An inside look at an ultra-Orthodox wedding in Israel

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Ultra Orthodox Jewish wedding
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An inside look at an ultra-Orthodox wedding in Israel

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride takes part in the "mitzva tantz", the custom in which relatives dance in front of the bride after her wedding ceremony, in Netanya, Israel, late March 15, 2016. Thousands took part in the wedding of the grandson of Rabbi Yosef Dov Moshe Halberstam, religious leader of the Sanz Hasidic dynasty and the granddaughter of the religious leader of Toldos Avraham Yitzchak Hasidic dynasty, in Netanya on Tuesday night.

(REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man uses binoculars during the wedding ceremony the grandson of Rabbi Yosef Dov Moshe Halberstam, religious leader of the Sanz Hasidic dynasty and the granddaughter of the religious leader of Toldos Avraham Yitzchak Hasidic dynasty, in Netanya, Israel March 15, 2016. Picture taken March 15, 2016.

(REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

Family members lead Ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride Parowol Mirel Lamber, from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok (Hasidic dynasty), to marry the great-grandson of the Rabbi of the Tzanz Ultra-Orthodox Hasidic community at a wedding ceremony on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men take part in the wedding ceremony of the grandson of Rabbi Yosef Dov Moshe Halberstam, religious leader of the Sanz Hasidic dynasty and the granddaughter of the religious leader of Toldos Avraham Yitzchak Hasidic dynasty, in Netanya, Israel, March 15, 2016.

(REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride takes part in the "mitzva tantz", the custom in which relatives dance in front of the bride after her wedding ceremony, in Netanya, Israel, early March 16, 2016. Thousands took part in the wedding of the grandson of Rabbi Yosef Dov Moshe Halberstam, religious leader of the Sanz Hasidic dynasty and the granddaughter of the religious leader of Toldos Avraham Yitzchak Hasidic dynasty, in Netanya on Tuesday night.

(REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Hasidim attend the wedding ceremony of Parowol Mirel Lamber, the bride from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok Hasidim community, and Natan Meir Neta Hilbershtam, the groom from the Tzanz Hasidic dynasty, on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Family members lead Ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride Parowol Mirel Lamber, from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok (Hasidic dynasty), to marry the great-grandson of the Rabbi of the Tzanz Ultra-Orthodox Hasidic community at a wedding ceremony on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Hasidim attend the wedding ceremony of Parowol Mirel Lamber, the bride from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok Hasidim community, and Natan Meir Neta Hilbershtam, the groom from the Tzanz Hasidic dynasty, on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride takes part in the "mitzva tantz", the custom in which relatives dance in front of the bride after her wedding ceremony, in Netanya, Israel early March 16, 2016. Thousands took part in the wedding of the grandson of Rabbi Yosef Dov Moshe Halberstam, religious leader of the Sanz Hasidic dynasty and the granddaughter of the religious leader of Toldos Avraham Yitzchak Hasidic dynasty, in Netanya on Tuesday night.

(REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Hasidim dance during the wedding ceremony of Parowol Mirel Lamber, the bride from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok Hasidim community, and Natan Meir Neta Hilbershtam, the groom from the Tzanz Hasidic dynasty, on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish groom Natan Meir Neta Hilbershtam, from the Tzanz Hasidic dynasty, arrives on a horse-drawn carriage for his wedding with the granddaughter of Rabbi Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Hasidim attend the wedding ceremony of Parowol Mirel Lamber, the bride from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok Hasidim community, and Natan Meir Neta Hilbershtam, the groom from the Tzanz Hasidic dynasty, on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Family members lead Ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride Parowol Mirel Lamber, from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok (Hasidic dynasty), to marry the great-grandson of the Rabbi of the Tzanz Ultra-Orthodox Hasidic community at a wedding ceremony on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Hasidim dance during the wedding ceremony of Parowol Mirel Lamber, the bride from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok Hasidim community, and Natan Meir Neta Hilbershtam, the groom from the Tzanz Hasidic dynasty, on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish children run next to a horse-drawn carriage carrying Natan Meir Neta Hilbershtam, the groom from the Tzanz Hasidic dynasty, before his wedding with Parowol Mirel Lamber from the Toldos Avrohon Yitzchok Hasidic dynasty, on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Family members lead Ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride Parowol Mirel Lamber, from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok (Hasidic dynasty), to marry the great-grandson of the Rabbi of the Tzanz Ultra-Orthodox Hasidic community at a wedding ceremony on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish children stand next to a horse-drawn carriage carrying Natan Meir Neta Hilbershtam, the groom from the Tzanz Hasidic dynasty, before his wedding with Parowol Mirel Lamber from the Toldos Avrohon Yitzchok Hasidic dynasty, on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men and women attend the wedding ceremony of the grandson of Rabbi Yosef Dov Moshe Halberstam, religious leader of the Sanz Hasidic dynasty, and the granddaughter of the religious leader of Toldos Avraham Yitzchak Hasidic dynasty, in Netanya, Israel, early March 16, 2016.

(REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men attend the wedding ceremony of the grandson of Rabbi Yosef Dov Moshe Halberstam, religious leader of the Sanz Hasidic dynasty and the granddaughter of the religious leader of Toldos Avraham Yitzchak Hasidic dynasty, in Netanya, Israel March 15, 2016.

(REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride arrives to her wedding ceremony on a carriage in Netanya, Israel March 15, 2016. Thousands took part in the wedding of the grandson of Rabbi Yosef Dov Moshe Halberstam, religious leader of the Sanz Hasidic dynasty and the granddaughter of the religious leader of Toldos Avraham Yitzchak Hasidic dynasty, in Netanya on Tuesday night.

(REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

An ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride takes part in the "mitzva tantz", the custom in which relatives dance in front of the bride after her wedding ceremony, in Netanya, Israel, late March 15, 2016. Thousands took part in the wedding of the grandson of Rabbi Yosef Dov Moshe Halberstam, religious leader of the Sanz Hasidic dynasty and the granddaughter of the religious leader of Toldos Avraham Yitzchak Hasidic dynasty, in Netanya on Tuesday night.

(REUTERS/Baz Ratner)

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish bride Parowol Mirel Lamber, from the Toldos Avrohom Yitzchok (Hasidic dynasty), arrives on a horse-drawn carriage for her wedding with the great-grandson of the Rabbi of the Tzanz Ultra-Orthodox Hasidic community on March 15, 2016, in the Israeli central city of Netanya.

(MENAHEM KAHANA/AFP/Getty Images)

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Fascinating photos from a traditional Orthodox Jewish wedding showcase the religion's unique and ultra-Orthodox traditions.

The wedding was a huge spectacle with the groom being a grandson of a famous rabbi. Thousands lined the streets to catch a glimpse of the the newlyweds.

Orthodox Jews, who are known to be extremely conservative, had female and male guests separated by a gauze curtain and the bride wore a full-face veil.

Click through the slideshow above to take a look inside the ceremony.

Related: Orthodox jews begin to join Israel's military:

Ultra-Orthodox Jews Quietly Joining Military

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