This rapper is demanding that 'ignorant' Donald Trump stop using his hit song at rallies

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Musician Blasts Donald Trump for Using His Song at Rallies

Everlast isn't in a light mood after hearing that Donald Trump is using his band House of Pain's hit song "Jump Around" at campaign events.

Rather, the rapper and former leader of House of Pain jumped on to Instagram and threatened legal action if Trump continues to use the 1992 hit at his events.

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"I've been informed [Donald Trump] is using 'Jump Around' at his rallies," Everlast wrote on Instagram. "Stop playing my song, you ignorant racist piece of s--t. Lawyers are already on it. I don't want your money. No amount you offer will get the license. I would love to meet you and smack that comb over right off your scalp, you scumbag!!!"

TMZ suggested that Trump's use of the rap song at events is temporary, as he had been campaigning in Wisconsin ahead of Tuesday's primaries there, and "Jump Around" is traditionally played at University of Wisconsin football games.

RELATED: Wisconsin Anti-Trump Rally

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This rapper is demanding that 'ignorant' Donald Trump stop using his hit song at rallies
Protesters demonstrate outside a campaign rally for Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump in Janesville, Wisconsin, March 29, 2016. REUTERS/Kamil Krzaczynski
Protesters demonstrate outside a campaign rally for Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump in Janesville, Wisconsin, March 29, 2016. REUTERS/Kamil Krzaczynski
UNITED STATES - MARCH 29: Anti-Trump protesters gather in the free speech zone outside of the Janesville Conference Center in Janesville, Wis., in advance of the Donald Trump for President rally in Speaker of the House Paul Ryan's home town on Tuesday, March 29, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Anti-Trump protesters demonstrate outside a campaign event for Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, not pictured, in Janesville, Wisconsin, U.S., on Tuesday, March 29, 2016. Trump began his closing bid to capture Wisconsin's winner-take-all Republican primary by trying to address one of the biggest vulnerabilities of his campaign for the presidency: the female vote. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - MARCH 29: A Trump supporter debates with anti-Trump protesters in the free speech zone outside of the Janesville Conference Center in Janesville, Wis., in advance of the Donald Trump for President rally in Speaker of the House Paul Ryan's home town on Tuesday, March 29, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Anti-Trump protesters demonstrate outside a campaign event for Donald Trump, president and chief executive of Trump Organization Inc. and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, not pictured, in Janesville, Wisconsin, U.S., on Tuesday, March 29, 2016. Trump began his closing bid to capture Wisconsin's winner-take-all Republican primary by trying to address one of the biggest vulnerabilities of his campaign for the presidency: the female vote. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg via Getty Images
JANESVILLE, WI - MARCH 29: Demonstrators protest outside a campaign rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Holiday Inn Express hotel on March 29, 2016 in Janesville, Wisconsin. Wisconsin voters go to the polls for the state's primary on April 5. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
JANESVILLE, WI - MARCH 29: Demonstrators protest outside a campaign rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Holiday Inn Express hotel on March 29, 2016 in Janesville, Wisconsin. Wisconsin voters go to the polls for the state's primary on April 5. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
JANESVILLE, WI - MARCH 29: Demonstrators protest outside a campaign rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Holiday Inn Express hotel on March 29, 2016 in Janesville, Wisconsin. Wisconsin voters go to the polls for the state's primary on April 5. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
JANESVILLE, WI - MARCH 29: Demonstrators and supporters of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump wait for the start of a campaign rally at the Holiday Inn Express hotel on March 29, 2016 in Janesville, Wisconsin. Wisconsin voters go to the polls for the state's primary on April 5. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
JANESVILLE, WI - MARCH 29: Demonstrators protest outside a campaign rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Holiday Inn Express hotel on March 29, 2016 in Janesville, Wisconsin. Wisconsin voters go to the polls for the state's primary on April 5. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
JANESVILLE, WI - MARCH 29: Demonstrators protest outside a campaign rally for Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump at the Holiday Inn Express hotel on March 29, 2016 in Janesville, Wisconsin. Wisconsin voters go to the polls for the state's primary on April 5. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Protesters demonstrate outside a campaign rally for Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump in Janesville, Wisconsin, March 29, 2016. REUTERS/Kamil Krzaczynski
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Although the song has been regarded in pop culture as a party song or rallying call since its release, its violent lyrics make it a strange choice for a presidential campaign song.

A representative for the Trump campaign has yet to respond to Business Insider's request for comment.

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