Life under ISIS: Girls as young as 8 are being repeatedly raped by fighters and beaten when they resist

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The War Against ISIS

Women and girls living under ISIS rule are being raped, beaten, and tortured.

A new report by the Quilliam Foundation, a counter-extremism think tank, details what life is like for children who live under ISIS rule, and highlights how girls are treated.

According to numerous reports, rapes and beatings are commonplace in the "caliphate."

RELATED: Life under the rule of ISIS

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What life looks like under ISIS rule
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Life under ISIS: Girls as young as 8 are being repeatedly raped by fighters and beaten when they resist
A civilian woman carries her child during a battle with Islamic State militants, east of Mosul, Iraq, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
Civilians walk past Iraqi Special Operations Forces (ISOF) during a battle with Islamic State militants, east of Mosul, Iraq, January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Azad Lashkari
A displaced man, who fled the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, carries a woman in the Mithaq district of eastern Mosul, Iraq, January 3, 2017. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Smoke rises from clashes during a battle with Islamic State militants in the Mithaq district of eastern Mosul, Iraq, January 3, 2017. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
An Iraqi soldier is seen during a battle with Islamic State militants, north of Mosul, Iraq, December 30, 2016. REUTERS/Khalid al Mousily
Iraqi people flee the Islamic State stronghold in the town of Bartella, east of Mosul, December 28, 2016. REUTERS/Ammar Awad TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Iraqi people flee the Islamic State stronghold in the town of Bartella, east of Mosul, December 28, 2016. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
Iraqi rapid response forces cook food in their headquarters during the war against the Islamic state militants east of Mosul, Iraq, December 21, 2016. REUTERS/Khalid al Mousily
Mohammad Hassan, whose hand was chopped off by Islamic State militants, sits outside a house at Nimrud village, south of Mosul, Iraq, December 13, 2016. Picture taken December 13, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem
Displaced Iraqi boys, who fled the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, warm themselves by a fire in Khazer camp, Iraq,December 15, 2016.REUTERS/Ammar Awad
Displaced Iraqi woman, who fled the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, bids her relatives farewell as she leave Khazer camp to go home, Iraq December 10, 2016.REUTERS/Ammar Awad
Iraqi Christians come to visit the heavily damaged Church of the Immaculate Conception after Iraqi forces recaptured it from Islamic State in Qaraqosh, near Mosul, Iraq, December 9, 2016. REUTERS/Ammar Awad
An Iraqi father (L) mourns the death of his son, who was killed during clashes in the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, in al-Samah neighborhood, Iraq December 1, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem
An Iraqi girl, who was wounded during clashes in the Islamic State stronghold of Mosul, lies on a bed at a field hospital in al-Samah neighborhood, Iraq December 1, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammed Salem
Displaced people who fled the clashes transfer to camps during a battle with Islamic State militants in Mosul, Iraq, November 30, 2016 REUTERS/Alaa Al-Marjani
A member of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces (ISOF) gestures in military vehicle during a battle with Islamic State militants in Mosul, Iraq, November 30, 2016 REUTERS/Alaa Al-Marjani TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
A man gestures as other men sit on the ground as an Iraqi Special forces intelligence team check their ID cards as they search for Islamic State fighters in Mosul, Iraq November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
Two men hold hands as an Iraqi Special forces intelligence team searches for Islamic State fighters in Mosul, Iraq November 27, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
Oilfields burned by Islamic State fighters are seen in Qayyara, south of Mosul, Iraq November 23, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Boys stand in front of oilfields burned by Islamic State fighters in Qayyara, south of Mosul, Iraq November 23, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic
Civilians flee fighting between Iraqi forces and Islamic State fighters in Mosul, Iraq, November 20, 2016. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Smoke rises from clashes during a battle with Islamic State militants at the airport of Tal Afar west of Mosul, Iraq November 18, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
A member of Shi'ite fighters carries a weapon during a battle with Islamic State militants at the airport of Tal Afar west of Mosul, Iraq November 18, 2016. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani
A displaced woman from the outskirts of Mosul covers herself in a blanket in the town of Bashiqa, after it was recaptured from the Islamic State, east of Mosul, Iraq, November 18, 2016. REUTERS/Khalid al Mousily
A girl attends classes after the city was recaptured from the Islamic State militants in Qayyara, Iraq, November 17, 2016. REUTERS/Ari Jalal
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In an especially brutal account, one woman recounts how a girl as young as eight or nine was publicly raped by ISIS (also known as the Islamic State, ISIL, and Daesh) fighters. Witnesses also detail how children and women who try to resist are beaten and threatened with death.

