Mark Zuckerberg to decide Peter Thiel's fate on Facebook board

Gawker Media Wants a Loan to Prepare for Bankruptcy Fire Sale

Will Peter Thiel keep his seat on the Facebook board of directors despite public objection? That's something founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg will decide at the company's annual shareholder meeting on Monday.

SEE ALSO: 6 Truth-Bombs: Why Peter Thiel's Stealth Campaign to Kill Gawker Is Dangerous

Thiel's re-election is technically up for shareholder vote, but as Zuckerberg has more than 60 percent of Facebook's total voting power from his ownership, the decision is his.

While Thiel's business acumen hasn't been called into question, his ethics have. The billionaire bankrupted Gawker by secretly funding Hulk Hogan's defamation lawsuit against the company. Many believe this move was motivated by revenge, after the now-defunct Gawker site Valleywag outed Thiel as gay in 2007.

See images of Facebook through the years:

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Facebook over the years
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Facebook over the years

The original Facebook homepage from 2004 with a small picture of Al Pacino in the top left corner.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Mark Zuckerberg originally described himself as not only the founder of Facebook, but also as the "Master and Commander" and "Enemy of the State."

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Here's what a Facebook group page looked like in 2005.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

For comparison, this is what a Facebook group page looks like today.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

The Facebook homepage in 2005 also listed all of the schools the social network was in -- and still included the photo of Al Pacino.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

The company decided to drop the "the" from its name in 2005, after it bought the domain Facebook.com for $200,000.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

We love this gem about "poking" from one of the original FAQ pages.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Facebook's homepage in 2006 was a stripped-back affair, doing away with the list of schools in favor of a simple login option.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Mark Zuckerberg's profile in 2006.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Facebook launched the News Feed to display all your friends' activity in a single timeline in 2006.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

At the same time, Facebook introduced the Mini-Feed. But the entire concept of a News Feed resulted in some very public outrage. Some users even went so far to call one of Facebook's product managers the devil.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Facebook's 2007 homepage contained the first instance of its now-synonymous logo and offered the "latest news" from friends.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

The Facebook of 2008 continued to refine the homepage and offered options for signing up.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Facebook gained the "connected world" diagram in 2009, which lasted all the way until 2011.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

In 2009, Facebook's home page also got a facelift. Posts started to stream through the News Feed in real-time.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

That same year, Facebook also introduced its algorithm for determining the order in which status updates should be displayed.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Facebook changed its logo font in 2010 but left the homepage much the same.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

2010 was also when Facebook brought notifications to the top navigation bar following yet another redesign.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Facebook also rolled out a new, more visual profile in 2010. It added a row of recently tagged images below your name and basic profile information.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Facebook left the design the same in 2011, but made the input boxes used to log in clearer.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Facebook launched the News Ticker in 2011 so users could keep up with their friends while browsing through other parts of Facebook.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

The Facebook Timeline feels like it's been around since the beginning. But it launched in 2011 to act as a virtual timeline of your entire life.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Facebook also split its instant messaging into a different app called Messenger in 2011. It's now got more than 800 million monthly users.

Photo courtesy: iTunes

Facebook swapped out the connected world diagram for a phone in 2012 as its users moved from desktop to mobile. Today, over 800 million people access Facebook on mobile everyday.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Facebook started flooding the News Feed with sponsored stories in January 2012.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Facebook settled on a design in 2013 that it would stay with for the next few years.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

This is what Facebook's mobile app looked like when it first launched.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

It has since been completely redesigned.

Photo courtesy: WayBack Machine

Facebook also owns a bunch of other popular apps, most notably Instagram, which the company bought for $1 billion in 2012. With more than 400 million monthly users, that seems like a steal nowadays.

Photo courtesy: Business Insider

2015 was a big year for Facebook that saw its first ever day with one billion users online simultaneously. The company had figured out how to make money from mobile too, turning it into a $300 billion business.

Photo courtesy: Max Slater-Robins/WayBack Machine

Today, more than 1.5 billion people use the social network every single month.

Photo courtesy: Facebook

And more than 1.4 billion people use it on their mobile phones every month. Not bad, considering 12 years ago smartphones didn't even exist.

Photo courtesy: Facebook

Here's the Facebook homepage today, on its 12th birthday.
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The Writers Guild of America, East launched a petition last week calling on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to remove the billionaire cofounder of PayPal from his company's board of directors.

"We know that he's not a friend of the free press," WGAE executive director Lowell Peterson said of Thiel in an interview with TheWrap. "We know that he feels that the elite — or the plutocracy, if you will — should have pretty broad discretion to do whatever it wants above scrutiny by the media, above control by the public in terms of democratic structure."

The WGAE sees the entrepreneur's influence on Facebook as a further threat to the future of all media.

"Facebook is the portal through which so much news, particularly online news, is accessed and even sent out now," Peterson added. "[News outlets] depend on social media like Facebook for their survival, for getting their message out, for getting their stories and videos out."

Facebook is already battling the perception that it has a liberal bias. In May, there were reports that Facebook editors blacklisted conservative topics and publications from appearing in the Trending Topics sidebar next to users' primary news feeds.

Zuckerberg was quick to shoot down those reports, calling for an investigation and telling conservatives, "We have found no evidence that this report is true. If we find anything against our principles, you have my commitment that we will take additional steps to address it."

At the Code Conference in May, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg stated Thiel would retain his seat on the board. "Peter did what he did on his own. Not as a board member," Sandberg said of his Gawker revenge quest. When asked directly if he would stay, she replied "yes."

Come Monday, it'll be up to Zuckerberg to determine if Thiel's personal principles go against Facebook's principles.

Read original story Mark Zuckerberg to Decide Peter Thiel's Fate on Facebook Board At TheWrap

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