6 reasons kissing is good for your health

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The History of Kissing

For many people, kissing can be the start of something new or the complete opposite. It can tell you a lot about a person, who you are, and how you are together. It can tell you about your future, and if it's going to include the other kisser or not.

We can all agree on the emotional and mental benefits of kissing. A spark, a fun time, a great end to an even better date.

But what about the physical perks? It's been found that kissing has a slew of health benefits -- the list is enough for you to forget about mono anytime soon.

1. It fights cavities

Break out those pearly whites, because kissing is known to rid your mouth of bacteria and plaque. Your dentist would be proud.

2. It makes you look younger

It's a muscle workout. If you're one of those who duck-faces in every selfie, you don't even have to kiss to know this. Making out is a natural facelift because of all the muscle tightening.

3.It reduces blood pressure by getting your heart going.

Your blood vessels dilate - maybe that's why you feel your heart pounding before you go in for a big smooch.

4. It can get rid of headaches or cramps for the same reason.

5. Burning calories

If the kiss is really passionate, it can burn 2 calories a minute....better than the treadmill any day.

6. Kissing as meditation

As in, namaste. It's a natural stress reliever. It helps you connect with the other person, which yields to your wellbeing and relationships.

Furthermore, aside from a plethora of other biological reasons, kissing is just plain ole fun. That's a reason in and of itself, right?

Pucker up!

Scroll through below for more pics on kissing:

5 PHOTOS
V-J Day Kiss in Times Square 1945 & recreations
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V-J Day Kiss in Times Square 1945 & recreations
UNITED STATES - AUGUST 14: Army National Guard Capt. Ben Summers and girlfriend Elizabeth Booher kiss as they join dozens of couples in Times Square for a group kiss on the anniversary of the end of World War 2. Summers, an Afghanistan War veteran, also proposed to his lady friend as the couples mimicked the famous shot, captured by photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt, of a sailor kissing a nurse on Broadway on V-J Day, 62 years ago. (Photo by Michael Appleton/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
SAN DIEGO, CA – September 7, 2008 : Per and Dorene Piencka, (CQ) of Norwalk, CT, make a kissing pose for their scrapbook next to J. Seward Johnson's sculpture 'Unconditional Surrender' next to the USS Midway Aircraft Carrier at the San Diego Embarkadero. Unconditional Surrender, which is 25 feet high and weighs 6,000 pounds, is a three–dimensional interpretation of a photo taken by Alfred Eisenstaedt of a Sailor kissing a nurse in Times Square, New York City on Aug. 14, 1945, following the announcement of V–J Day. TheEmbarcadero is a popular scenic section of waterfront located next to the downtown area. It has sweeping views of San Diego Bay and many tourist attractions. (Photo by Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - AUGUST 14: Gredorieo Smith and Berity Rees (right), a couple on lunch break, join dozens of other couples in Times Square for a group kiss on the anniversary of the end of World War 2. The couples mimicked the famous shot, captured by photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt, of a sailor kissing a nurse on Broadway on V-J Day, 62 years ago. (Photo by Michael Appleton/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
NEW YORK - AUGUST 14: Carl Muscarello and Edith Shain, who claim to be the nurse and sailor in the famous photograph taken on V-J Day, kiss next to a sculpture based on the photograph in Times Square to commemorate the 60th anniversary of the end of World War II August 14, 2005 in New York City. Alfred Eisenstaedt took the famous photograph in Times Square but did not note the names of the people in the picture. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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