Chicago mayor, police chief to immediately adopt some task force reforms

Chicago to Adopt Recommendations for Police

CHICAGO (Reuters) -- The mayor of Chicago and the city's police chief said Thursday nearly a third of the recommendations outlined by a panel last week will be implemented immediately to reform a police force under fire for racial bias and the use of excessive force.

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The reforms are focused on restoring accountability in the department, rebuilding public trust and increasing transparency, according to a statement from Mayor Rahm Emanuel's office.

"As a city, we cannot rest until we fully address the systemic issues facing the Chicago Police Department," Emanuel said in the statement. "The police department will implement these reforms immediately while we continue to work together to find additional ways to restore the fabric of trust in communities across Chicago."

RELATED: Protests over shooting death of Laquan McDonald

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Chicago mayor, police chief to immediately adopt some task force reforms
Protesters form a line and walk holding signs that spell out 'Laquan' following the release of a dash-cam video of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald being fatally shot 16 times by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke, on Tuesday, Nov. 24 2015, in Chicago. (Chris Sweda/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
Protesters take to the streets in Chicago following the release of a dash-cam video of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald being fatally shot 16 times by Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke, on Tuesday, Nov. 24 2015. (Nuccio DiNuzzo/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators confront police during a protest following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Police stand guard as demonstrators march through downtown during a protest following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Bus passengers watch as demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CHICAGO, IL - NOVEMBER 24: Demonstrators march through downtown following the release of a video showing Chicago Police officer Jason Van Dyke shooting and killing Laquan McDonald on November 24, 2015 in Chicago, Illinois. Van Dyke was charged today with first degree murder for the October 20, 2014 shooting in which McDonald was hit with 16 bullets. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
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The reforms that will be implemented immediately include a better approach for holding officers accountable for wrongdoing, improving programs to help officers understand cultural differences, Taser-use training and expansion of a body-camera program, the statement said.

A representative from the Fraternal Order of Police, Chicago Lodge 7, which represents rank and file officers, was not immediately available to comment.

Plans are under way to address the rest of the recommendations from the task force's report, which was issued last Wednesday.

The task force report concluded the Chicago Police Department is not doing enough to combat racial bias among officers or to protect the human and civil rights of residents.

Emanuel had created the task force after days of street protests that began last November, triggered by the release of a video showing the fatal shooting of a black teenager, Laquan McDonald, by a white police officer in 2014.

The task force described McDonald's death as a "tipping point" and said community outrage had given voice to long-simmering anger over police actions that included physical and verbal abuse.

The use of lethal force by U.S. police, especially by white officers against unarmed African-Americans and other minorities, has been the focus of nationwide protests and has fueled a civil rights movement under the name 'Black Lives Matter.'

Chicago will review further the overall structure of police accountability and will work with community leaders, ministers and parents to rebuild trust in communities, the statement from Emanuel's office said.

Also last Wednesday, the city council unanimously approved Emanuel's candidate Eddie Johnson to lead the police department facing a federal investigation.

RELATED: The most dangerous cities in the U.S.

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Most dangerous, violent cities in each state
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Chicago mayor, police chief to immediately adopt some task force reforms

43. Honolulu, Hawaii had 11.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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42. Boise, Idaho had 13.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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41. Fargo, North Dakota had 14.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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40. Eugene, Oregon had 15.3 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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39. Lincoln, Nebraska had 17.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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38. Sioux Falls, South Dakota had 20.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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37. Billings, Montana had 21.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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36. Norfolk, Virginia had 24.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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35. Providence, Rhode Island had 26.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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34. Manchester, New Hampshire had 28.9 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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33. Louisville, Kentucky had 30.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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32. South Bend, Indiana had 32.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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31. Tucson, Arizona had 32.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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30. North Charleston, South Carolina had 34.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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29. Tacoma, Washington had 36.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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28. Salt Lake City, Utah had 38.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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27. Des Moines, Iowa had 38.7 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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26. Pueblo, Colorado had 41.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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25. Tulsa, Oklahoma had 41.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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24. New Orleans, Louisiana had 42.7 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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23. Durham, North Carolina had 42.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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22. Jackson, Mississippi had 43.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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21. North Las Vegas, Nevada had 43.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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20. Wichita, Kansas had 45.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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19. Albuquerque, New Mexico had 48.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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18. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania had 49.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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17. Buffalo, New York had 50.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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16. Newark, New Jersey had 50.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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15. Odessa, Texas had 51.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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14. Tallahassee, Florida had 52.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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13. Anchorage, Alaska had 53.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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12. Springfield, Massachusetts had 54.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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11. Atlanta, Georgia had 55.7 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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10. Hartford, Connecticut had 55.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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9. Cleveland, Ohio had 61.5 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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8. Milwaukee, Wisconsin had 65.3 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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7. Stockton, California had 67.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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6. Baltimore, Maryland had 67.7 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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5. Rockford, Illinois had 76.3 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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4. Birmingham, Alabama had 82.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

(Photo by Sean Pavone via Alamy)

3. Detroit, Michigan had 83.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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2. Memphis, Tennessee had 84.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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1. St. Louis, Missouri had 88.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

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