Obama arrives in Hiroshima for historic visit

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Obama Has Opportunity to Heal Lingering Wounds in Hiroshima Visit

HIROSHIMA, Japan — President Barack Obama laid a wreath at the Hiroshima memorial on Friday, becoming the first sitting U.S. president to visit the site of the devastating atomic bombing.

Some 140,000 people were killed when the U.S. dropped an atomic bomb on the city on Aug. 6, 1945.

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A helicopter and motorcade brought Obama to the Hiroshima Peace Park Memorial, where he spent a short time in the site's museum and then solemnly placed a wreath at the arched monument.

He told a gathering of officials and survivors that "death fell from the sky and the world was changed" when the bomb fell, describing how a "wall of fire destroyed a city and demonstrated that mankind possessed the means to destroy itself."

Obama paid tribute to "all the innocents kill across the arc of that terrible war."

"Mere words cannot give voice to such suffering," he said. "But we have a shared responsibility to look directly into the eye of history and ask what we must do differently to curb such suffering again."

The words he inscribed in the memorial site's guest book echoed that message:

"We have known the agony of war. Let us now find the courage, together, to spread peace, and pursue a world without nuclear weapons," Obama wrote.

Before visiting the memorial Obama met with U.S. servicemen and their families at Marine Corps Air Station Iwakuni in Hiroshima. He was joined by U.S. Ambassador to Japan Caroline Kennedy.

RELATED: Looking back: Atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima

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Looking back: Atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima
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Obama arrives in Hiroshima for historic visit
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1754: Hiroshima after the dropping of the atom bomb in August 1945. USAF photograph. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - CIRCA 1754: Survivors of the explosion of the Atom bomb at Hiroshima 1945 suffering the effects of radiation. ICRC photograph. (Photo by Universal History Archive/Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, firestorms after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
1945: Atomic bomb damage at Hiroshima with a burnt out fire engine amidst the rubble. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
World War II, Human shadow on bank steps, in Hiroshima after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945 Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
World War II, shadow of a tap on a pipeline at Hiroshima after the explosion of the atom bomb in August 1945, Japan. (Photo by: Universal History Archive/UIG via Getty Images)
6th August 1945: The twisted wreckage of a theatre, located 800 metres from the epicentre of the atomic explosion at Hiroshima. (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)
HIROSHIMA, JAPAN: This September 1945 file picture shows the remaining of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industry Promotion Building, known as the Atomic-Bomb Dome, which was later preserved as a monument. (Photo credit should read AFP/Getty Images)
HIROSHIMA, JAPAN - NOVEMBER 26: Atomic Bomb Dome stands among fallen autumn leaves at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on November 26, 2014 in Hiroshima, Japan. (Photo by Yuriko Nakao/Getty Images)
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He called the servicemen as the "backbone of our alliance" and told the troops his visit to Hiroshima was an opportunity to "honor the memory" of all those who were lost in World War II.

"It's a testament to how even the most painful divides can be bridged," Obama said. "How our two nations — former adversaries — cannot just become partners, but become the best of friends and the strongest of allies."

The White House had stressed Obama would not apologize for America's use of the bombs in brief remarks at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park.

While an apology would please some in Japan, it would undoubtedly alienate Americans back home — especially giving the trip's timing just ahead of Memorial Day — who credit the bomb with ending the war.

Several survivors of the bombing have said they're not looking for an apology — just change.

"The movement to abolish nuclear weapons hasn't progressed and in order to raise the momentum we're hoping that President Obama's visit will do just that," 73-year-old Kunihiko Iida told NBC News.

Calling the atomic bombing "an inflection point in modern history," Obama earlier said his visit to the memorial will underscore "the sense of urgency that we should all have" toward nuclear disarmament.

"It's not only a reminder of the terrible toll of World War II and the death of innocents across continents but it's also to remind ourselves that the job's not done," he said Thursday.

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