Jordan Fisher dishes about his highly-anticipated EP

Jordan Fisher dishes about his highly-anticipated EP
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You probably recognize Jordan Fisher from his jaw-dropping performance as Doody in "Grease Live!" Or maybe you knew him from his recurring role in the hit television series "Secret Life of the American Teenager." But if you think that Fisher's talents only rest with Broadway show tunes or dramatic acting, think again.

Jordan Fisher's latest single "All About Us" is proving that he also has what it takes to break it in the pop music industry. Rooted in soul and R&B, the track hopes to infuse some of the great sounds Fisher used to grow up listening to, like Stevie Wonder and Usher. But with an added twist, the song also brings together elements of dance music and traditional pop, creating a sound that cannot be confined by genre. It's a testament to Jordan Fisher's soon to be position as a musical visionary.

Only a few weeks old, "All About Us" has already captivated a million viewers on YouTube alone, and has quickly spread to local radio stations and summer playlists everywhere. It's the type of success young artists dream of.

Safe to say, Jordan Fisher will soon become a household name in the music industry.

On the heels of his single's release, we spoke with the talented singer/songwriter to talk about what influences went into his upcoming EP (set to debut in August), how "All About Us" came to life, and more!

YouShouldKnow is a feature that showcases up-and-coming social stars. To see more of past interviews, click here. And head over to AOL.com at 6 p.m. ET for more exclusives on Jordan Fisher!

What musical influences of yours went into this upcoming EP?

It's a great question. Everybody is a little different. You can grow up listening to the same artists I grew up listening to and the way they influence your music is entirely subjective. It's all dependent on the entire record you're creating and what you're trying to interpret through your music and how you do that through your lyrics and melody. I grew up listening to Lionel Richie, Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Prince, Usher, 98 Degrees, Boyz II Men, literally anything. I even listened to Rascal Flatts and Faith Hill. But the guys and girls who really did this for me were those who revolutionized pop and soul. To me, that was the root of vocal performance and that's where the direction of my record was concerned. My mission was to take what I grew up listening to and figuring out a way to modernize it and turn it into something that could work with 2016 radio, but also pay homage to those greats. It was to really reintroduce the root of soul and R&B but in a pop format to my generation. That's definitely something you hear on each song on the record so I'm excited to share that with people.

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What went into making your single "All About Us" from start to finish?
From the beginning, I knew the sound I wanted to create. Taking that, flushing it out and making it a reality is a different beast. Especially when you're first starting out as an artist and just coming out on the scene. People see me as a TV and film actor but the musical artistry for me was always there. It's a matter of meeting the right people and going on those blind dates and writing 90-100 songs and figuring out who you connect with. I started working with Oak Felder of Pop & Oak and of course he's worked with everyone. He became a bit of a big brother to me in the music world and I explained to him the sound that I wanted to create and he said, "This is literally what I want to be doing right now." I cut what was the skeleton version of "All About Us" last January.

I am a songwriter and I love making music for myself in general. That said, I know that there are a million and one amazing songs in the world that no one will ever hear because artists don't cut them. Look at Frank Sinatra or Elvis Presley; they didn't write anything that was on their records. They just interpreted the words. They performed songs and were emotionally connected to and were able to properly interpret those songs. And that said, I've written over half of the record, which I'm proud and excited about, but I'm also very fortunate to have a handful of songs that I didn't write that meant a lot ot me. "All About Us" is one of those songs. I got the song and I freaked out. I heard the song and took it to Oak. We broke the song down, re-constructed it, and re-cut it. It was a done deal as far as the first single was concerned. It felt like the best way to introduce myself as an artist.

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How does it feel to realize just how quickly and how far your music is spreading?
It's surreal you know. As an artist you make music and hope and pray people hear what you have to say. The fact that's it's becoming a reality and I'm able to play these smaller, intimate shows right now is the only time it's going to be like this. And getting to know people from the very beginning. Seeing people sing a long to a song that has barely impacted radio yet is surreal. It means a lot. Like I said, music is subjective and everyone connects to it differently. As powerful as it is, I get to be part of that wave of people in the world who get to make something from nothing. And when people listen to it and some people even like it, that is a special thing.

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Where do you see the progression of your career going in the next few years?
It will really be focused on exactly what I'm doing now. It will mature with me and it will gain new stories, vantage points, and wisdom along with me as I grow up as an artist and human. I think that it will naturally and organically evolve over time. Justin Timberlake and Usher are two of my biggest current influences, specifically Justin. I think he's a perfect example of how I see my music evolving. I definitely don't emulate anybody and I feel like I'm doing something no one else is doing and I'm really excited about that, but if I could model my career off of anybody it would 100% be Justin Timberlake. He's advanced and evolved as an artist, and it seems like everything he puts out is better and better. He's found a way to stay true to his artistry. He's evolved with the times and generations, and he does it in a really powerful way. And that's how I see my trajectory unfolding.

YouShouldKnow is a feature that showcases up-and-coming social stars. To see more of past interviews, click here. And head over to AOL.com at 6 p.m. ET for more exclusives on Jordan Fisher!

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