In one photo, this model shuts down the thigh gap debate once and for all

Health Professionals Warn Of Serious Risks Related To 'Thigh Gap' Trend
Health Professionals Warn Of Serious Risks Related To 'Thigh Gap' Trend

Plus-size model Iskra Lawrence posted an Instagram photo with two different poses to show what it really takes to achieve the coveted thigh gap: good lighting and the right angles.

In the image on the left, Lawrence is seen standing tall with her thighs pressed together. On the right, she foils the illusion of the gap by leaning forward and standing with her legs slightly apart.

"No thigh gap or thigh gap who cares," she captioned the photo. "There's no wrong way just be the healthiest & happiest for you..."

I'll be the first one to tell you pics are all about good lightening and angles. Always remember social medias not real life never let anyone else's pics make you feel insecure about yourself. If you don't look like her and she doesn't look like you that's how it's meant to be.

You are meant to be YOU no one else, your body is your home so love and respect it. When you look after it beautiful things happens."

This isn't the first time Lawrence has spoken out.

From her #AerieReal campaigns to managing the curvy women website Runway Riot, Lawrence is known for issuing body positive messages. Just last month, the British model clapped back at a commenter who called her a fat cow by taking a photo in her bra and panties surrounded by bags of chips.

Model Iskra Lawrence and her positive body messages:

In 2015, she helped create the National Eating Disorders Association's "NEDA Inspires Seal of Approval" to honor companies that were featuring models sans retouching.

And she's not the only one doing so.

In Feb. 2016, Instagram user @plankingforpizza showed a "before and after" photo that was taken in 30 seconds to show how fake transformation photos on the social platform can be. And who can forget Essena O'Neill, the Australian lifestyle blogger who went viral in November 2015 for deleting a large portion of her Instagram photos and re-captioning some to prove that "nothing you see is real."

View this post on Instagram

🚨 This is not a transformation photo 🚨 This week I've decided to do the 30 second transformation photo. These pics were taken second apart this morning. On the left my posture is poor, I'm pushing my belly out as far as possible, I adjusted my bottoms to show my gross, unsightly and horrid love handles. These are often concealed by my high waisted pants and bottoms that do fit so much better now. As much as it pains me to showcase these, it also proves that my body isn't perfect and that I still have work to do and fat to lose (I'm working so hard to get rid of my love handles and lower tummy fat. Yes it has dramatically reduced already but it still exists and I'm still insecure about it). On the right I'm standing straight and comfortably. I'm lightly flexing and I've adjusted my bottoms to hide my love handles. I'm thankful for bikini bottoms that now fit well and hide these but I'm also trying to show that they still exist quite a bit and that not everything we see meets the eye here on social media. You can show you best angles and hide your flaws but at the end of the day what we chose to showcase is a reflection of ourselves. My body isn't perfect. I still have imperfections and flaws that I'm slowly learning to be comfortable with. I want to be real and honest and open. Yes I've accomplished a lot, but yes my body still has less than ideal days when it doesn't look its best. Fitness and health is not a fix. It's not a destination. It's a lifestyle. If you force your progress you know who you are cheating?! You. You only cheat you. Yes I like to show my best most of the time but I've also realized by not showing my worst that it only harms myself. Being vulnerable and imperfect is hard but lying to yourself is worse. I know I'm hard on myself, it's a flaw on its own, but I'm slowly learning to be gentle and kind but it starts with being truthful to myself and knowing and understanding my imperfections and realizing that, although they exist, they don't define me. I am not a before picture. I am not an after picture. I am not fat nor am I perfect. I'm flawed. I'm scarred. I'm insecure. But I'm learning and I'm hopeful that one day I'll fully love me 💕

A post shared by Lifestyle | Wellness (@jesspack_fit) on Feb 9, 2016 at 7:03am PST

Although Instagram is filled with more-than-likely altered bikini selfies, at least there are influencers like Lawrence speaking out about the reality of the perfect snap, reminding us of the importance of loving your body — without or without a thigh gap.