Netflix knows how to get you to watch a show

Netflix Knows How to Get You to Watch a Show


If you were creeped out at the thought of Santa seeing you when you're sleeping and knowing when you're awake, Ol' Saint Nick's got nothing on Netflix.

The streaming service knows exactly what you're watching and how to get you to click play.

And, believe it or not, it's all about the thumbnail.

According to a Netflix blog, neuroscientists found the human brain can process an image "in as little as 13 milliseconds."

Processing text takes much longer, so the company has focused on creating thumbnails that'll get them a thumbs-up from viewers.

See images of the history of Netflix:

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Netflix knows how to get you to watch a show
400303 03: Ready-to-be-shipped DVDs roll down an assembly line January 29, 2002 in San Jose, CA. The online DVD rental site Netflix.com has 500,000 subscribers who can rent, receive and return unlimited discs per month by mail. (Photo By Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
400303 01: Netflix.com Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings holds a ready-to-be-shipped DVD January 29, 2002 in San Jose, CA. The online DVD rental site has 500,000 subscribers who can rent, receive and return unlimited discs per month by mail. (Photo By Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
400303 05: Packages of DVDs await shipment at the Netflix.com headquarters January 29, 2002 in San Jose, CA. The online DVD rental site has 500,000 subscribers who can rent, receive and return unlimited discs per month by mail. (Photo By Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Netflix CEO Reed Hastings gives a keynote address, January 6, 2016 at the CES 2016 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. AFP PHOTO / ROBYN BECK / AFP / ROBYN BECK (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
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Like real estate, thumbnails are all about location, location, location. The company stresses the importance of acknowledging regional differences when choosing images.

As anyone who's ever watched a classic Disney movie knows, the villains are where it's at.

Netflix members respond much better to bad guys than boring old do-gooders.

Regardless, when showing images of people, it's best to show three or less for a small thumbnail.

So rest assured, Kimmy Schmidt isn't a diva who refuses to share the limelight with Jacqueline, Titus and Lillian on Netflix's homepage.

She's just ensuring the biggest crowd possible for Titus's latest one-man show.

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