If you can hack the Pentagon, the DOD would like to give you money

If You Can Hack the Pentagon, the DOD Would Like to Give You Money

If you want to hack into secure government information, now is your chance.

April 18 marks day one of the U.S. Department of Defense's pilot program, "Hack the Pentagon." For the first time, the government is offering hackers money to find vulnerabilities within the DOD.

RELATED: National cybersecurity facility in Virginia

24 PHOTOS
National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center - Arlington, Virginia - cybercrime
See Gallery
If you can hack the Pentagon, the DOD would like to give you money
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 11: Admiral Michael Rogers, commander of U.S. Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency, speaks at George Washington University May 11, 2015 in Washington, DC. The George Washington University's Center for Cyber and Homeland Security held a discussion on the state of cybersecurity threats to the United States. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 02: National Security Agency Director and U.S. Cyber command Commander Admiral Michael Rogers takes questions during his keynote address to the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association's sixth annual Cybersecurity Technology Summit at the Capitol Hilton April 2, 2015 in Washington, DC. Taking questions submitted via email from an iPad, Rogers talked about intergovernmental information sharing, private-public partnerships and the new focus on recruitment among people as young as high school students. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 11: Admiral Michael Rogers, commander of U.S. Cyber Command and director of the National Security Agency, speaks at George Washington University May 11, 2015 in Washington, DC. The George Washington University's Center for Cyber and Homeland Security held a discussion on the state of cybersecurity threats to the United States. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - JANUARY 13: U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) on January 13, 2015 in Arlington, Virginia. President Obama discussed efforts to improve the government's ability to collaborate with industry to combat cyber threats. (Photo by Kristoffer Tripplaar-Pool/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - JANUARY 13: U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) on January 13, 2015 in Arlington, Virginia. President Obama discussed efforts to improve the government's ability to collaborate with industry to combat cyber threats. (Photo by Kristoffer Tripplaar-Pool/Getty Images)
US President Barack Obama speaks about cybersecurity alongside Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson (L) as he visits the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in Arlington, Virginia, January 13, 2015. AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - JANUARY 13: U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) on January 13, 2015 in Arlington, Virginia. President Obama discussed efforts to improve the government's ability to collaborate with industry to combat cyber threats. He is joined by Secretary of Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson. (Photo by Kristoffer Tripplaar-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 16: (CHINA OUT, SOUTH KOREA OUT) U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during a joint news conference with British Prime Minister David Cameron at the East Room of the White House January 16, 2015 in Washington, DC. The two leaders had an Oval Office meeting earlier discussing bilateral issues including economic growth, international trade, cybersecurity, Iran, ISIL, counterterrorism, Ebola, and Russias actions in Ukraine. (Photo by The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Director of control Systems Security Sean Paul McGurk speaks at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) as they prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - OCTOBER 30: Staff members attend an event where Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano delivered remarks at the opening ceremony of the new U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team/National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center facility October 30, 2009 in Arlington, Virginia. The center is designed to help protect the technical infrastructure of the United States. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Director of Control Systems Security Sean Paul McGurk speaks at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) as they prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - OCTOBER 30: Staff members attend an event where Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano delivered remarks at the opening ceremony of the new U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team/National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center facility October 30, 2009 in Arlington, Virginia. The center is designed to help protect the technical infrastructure of the United States. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY US-GOVERNMENT-COMPUTER-SECURITY-INTERNET BY CHRIS LEFKOW Analyists at the National Cybersecurity & Communications Integration Center (NCCIC) prepare for Cyber Storm III during a media session at their headquarters in Arlington, VA, September 24, 2010. Cyber Storm III is NCCIC's capstone national-level cybersecurity exercise. AFP PHOTO/Jim WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

But it's not a free-for-all. To legally break into the Pentagon's data files, you have to register for the program through HackerOne and meet the eligibility requirements. So if you live in a country that's under U.S. trade sanctions or if you're on the list that bans you from doing business with Americans -- your hacking services are not welcome.

Eligible hackers have until May 12 to try to break into the Pentagon's defenses. Those who find a bug or vulnerability will get paid from the program's $150,000 funding pool.

RELATED: Notable data breaches over time

9 PHOTOS
Notable data breaches in the US recently
See Gallery
If you can hack the Pentagon, the DOD would like to give you money
LONDON, ENGLAND - AUGUST 19: A detail of the Ashley Madison website on August 19, 2015 in London, England. Hackers who stole customer information from the cheating site AshleyMadison.com dumped 9.7 gigabytes of data to the dark web on Tuesday fulfilling a threat to release sensitive information including account details, log-ins and credit card details, if Avid Life Media, the owner of the website didn't take Ashley Madison.com offline permanently. (Photo by Carl Court/Getty Images)
Katherine Archuleta, director of the U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM), speaks during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on the OPM data breach in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, June 24, 2015. U.S. senators said yesterday they doubt the government's personnel office understands the breadth of a computer hack that exposed the records of more than 4 million federal workers, or that the agency can stop another breach. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 05: The entrance to the Theodore Roosevelt Federal Building that houses the Office of Personnel Management headquarters is shown June 5, 2015 in Washington, DC. U.S. investigators have said that at least four million current and former federal employees might have had their personal information stolen by Chinese hackers. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
SCHAUMBURG, IL - AUGUST 04: A statue of a horse stands at the entrance to a P.F. Chang's restaurant on August 4, 2014 in Schaumburg, Illinois. P.F. Chang's China Bistro Ltd. said today that the company experienced a data breach involving customers' credit and debit card information which affected 33 restaurants in 16 states, including the Schaumburg, Illinois location. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
PORTLAND, ME - AUGUST 15: Shaws on Congress Street on Friday, July 15, 2014. Shaws parent company is investigating a possible data breach. (Photo by Logan Werlinger/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
COLMA, CA - APRIL 18: Customers enter a Michaels art and crafts store on April 18, 2014 in Colma, California. Michaels, the largest arts and crafts chain in the U.S., announced that an estimated 2.6 million cards used at its stores across the country may have been affected by a security breach. Aaron Brothers, a subsidiary of Michaels, was also affected by the breach. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
CORAL GABLES, FL - FEBRUARY 28: A checkout keypad is seen at a Sears store on February 28, 2014 in Coral Gables, Florida. According to reports the U.S. Secret Service is investigating a possible digital attack at Sears Holdings Corp. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
A couple of shoppers leave a Target store on a rainy afternoon in Alhambra, California on December19, 2013, as the US retail giant said some 40 million customers may have had bank card data compromised by hackers who broke into its database as holiday shopping got underway. Target said there had been 'unauthorized access' to its payment system in US stores affecting credit and debit cards with approximately 40 million credit and debit cards possibly affected by the breach between November 27 and December 15, the company said in a statement. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. Brown (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.