Singer dies after refusing treatment for cobra bite during performance

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon

Singer Dies After Refusing Treatment For Cobra Bite During Performance

The king cobra is certainly a mesmerizing creature to behold, but it also packs an especially powerful and deadly venom.

Indonesian music star Irma Bule was bitten by one in the midst of a performance and died roughly 45 minutes later, reports Sky News.

The snake was part of the act, and while Bule was dancing she stepped on its tail.

Immediately, the cobra struck out, sinking its fangs into her leg.

Learn more about cobras:

13 PHOTOS
King cobras
See Gallery
Singer dies after refusing treatment for cobra bite during performance

Venomous Indian cobra

(Photo credit: Getty)

Close up of cobra snake rising out of a basket, moving to music of the snake charmer flute. The Indian cobra, Naja naja, shown here with its hood expanded, is often regarded as the archetypal cobra.

(Photo credit: Getty)

Red Spitting Cobra (Naja pallida) with mouth open showing windpipe.

(Photo credit: Getty)

Close-up of an Egyptian cobra (Heloderma horridum) rearing up, Lake Victoria, Uganda.

(Photo credit: Getty)

Spitting cobra in Washington state, USA.

(Photo credit: Getty)

A cobra is spotted at the Masai Mara Game Reserve in Kenya.

(Photo credit: Getty)

A snake Charmer with two Indian Cobras in Jaipur, India.

(Photo credit: Getty)

Black Pakistani Cobra (Naja naja karachiensis)

(Photo credit: Getty)

The rarely-seen coastal taipan is one of the world's most dangerous snakes. They have long fangs and an extremely potent venom. Taipans are only found in Australia and Papua New Guinea.This species is typically known from the east coast but small populations occur in the Northern Territory and in Western Australia. This specimen was found in the North Kimberley in Western Australia.

(Photo credit: Getty)

A Spitting Black-Necked Cobra (Naja nigricollis) in Africa,.

(Photo credit: Getty)

The Indian Cobra is known around the world as highly venomous snake that feeds on rodents, lizards, and frogs. As well as biting, the Indian cobra can attack or defend itself from a distance by "spitting" venom, which, if it enters the opponent's eyes, causes severe pain and damage. The snake actually forces the venom through its fangs, by exerting muscular pressure on the venom glands, so that it sprays out in twin jets for 2 m (6 1/2 ft) or more. Behaviour of Indian Cobra When threatened, the Indian Cobra will assume its characteristic posture. It will raise the front one-third of its body and elongate its long, flexible neck ribs and loose skin to form its distinctive hood, on which are resembled eyes. .Status of Cobra in India Although the Indian Cobra is not an endangered species, it has recently been hunted for its distinctive hood markings in the production of handbags. It is listed under the treaty because it closely resembles other species that are threatened and in need of protection. Physical Characteristics of Indian Cobra The Indian Cobra's most known characteristic features are the wide black band on the underside of the neck, and the hood marking design which shows half-rings on either side of the hood. It is a smooth-scaled snake with black eyes, a wide neck and head, and a medium-sized body. Its colouring varies from black, to dark brown, to a creamy white. The body is usually covered with a spectacled white or yellow pattern, which sometimes forms ragged bands. The Indian cobra may grow from 1.8m to 2.2m. Those Cobras which have the single ring on the hood are found in Assam and Eastern India and spit venom like the Ringhals Cobra of South Africa which can eject a spray for a distance of more than two meters and cause severe eye pain, sometimes blindness. Keepers who attend this particular variety of Cobra sensibly wear goggles.

(Photo credit: Getty)

Most of cobra species are in the family Elapidae, all of which are venomous. Most of them can spread their neck ribs to form a flattened, widened hood.

(Photo credit: Getty)

HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

According to the local reports, a snake handler rushed to administer an anti-venom, but the singer refused it.

Bule continued her performance until she began to vomit and ultimately collapsed.

She was rushed to a hospital and later pronounced dead.

The pop star often used snakes in her performances, and typically the venomous sorts were defanged.

Police in Indonesia are currently investigating the singer's death.

Related: See these incredibly poisonous animals:

4 PHOTOS
Poisonous animals
See Gallery
Singer dies after refusing treatment for cobra bite during performance
Mangshan Pit Viper - Venomous Snake
A view of a young Komodo dragon Ivan, one of two males Komodo dragons at the Bioparco zoo in Rome, on May 15, 2014. AFP PHOTO / TIZIANA FABI (Photo credit should read TIZIANA FABI/AFP/Getty Images)
A Poison dark frog (Oophaga lehmanni), is photographed in a laboratory at the zoo in Cali, Colombia, on April 21, 2015. The zoo of Cali, has the largest amphibians laboratory in the country, where they perform studies on the conservation of some amphibian species in danger of extinction. Colombia has the second largest biodiversity in the world. Activists across the globe will celebrate Earth Day on April 22 with events aimed at bringing awareness of environmental concerns. AFP PHOTO/LUIS ROBAYO (Photo credit should read LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Read Full Story

Sign up for Entertainment Insider by AOL and get the top celebrity, movies, music and TV news delivered to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

From Our Partners