Baby bison euthanized after tourists kidnapped it because it looked cold

National Park Service: Bison Calf Picked By Up Tourists Euthanized

The National Parks Service announced on Monday that the bison calf captured by tourists last week was euthanized.

Mashable reported Sunday that a father and son kidnapped a bison calf, placed it in their SUV and brought it to Lamar Buffalo Ranch in Wyoming last Monday, because they said that it looked cold and they feared for its wellbeing.

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"[P]ark rangers tried repeatedly to reunite the newborn bison calf with the herd. These efforts failed," the National Parks Service wrote in a post on its website. "The bison calf was later euthanized because it was abandoned and causing a dangerous situation by continually approaching people and cars along the roadway."

The post also highlighted that the capture of the bison was incredibly dangerous because, "adult animals are very protective of their young and will act aggressively to defend them."

The father and son who captured the baby animal were ticketed for their actions.

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Karen Richerson, a bystander who saw the father and son pull up with the bison in the vehicle, said the two had genuine concern for the animal.

"They were seriously worried that the calf was freezing and dying," she told told East Idaho News.

Richardson snapped this photo and posted it to Facebook, urging tourists to leave wildlife alone.

"Approaching wild animals can drastically affect their well-being and, in this case, their survival," the National Parks Service wrote on its website.

The National Parks Service also reminds us that park regulations require people stay 25 yards away from wildlife and 100 yards away from bears and wolves.

Image: Facebook, Karen Richardson

"Disregarding these regulations can result in fines, injury, and even death. The safety of these animals, as well as human safety, depends on everyone using good judgment and following these simple rules," the post reads.

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