Coca-Cola is crushing it in this drink industry, and it isn't what you think

Coca-Cola Is Venturing Into the Milk Business
Coca-Cola Is Venturing Into the Milk Business

Soda and milk may seem like an unlikely (and not so tasty) combination, but Coca-Cola's pretty confident that it can change your mind about that.

Last February, the company teamed up with Minute-Maid company Fairlife to create a super milk under Fairlife's name. The milk has 50 percent more protein than regular milk, plus it's lactose-free.

SEE ALSO: The UK just announced a tax on sugar -- and it's scary news for Coca-Cola and Pepsi

And at almost a year later, the results are looking pretty good for Coke on its endeavor.

According to Bloomberg:

"Specialty milk sales jumped 21 percent in 2015, up from 9 percent in 2014."

Fairlife sales, specifically, have amassed a total of over $90M. This is big news for the food and drink industry, as well as for Coca-Cola itself.

It's been estimated that American consumption of milk each year has dropped by 23 gallons since 1945.

Coke Debuts New Reformulated Milk Called Fairlife, Boasting More Protein And Less Sugar
Coke Debuts New Reformulated Milk Called Fairlife, Boasting More Protein And Less Sugar

Translation: The milk industry isn't a very profitable one these days. But Coke seems to be proving everyone wrong.

Each bottle of Fairlife is priced at around $4 per 52-ounces.

Here's the current stock price for Coca-Cola:

While this may seem pricey for milk, the company is confident that the right demographic will be willing to spend for the quality they feel they're getting.

Scott Uzzell, president and general manager of Coke's Venturing and Emerging Brands group, has one explanation as to why the partnership has proved so successful so far:

"They know dairy better than anybody. We know consumers."

RELATED: A look at Coca-Cola through the years

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