The report quotes another young girl who said she was repeatedly raped in a hall where she was being detained with other women after being abducted by ISIS. Several other women also described how young women and girls were sexually assaulted on a daily basis and would return to the hall, sometimes days later, in a "miserable condition."

Another girl is quoted discussing how she and a 13-year-old girl were sold to fighters, raped, and when they tried to resist, beaten using a pair of shoes.

Many reports over the last few months have highlighted ISIS' barbaric treatment of women living under its control. New York Times reporter Rukmini Callimachi exposed last August how the group has enshrined a theology of rape among its fighters.

RELATED: The fight against ISIS

10 PHOTOS
US Centcom new ISIS videos (updated March 2016)
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Life under ISIS: Girls as young as 8 are being repeatedly raped by fighters and beaten when they resist
A Coalition airstrike destroys a Daesh weapons storage warehouse near Fallujah, Iraq to disrupt terrorist operations. The strikes were conducted as part of Operation Inherent Resolve, the operation to eliminate the Daesh terrorist group and the threat they pose to Iraq, Syria, and the wider international community. The destruction of Daesh targets in Syria and Iraq further limits the group's ability to project terror and conduct operations.
This video depicts a strike against an ISIL ammunition bunker near Bayji, Iraq. The strikes were conducted as part of Inherent Resolve, the operation to eliminate the terrorist group ISIL and the threat they pose to Iraq, the region and the wider international community. The destruction of ISIL targets in Syria and Iraq further limits the terrorist group’s ability to project power and conduct operations. Coalition nations conducting airstrikes in Iraq include the U.S., Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Coalition Nations conducting airstrikes in Syria include the U.S., Bahrain, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.
Airstrike against ISIL bunker conducted 4 November near Bayji, Iraq.
Operational video of a U.S. airstrike against an ISIL logistics base west of Mosul, Iraq Oct. 27
U.S. Air Force C-130 aircraft conducted an airdrop Oct. 27 in the vicinity of Al Asad Air Base, Iraq, to provide humanitarian aid for delivery by Iraqi Security Forces to members of the Iraqi Albu Nimr tribe. The aircraft delivered more than 7,000 halal meals which were retrieved by ISF and delivered to the tribe who recently relocated from their homes near Hit, Iraq, to flee ISIL aggression. The C-130 aircraft, which are deployed to the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility, exited the airdrop zone safely.
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A 12-year-old girl, whom Callimachi described as so small "an adult could circle her waist with two hands," told her that the ISIS member who raped her prayed before raping her, forced her to pray also and explained to her that because she was an "unbeliever" the Quran not only allowed, but encouraged the rape.

"I kept telling him it hurts -- please stop. He said that by raping me, he is drawing closer to God," she said. The girl escaped after 11 months of captivity.

Quilliam's report notes how Islamic State supporters persecute groups it considers as "other," such as people with different ethnicities and religions. The massacre of Yazidi men and exploitation as sex slaves of Yazidi women is one such example.

Never leave the house and produce men

The only future offered to young girls and women by ISIS is a domestic one. From an early age they are taught how to look after the house, the needs of their husband, how to bring up their children according to ISIS ideology, and how to sew and knit.

The report defines the woman's role as "building the Ummah (a community of Muslims), producing men, and sending them out to the fierceness of battle." Girls can be married off at the age of nine and at the latest at 16 or 17, according to Quilliam's research.

The "flowers and pearls of the caliphate," as girls are known, are also expected to be fully veiled, remain hidden and "never leave the house, except in exceptional circumstances," and whenever they leave their home, women have to accompanied by a male relative at all times.

ISIS loyalists also ensure the dress code is strictly adhered to. Patrick Cockburn in The Independent reported that a metal instrument known as the "Biter"was being used on women who failed to appropriately cover themselves. The tool clips off pieces of flesh and is used on parts of the body which are not covered.

"My sister was punished so harshly last month because she had forgotten her gloves and left them at home," a woman who had managed to escape Mosul recounts. Her sister said the pain was worse than labour.

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