Gates Foundation backs Takeda polio vaccine with $38M grant

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Could Polio Be Eradicated by 2018?

LONDON (Reuters) -- Japan's Takeda Pharmaceuticals is to get $38 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to develop a crucial, low-cost polio vaccine for use in developing countries.

As part of a global plan to eradicate the crippling disease, of which experts say the world could see the last case this year, countries will need to switch from using oral polio vaccine (OPV) to using so-called inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) to ensure the disease does not reappear.

Experts fear a substantial worldwide shortage of IPV once every country in the world is ready to make the switch, and polio eradication strategists have been looking at how to avert that shortfall by encouraging new manufacturers into the sector.

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Gates Foundation backs Takeda polio vaccine with $38M grant

HIV/AIDS: as of 2012, roughly 36 million deaths worldwide since discovery; 1.3 million deaths in 2013 alone

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Tuberculosis: caused between 1.3 and 1.5 million deaths in 2013

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Malaria: up to 855,000 deaths in 2013

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Pneumonia: results in approx. 4 million deaths per year

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Creuztfeldt-Jakob Disease: 100% fatal

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Middle East respiratory syndrome: 41% fatal

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Rabies: up to 100% fatal if left untreated

(Photo: Brain of a rabies patient showing negri bodies in the cerebellum, via Getty Images)

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Chris Elias, the Gates Foundation's head of global development, said the partnership would help "ensure that the world has enough vaccine to get the job done and maintain a polio-free world."

Takeda said in a statement it would use the Gates funding to develop, license and supply at least 50 million doses per year of so-called Sabin-strain inactivated poliovirus vaccine (sIPV) to more than 70 developing countries.

The shot will be made available at an affordable price for countries supported by the GAVI vaccines alliance, which is backed by the Gates Foundation, the World Health Organization, UNICEF and others to fund immunization programs in poor countries.

Polio invades the nervous system and can cause irreversible paralysis within hours - and WHO's repeated warning is that as long as any polio virus is circulating, people are at risk.

But the world is now on the brink of wiping out polio forever, with only 12 cases of the contagious viral disease recorded worldwide so far this year - in Pakistan and Afghanistan.

Global health experts say stopping all polio transmission is possible by the end of this year. The full official, global eradication of polio could be declared by the end of this decade.

Rajeev Venkayya, head of vaccines for Takeda, said the Gates funding would enable his firm to de-risk the investment needed to take the sIPV though final stage clinical trials, licensure, and then onto the market

The vaccine, which was originally licensed from the Japan Polio Research Institute, has already completed mid-stage Phase II trials, Venkayya said. Once it has been fully developed, tested and licensed, it will be manufactured at Takeda's facility in Hikari, Japan.

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Gates Foundation backs Takeda polio vaccine with $38M grant
PARIS, FRANCE - SEPTEMBER 4: Microsoft president Bill Gates demonstrates Microsoft's Windows 95 program from his automobile prior to a press conference in Paris 04 September. Gates was also to meet 500 top computer executives as part of his campaign to launch the company's new software. AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read Michel GANGN/AFP/Getty Images)
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