'SNL's' Michael Che tries to find minorities with a game of 'Trumpemon Go' at GOP Convention

Watch SNL hosts ask random people for their Donald Trump impressions

Saturday Night Live's Michael Che introduced the new game "Trumpemon Go" on Wednesday night at the Republican National Convention.

During MSNBC's "Weekend Update" segment hosted by Che and Colin Jost, Che stood on the floor of the convention, "playing America's hottest new mobile app where you've got to catch the rarest creature of them all: minorities at the RNC."

Playing Trumpemon Go, Che walked around the convention floor trying to find black people at the GOP's event, or "as Trump would always say, let's round up some brown people."

The video even featured a cartoon version of Donald Trump with the game's "slogan": "Catch 'em all. Get 'em outta here."

Kate McKinnon also appeared during the "Weekend Update" segment, reprising her Ruth Bader Ginsburg character from SNL. Watch the Trumpemon Go segment below.

Check out more from the convention in the gallery below!

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Chaos at the Republican National Convention
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Chaos at the Republican National Convention
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest on the floor during on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates from Texas oppose a roll call vote on the floor during on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest on the floor during on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Republican National Convention delegates yell and scream as the Republican National Committee Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces to hold a roll-call vote, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A Donald Trump-supporting delegate cheers while holding a Trump banner as the Republican National Convention Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest onm the floor on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest on the floor during on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Delegates protest on the floor during the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
Delegates react to a rule committee proposal on the opening day of the Republican National Convention at the Quicken Loans arena in Cleveland, Ohio on July 18, 2016. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as the Republican presidential nominee. / AFP / DOMINICK REUTER (Photo credit should read DOMINICK REUTER/AFP/Getty Images)
Anti-Trump activists march in protest outside the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. The Republican Party opened its national convention Monday, kicking off a four-day political jamboree that will anoint billionaire Donald Trump as its presidential nominee. / AFP / Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
CLEVELAND, OH - JULY 18: Former Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli (L) along with other delegates from Virginia chant for a rule call vote on the first day of the Republican National Convention on July 18, 2016 at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Cleveland, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Republican National Convention kicks off on July 18. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
An opponent of the Republican National Convention Rules Committee's report and rules changes screams as the Republican party tries to repel the efforts of anti-Trump forces by refusing to hold a roll-call vote on the report and changes, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Segar
Republican National Convention delegates yell and scream as the Republican National Committee Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces to hold a roll-call vote, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A Republican National Convention delegates yells as the Republican National Committee Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces to hold a roll-call vote, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
An opponent of the Republican National Convention Rules Committee's report and rules changes screams as the Republican party tries to repel the efforts of anti-Trump forces by refusing to hold a roll-call vote on the report and changes, at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Brian Snyder
A Republican National Convention delegate cheers as others yell and scream as the Republican National Committee Rules Committee announces that it will not hold a recorded vote on the Rules Committee's Report and rejects the efforts of anti-Trump forces to hold a roll-call vote at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., July 18, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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