Donald Trump reacts to Obama's visit to Hiroshima: 'Why doesn't he discuss Pearl Harbor?'

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Trump dismisses Obama's visit to Hiroshima

Donald Trump on Saturday invoked the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor in reaction to President Barack Obama's Friday speech in Hiroshima, the site of the world's first atomic bombing.

In a tweet, the presumptive Republican presidential nominee criticized Obama for visiting the site while neglecting to mention the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor.

"Does President Obama ever discuss the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor while he's in Japan? Thousands of American lives lost. #MDW," Trump wrote.

The country and top Japanese leaders have on numerous occasions expressed remorse for the nation's aggression in the lead-up to World War II.

Photos from Hiroshima:

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Looking back: Atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima
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Donald Trump reacts to Obama's visit to Hiroshima: 'Why doesn't he discuss Pearl Harbor?'
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1754: Hiroshima after the dropping of the atom bomb in August 1945. USAF photograph. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1754: Survivors of the explosion of the Atom bomb at Hiroshima 1945 suffering the effects of radiation. ICRC photograph. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, firestorms after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
1945: Atomic bomb damage at Hiroshima with a burnt out fire engine amidst the rubble. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
World War II, Human shadow on bank steps, in Hiroshima after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945 Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, shadow of a tap on a pipeline at Hiroshima after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
6th August 1945: The twisted wreckage of a theatre, located 800 metres from the epicentre of the atomic explosion at Hiroshima. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
HIROSHIMA, JAPAN: This September 1945 file picture shows the remaining of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industry Promotion Building, known as the Atomic-Bomb Dome, which was later preserved as a monument. (Photo credit should read AFP/Getty Images)
HIROSHIMA, JAPAN - NOVEMBER 26: Atomic Bomb Dome stands among fallen autumn leaves at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on November 26, 2014 in Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images)
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Obama did not apologize for the US' decision to use nuclear weapons, but he was nonetheless rebuked by some conservatives for his decision to visit the nuclear memorial site at all.

In his speech, Obama criticized the colonial motivations that put Japan on the path to war with the US in the first place.

"The war grew out of the same base instinct for domination or conquest that had caused conflicts among the simplest tribes, an old pattern amplified by new capabilities and without new constraints," Obama said.

Obama also warned of the ability for mankind to "destroy itself" with nuclear weapons, and asserted that the world would be better off without them.

"We must have the courage to escape the logic of fear and pursue a world without them," Obama said of nuclear weapons.

He added: "We may not realize this goal in my lifetime, but persistent effort can roll back the possibility of catastrophe."

During his trip, Obama met with several survivors of the 1945 atomic bombing, who were children at the time. The final death toll from the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki is estimated at just below 200,000 people, the majority of whom were civilians, as well as forced Korean laborers and a small number of American troops being held as prisoners of war.

Trump has been a critic of the close relationship between the US and Japan that has been rebuilt over the past three-plus decades. The presumptive Republican nominee has asserted that the Japanese — along with countries like Mexico, China, and South Korea — have unfairly benefited from globalization to America's detriment. He has also accused Japan of deliberately weakening its currency to stimulate exports.

Photos from the attack on Pearl Harbor:

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Attack on Pearl Harbor - Dec. 7, 1941
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Donald Trump reacts to Obama's visit to Hiroshima: 'Why doesn't he discuss Pearl Harbor?'
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour, December 7, 1941, United States, Japan - World War II, Narional archives. Washington. (Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)
US ships 'Virginia' and 'Tennessee' on fire after the Pearl Harbor attack, December 7, 1941, World War II, Washington, National archives, . (Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941, World War II, Washington, National archives, . (Photo by: Photo12/UIG via Getty Images)
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More alarmingly to some US and Japanese foreign-policy experts, the real-estate magnate also suggested ending the decades-long strategic agreement between the US and Japan that allows the US to maintain bases in the Japanese archipelago in exchange for US military protection in the case of an attack on Japan.

As Foreign Policy has reported, most Americans are content with the state of the US-Japan relationship, though the relationship is less popular among Americans who identify as Republican.

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