic State has dominated U.S. news and political debate for years, it's not the world's only terrorist organization. A number of other groups, including the Taliban and al-Shabab, still inflict massive loss of life around the globe.

SEE ALSO: Ivanka Trump's brother-in-law will reportedly be voting for Hillary Clinton

That said, the Islamic State is by far the deadliest terrorist group of 2016. From Jan. 1 through July 19, ISIS killed 6,742 people and injured another 6,076 worldwide. That's almost double the total casualties of the next eight deadliest terrorist organizations combined.

In the above visualization, attacks on "Individuals" mostly include executions.

IntelCenter's data only covers 2016 Islamic State attacks through July 19. If violence continues at the current rate, more than 23,000 people worldwide will be victims of ISIS attacks by the end of the year.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.